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Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

What's the deal with the Massachusetts State Hockey Coaches Association? Their website poses as if Mass high school hockey is the springboard to college hockey and how every kid should stay in local high school hockey. Get a clue! If you putzes did more to advance the talented kids, build bridges to the Junior teams, get kids in front of college coaches, have your kids attend local combines and get them more showcase opportunities THEN THEY WOULDN'T LEAVE!

Instead they put out a crapbag website that pretty much states - 'you don't need to go the juniors route' when the kids do all have to eventually. So by bad mouthing the chances a kid has to improve his game will make him stay on the local high school team when you do nothing for him?


Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Made up of the same guys that post here that think playing the sport for their HS team with the packed stands is going to be the pinnacle of their lives. God, I hope not! We should aspire to more than that for our kids.

The immutable force pulling in the opposite direction is the misguided inflation of parents' opinions of their sons' abilities. A lot of kids in Junior Juniors (U16, U18) would be better off staying on their school team, because that's where it will, and should, end. But, now that we have NA3HL and USP3HL, we've created a pay to play avenue for kids post-HS that is pretty mediocre. So, the parents feel compelled to jump from bad team to bad team, with the belief that there is still a future D1, D3 or professional roster spot out there.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

But even the post high school bridges need to be built by these coaches. Some will say, "Hey that's not the high school coach's job" and that is right. But if they want to keep these kids for 3-4 years they need to wake up and see how to do it.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Having watched a lot of college, junior, high school, midget and summer showcase games over the past few years, something seems painfully obviously, but it won't happen without a lot of pressure from key figures in the hockey community.

USA Hockey brass and NCAA coaches need to step in and make the game better and help the financial pockets of all hockey parents who have kids aspiring to play Division I or Division III hockey.

There are far too many junior hockey leagues and the crux of the problem is out east. Don't get me wrong. The United States Hockey League (USHL) is a terrific league and any parent or player would be silly to not jump at the opportunity to play in the finest development path to college hockey. This argument is not against the USHL, it is against the lesser leagues that are watered down and only viable due to the money it brings in for its organizers.

Where the problem lies is at the lower levels of "junior hockey." The words junior hockey are in quotations because half of the leagues and teams that call themselves junior hockey are an absolute joke. Not to pick on the USPHL, but that league having an empire, elite and premier divisions is just complete nonsense.

However, don't expect it to stop anytime soon. The owners of these leagues and the teams in the leagues make far too much money off gullible hockey parents and players who can't hang up the skates and realize the dream is over.

Several times in the past few years this writer has heard of or directly seen examples of kids not good enough to make their public high school team or gaining significant ice time heading off to "junior hockey." This is absurd and is proof of the watered down nature of "junior hockey." Junior hockey should be for the best of the best. It should be for kids who have finished playing high school hockey who need a little more time to develop, but who have a legitimate shot at playing college hockey. As it stands now, more than half the teams out east are filled with kids who have very little chance of playing Division I.

This is where USA Hockey and NCAA coaches need to step in and send a message -- loud and clear. Playing high school or prep school hockey isn't a bad thing. As a Division I college coach told me last season, "If you're a good player, we'll find you."

Sure, right now with the current makeup of the NCAA developmental path, many parents and players are forced to leave high school hockey in favor of full-year midget teams. However, that could change if enough influential coaches and others in the hockey community push for a change.

I'm not naive enough to think my opinion matters or will even change anything, but there has to be enough coaches and USA Hockey brass who have the ability to put an end to this nonsense.

Play high school or prep hockey during the high school or prep season and play for the split season midget teams during the fall and spring. When a player graduates and has a better than average chance of continuing his career to college, play a season or two of junior hockey in the USHL, NAHL or a single league out east. The EHL and USPHL need to be merged and about half the teams need to be eliminated.

There are several examples of kids playing Division 2 or Division 3 high school hockey in Massachusetts before heading to a year of junior hockey or a PG year at a prep school then receiving a scholarship offer from a Hockey East school.

This won't be a popular opinion among the lesser junior leagues and its owners and coaches, but it's a message that needs to be said. Watching today's two separate USPHL Premier Division "All-Star Games" at Merrimack College was a lost three hours for every observer in the building.

