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Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Let the admissions folks know when you make your visit appointment that you'd like to meet the hockey coach if he's available. If your kid is being recruited by one school he should be on other school's radar already.

But, you should be more concerned about academic and cultural fit, not hockey. Truly and honestly, don't make your decision based principally on hockey. Season is 14 weeks, 20 hours a week. Doesn't matter how good his hockey experience is if he's miserable the rest of the time.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
Let the admissions folks know when you make your visit appointment that you'd like to meet the hockey coach if he's available. If your kid is being recruited by one school he should be on other school's radar already.

But, you should be more concerned about academic and cultural fit, not hockey. Truly and honestly, don't make your decision based principally on hockey. Season is 14 weeks, 20 hours a week. Doesn't matter how good his hockey experience is if he's miserable the rest of the time.


Understood. And agree that while hockey is the vehicle, it should not be the main factor. A coach I trust a lot has said as much too. But then again, assuming comfort and fit being somewhat equal, hockey will play a factor after all. I would think.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

more like - Doesn't matter how miserable his hockey experience is if he's happy the rest of the time.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon
Understood. And agree that while hockey is the vehicle, it should not be the main factor. A coach I trust a lot has said as much too. But then again, assuming comfort and fit being somewhat equal, hockey will play a factor after all. I would think.

OP, i think you are missing the point. very few prep schools (or even colleges) are the same. There are many variables: class size, comfort of sleeping quarters, bathroom facilities: by the room or floor, other activities, location (in the twigs, downtown, near water), class size, teaching methodology, and countless more. as for location -- Brooks is isolated from everything while Philips is within a mile of downtown. Assuming your son is boarding - those are far more important than any sport, which should be thought of as a bonus, it should not be on the list.

think of it this way, if he is miserable in class he will not be able to perform well on the ice.

i also agree with the others: if school X is interested others should be (or will be) as well.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
The first thing you need to do is get him scheduled to take the SSATs ASAP, because it will probably take more than one sitting. Understand that the SSATs, unlike the SATs that you remember, or that any older kids you have took, are much harder to do well on. They are only being administered to kids that are considering private secondary schools. So if 90% of kids don't take them, a 50th percentile SSAT score means that you are pretty much at the 95th percentile nationally.

Then, you need to have conversations with the academic advisors at your kid's current school or your town's HS to make sure that the school you're considering is a good "fit" fr your kid. They know the schools well, especially the ones closest to you. Prep schools are VERY different in terms of learning approach and how they expect the kids to spend their time. My kid can walk off campus any time he wants to get pizza. He even brought one back fore the class last month. At another school he'd probably receive detention (Hello, Mr. Hand).

You should plan to apply to more than one school - probably 4 or 5. You should get a sense of the culture, how well your kid will fit in, what kinds of things does that school see as important. Understand, they will be interviewing not just your kid, they will be interviewing you, too.

And, don't plan a lot during the holiday break, you and he are going to be very busy filling out the applications, writing responses to short answer questions (you, too) and 400 - 600 word essays.

Notice how I haven't mentioned anything about hockey yet?

The other reason you should apply to more than one school is you could get very different commitments from different schools in terms of a varsity spot, playing time (they can make your kid a scratch player like the NHL and he may not see the ice) and financial aid. Don't assume he will get aid. Some recruited kids don't. It has to be need based.

Getting admitted to more than one school is tough nowadays. Depending on the size of the school, they accept maybe 50 out of 1,200 applicants. Yes, the coach has say, but he doesn't have absolute say. I know a lot of kids that were recruited and didn't get in.

But, having choices gives you leverage. Very important to have. Very uncomfortable if you don't.


Some of your numbers are quite imaginary. 50% on the SSAT definitely indicates a better result than 50% on the SAT because many kids don't take the SSAT. But not every kid that takes it would be above the 90th percentile of the SAT. By your reasoning a kid who scored in the 10th percentile of the SSAT would be in the 91st percentile of the SSAT! There are lots of really smart kids in public schools who get way into the 90s on the SAT and don't take the SSAT. More likely your 50th percentile scorer on the SSAT would be in the high 60-70 range on the SAT. The only reason any of that matters is that different levels of prep schools generally have different levels of SSAT scores. There are schools for kids in the 90s and schools for kids in the 50s and schools for kids in between. Recruited athletes (and underrepresented minorities and legacies) generally can get in with lower scores than the rest of the students but not so much lower that they aren't considered able to do the work.