Sure, there were some good players. Vermont recruit Conor O'Neil of the Jersey Hitmen and un-committed Ryan Cloonan of the Junior Bruins showed off some nice skill, but there were far too many players who had no business being on the ice for a so-called junior hockey All-Star Game.

However, as the current makeup of the USPHL stands, it hurts players and doesn't benefit scouts trying to find good players. The Jersey Hitmen, Junior Bruins and South Shore Kings are relatively good hockey teams with several players going to Division I and some rightfully so garnering NHL Draft attention.

The problem is those players have to play against the bottom half of the league, which is just downright awful. Eliminate junior leagues, eliminate teams, combine the top half of the EHL and USPHL and everyone - players, coaches, recruiters and scouts - will all be better off.

--

This is so true about junior hockey on the east coast.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

If I wanted to read an article about east coast junior hockey I would Google 'east coast junior hockey.'

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Guess that last post of thoughtful insight was too many words for you. How about you Google "me play hockey good".

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

5thgradelevel
Guess that last post of thoughtful insight was too many words for you. How about you Google "me play hockey good".
I'd rather hear what 'thoughtful insight' you have than read "this writer's" BS. Unless, of course your opinion would basically just be his - something you got from reading "some obscure passage and then you pretend - you pawn off as your own idea?"

See if you get that reference, Jethro.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

THE biggest lie in hockey that has been told for generations is: "If you're a good player, we'll find you."

Maybe it should be restated; "If you are connected, your father or uncle played in the NHL, your dad is a D-1 coach, an NHL scout or an NHL front office employee, if your blood line is scattered with D-1 and NHL DNA or your brother is already onboard, if you played in the right program or for the right coaches and went to the right camps we will find you."

The differences between D-1 and top-end D-3 is so slim. Look at the legacy kids who get moved along while everyone else scratches their heads and know if the back of the kid's sweater said "Kaplinski" instead of "NHL Offspring" the kid would have faded from the scene as he graduated high school.

How about the story of the local kid that played public h.s. hockey and went out to the Midwest on his own and the USHL coaches said, "Kid, where have you been?" Local experts and local high school coaches all missed it evidently. They didn't "find him."

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Anon
THE biggest lie in hockey that has been told for generations is: "If you're a good player, we'll find you."

Maybe it should be restated; "If you are connected, your father or uncle played in the NHL, your dad is a D-1 coach, an NHL scout or an NHL front office employee, if your blood line is scattered with D-1 and NHL DNA or your brother is already onboard, if you played in the right program or for the right coaches and went to the right camps we will find you."

The differences between D-1 and top-end D-3 is so slim. Look at the legacy kids who get moved along while everyone else scratches their heads and know if the back of the kid's sweater said "Kaplinski" instead of "NHL Offspring" the kid would have faded from the scene as he graduated high school.

How about the story of the local kid that played public h.s. hockey and went out to the Midwest on his own and the USHL coaches said, "Kid, where have you been?" Local experts and local high school coaches all missed it evidently. They didn't "find him."
Then that kid's father didn't do enough to help his kid. And I highly doubt he went "unnoticed" by his coaches - more likely, they didn't feel the need to help him. Maybe he was just a late bloomer. Maybe he finally got his head on straight.

I have no such blood line, my kid is above average but still developing, and I got called by a highly credentialed advisor earlier this year. He heard about my kid from a coach we both know, and is now helping us. Meaning, if he develops, he won't go unnoticed.

My kid sees me making connections all the time - leaving positive impressions with guys with strong connections in the sport. I'm friendly with at least a half dozen guys with NHL teams and D1 college coaches on their cell phones that wouldn't hesitate for a second to help us out when the time comes, if I asked. Why? Because I'm nice to people, I'm considerate of them, my kid has a great attitude and works his butt off every day, and everybody that works with him know it. People like to help people that they like.

And I'm protective of those relationships. I'm not asking for favors now, because we don't need favors now.

So, it's not a lie. It's just that most parents don't understand that the saying "what goes around comes around" can be good, as well as bad.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

"I'm friendly with at least a half dozen guys with NHL teams and D1 college coaches on their cell phones that wouldn't hesitate for a second to help us out."

So you're connected, move to the middle of the line. And then let us all know how it ends up.



Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Anon
So you're connected, move to the middle of the line. And then let us all know how it ends up.
Yeah, with the point being, you can develop those connections all on your own.

And, you're right, too soon to tell. But, it won't be because he didn't get seen.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Anon
Anon
THE biggest lie in hockey that has been told for generations is: "If you're a good player, we'll find you."

Maybe it should be restated; "If you are connected, your father or uncle played in the NHL, your dad is a D-1 coach, an NHL scout or an NHL front office employee, if your blood line is scattered with D-1 and NHL DNA or your brother is already onboard, if you played in the right program or for the right coaches and went to the right camps we will find you."

The differences between D-1 and top-end D-3 is so slim. Look at the legacy kids who get moved along while everyone else scratches their heads and know if the back of the kid's sweater said "Kaplinski" instead of "NHL Offspring" the kid would have faded from the scene as he graduated high school.

How about the story of the local kid that played public h.s. hockey and went out to the Midwest on his own and the USHL coaches said, "Kid, where have you been?" Local experts and local high school coaches all missed it evidently. They didn't "find him."
Then that kid's father didn't do enough to help his kid. And I highly doubt he went "unnoticed" by his coaches - more likely, they didn't feel the need to help him. Maybe he was just a late bloomer. Maybe he finally got his head on straight.

I have no such blood line, my kid is above average but still developing, and I got called by a highly credentialed advisor earlier this year. He heard about my kid from a coach we both know, and is now helping us. Meaning, if he develops, he won't go unnoticed.

My kid sees me making connections all the time - leaving positive impressions with guys with strong connections in the sport. I'm friendly with at least a half dozen guys with NHL teams and D1 college coaches on their cell phones that wouldn't hesitate for a second to help us out when the time comes, if I asked. Why? Because I'm nice to people, I'm considerate of them, my kid has a great attitude and works his butt off every day, and everybody that works with him know it. People like to help people that they like.

And I'm protective of those relationships. I'm not asking for favors now, because we don't need favors now.

So, it's not a lie. It's just that most parents don't understand that the saying "what goes around comes around" can be good, as well as bad.


You should teach a class--"Schmoozing for hockey success" You just proved the other guy's case against the "if you're a food player we will find you" malarkey.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

anon
You should teach a class--"Schmoozing for hockey success" You just proved the other guy's case against the "if you're a food player we will find you" malarkey.
If you think that is just the key for hockey success, I'm willing to bet you are stuck in a dead end job, or among the 35% of unemployable Americans, hating life. It is ALL about networking, and making connections, and promoting yourself.

Yes, the days of scouts driving around the midwest looking for a guy dribbling a ball on a bare patch of dirt with a basketball hoop are over. You have to make yourself accessible. If that's proving the guy's point, then so be it.

"You make your own luck. You know what makes a good loser? Practice."

- - Ernest Hemingway

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Anon
anon
You should teach a class--"Schmoozing for hockey success" You just proved the other guy's case against the "if you're a food player we will find you" malarkey.
If you think that is just the key for hockey success, I'm willing to bet you are stuck in a dead end job, or among the 35% of unemployable Americans, hating life. It is ALL about networking, and making connections, and promoting yourself.

Yes, the days of scouts driving around the midwest looking for a guy dribbling a ball on a bare patch of dirt with a basketball hoop are over. You have to make yourself accessible. If that's proving the guy's point, then so be it.

"You make your own luck. You know what makes a good loser? Practice."

- - Ernest Hemingway


"Shmoozing for Hockey Success: How to get your mediocre player into a mediocre NCAA program". If you've got to work that hard to get your kid noticed its because he's not worth watching.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

You must have a kid under the age of 15.... Wait and see, you will be amazed how they stack the deck

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

The Dude
You must have a kid under the age of 15.... Wait and see, you will be amazed how they stack the deck


If your kid truly stands out he will be noticed. Problem is very few kids fit that description. Most kids are in the "middle" and that's when all the schmoozing can pay off, but to what purpose?

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Anon
Anon
THE biggest lie in hockey that has been told for generations is: "If you're a good player, we'll find you."

Maybe it should be restated; "If you are connected, your father or uncle played in the NHL, your dad is a D-1 coach, an NHL scout or an NHL front office employee, if your blood line is scattered with D-1 and NHL DNA or your brother is already onboard, if you played in the right program or for the right coaches and went to the right camps we will find you."

The differences between D-1 and top-end D-3 is so slim. Look at the legacy kids who get moved along while everyone else scratches their heads and know if the back of the kid's sweater said "Kaplinski" instead of "NHL Offspring" the kid would have faded from the scene as he graduated high school.

How about the story of the local kid that played public h.s. hockey and went out to the Midwest on his own and the USHL coaches said, "Kid, where have you been?" Local experts and local high school coaches all missed it evidently. They didn't "find him."
Then that kid's father didn't do enough to help his kid. And I highly doubt he went "unnoticed" by his coaches - more likely, they didn't feel the need to help him. Maybe he was just a late bloomer. Maybe he finally got his head on straight.

I have no such blood line, my kid is above average but still developing, and I got called by a highly credentialed advisor earlier this year. He heard about my kid from a coach we both know, and is now helping us. Meaning, if he develops, he won't go unnoticed.

My kid sees me making connections all the time - leaving positive impressions with guys with strong connections in the sport. I'm friendly with at least a half dozen guys with NHL teams and D1 college coaches on their cell phones that wouldn't hesitate for a second to help us out when the time comes, if I asked. Why? Because I'm nice to people, I'm considerate of them, my kid has a great attitude and works his butt off every day, and everybody that works with him know it. People like to help people that they like.

And I'm protective of those relationships. I'm not asking for favors now, because we don't need favors now.

So, it's not a lie. It's just that most parents don't understand that the saying "what goes around comes around" can be good, as well as bad.


Sorry your kid isn't very good, the bigger problem is that your kid will eventually have to take care of himself, or will your relationships take care of the rest of his life as well? Your an example of what's wrong with parents now a days.

Re: Mass State Hockey Coaches Association

Anon
Anon
Anon
THE biggest lie in hockey that has been told for generations is: "If you're a good player, we'll find you."

Maybe it should be restated; "If you are connected, your father or uncle played in the NHL, your dad is a D-1 coach, an NHL scout or an NHL front office employee, if your blood line is scattered with D-1 and NHL DNA or your brother is already onboard, if you played in the right program or for the right coaches and went to the right camps we will find you."

The differences between D-1 and top-end D-3 is so slim. Look at the legacy kids who get moved along while everyone else scratches their heads and know if the back of the kid's sweater said "Kaplinski" instead of "NHL Offspring" the kid would have faded from the scene as he graduated high school.

How about the story of the local kid that played public h.s. hockey and went out to the Midwest on his own and the USHL coaches said, "Kid, where have you been?" Local experts and local high school coaches all missed it evidently. They didn't "find him."
Then that kid's father didn't do enough to help his kid. And I highly doubt he went "unnoticed" by his coaches - more likely, they didn't feel the need to help him. Maybe he was just a late bloomer. Maybe he finally got his head on straight.

I have no such blood line, my kid is above average but still developing, and I got called by a highly credentialed advisor earlier this year. He heard about my kid from a coach we both know, and is now helping us. Meaning, if he develops, he won't go unnoticed.

My kid sees me making connections all the time - leaving positive impressions with guys with strong connections in the sport. I'm friendly with at least a half dozen guys with NHL teams and D1 college coaches on their cell phones that wouldn't hesitate for a second to help us out when the time comes, if I asked. Why? Because I'm nice to people, I'm considerate of them, my kid has a great attitude and works his butt off every day, and everybody that works with him know it. People like to help people that they like.

And I'm protective of those relationships. I'm not asking for favors now, because we don't need favors now.

So, it's not a lie. It's just that most parents don't understand that the saying "what goes around comes around" can be good, as well as bad.


Sorry your kid isn't very good, the bigger problem is that your kid will eventually have to take care of himself, or will your relationships take care of the rest of his life as well? Your an example of what's wrong with parents now a days.


Well put.