Also, your 50 out of 1200 --or 4%--admit rate is way too low. Exeter and Andover, which are probably the hardest schools to get into, both have average SSAT's of approximately 94% and still admit between 15-20% of their applicants. Other schools have slightly to significantly higher admission rates.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon
Some of your numbers are quite imaginary. 50% on the SSAT definitely indicates a better result than 50% on the SAT because many kids don't take the SSAT. But not every kid that takes it would be above the 90th percentile of the SAT. By your reasoning a kid who scored in the 10th percentile of the SSAT would be in the 91st percentile of the SSAT! There are lots of really smart kids in public schools who get way into the 90s on the SAT and don't take the SSAT. More likely your 50th percentile scorer on the SSAT would be in the high 60-70 range on the SAT. The only reason any of that matters is that different levels of prep schools generally have different levels of SSAT scores. There are schools for kids in the 90s and schools for kids in the 50s and schools for kids in between. Recruited athletes (and underrepresented minorities and legacies) generally can get in with lower scores than the rest of the students but not so much lower that they aren't considered able to do the work.

Also, your 50 out of 1200 --or 4%--admit rate is way too low. Exeter and Andover, which are probably the hardest schools to get into, both have average SSAT's of approximately 94% and still admit between 15-20% of their applicants. Other schools have slightly to significantly higher admission rates.
Your numbers are equally imaginary, because your fact base is the same as mine - personal opinion.

A lot of those "really smart kids" in public school do take the SSATs. They are among the record flood of applicants that preps are seeing these days that, in the end, Mom and Dad decide the aid isn't enough, or non-existent. Some of the "really smart kids" do leave the public system. I'm sure there are "really smart kids" that don't take the SSATs, so the real SAT rank of the median SSAT performer is somewhere between my imaginary numbers and your imaginary numbers.

As for the accept rate, the numbers I quoted are directly from a school my kid applied to year before last. Are yours from the schools themselves? Why would you lump them together like that? They are, after all, not one school. Hopefully you know that. But, regardless, since mine are fact-based, that makes them, well, not imaginary.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
anon
Some of your numbers are quite imaginary. 50% on the SSAT definitely indicates a better result than 50% on the SAT because many kids don't take the SSAT. But not every kid that takes it would be above the 90th percentile of the SAT. By your reasoning a kid who scored in the 10th percentile of the SSAT would be in the 91st percentile of the SSAT! There are lots of really smart kids in public schools who get way into the 90s on the SAT and don't take the SSAT. More likely your 50th percentile scorer on the SSAT would be in the high 60-70 range on the SAT. The only reason any of that matters is that different levels of prep schools generally have different levels of SSAT scores. There are schools for kids in the 90s and schools for kids in the 50s and schools for kids in between. Recruited athletes (and underrepresented minorities and legacies) generally can get in with lower scores than the rest of the students but not so much lower that they aren't considered able to do the work.

Also, your 50 out of 1200 --or 4%--admit rate is way too low. Exeter and Andover, which are probably the hardest schools to get into, both have average SSAT's of approximately 94% and still admit between 15-20% of their applicants. Other schools have slightly to significantly higher admission rates.
Your numbers are equally imaginary, because your fact base is the same as mine - personal opinion.

A lot of those "really smart kids" in public school do take the SSATs. They are among the record flood of applicants that preps are seeing these days that, in the end, Mom and Dad decide the aid isn't enough, or non-existent. Some of the "really smart kids" do leave the public system. I'm sure there are "really smart kids" that don't take the SSATs, so the real SAT rank of the median SSAT performer is somewhere between my imaginary numbers and your imaginary numbers.

As for the accept rate, the numbers I quoted are directly from a school my kid applied to year before last. Are yours from the schools themselves? Why would you lump them together like that? They are, after all, not one school. Hopefully you know that. But, regardless, since mine are fact-based, that makes them, well, not imaginary.


Sorry, no school admits only 4%. FYI, here's a "factual" link that has SSAT scores, admit rates,...etc. Just type in the school name and it will give you the numbers. Maybe you should have done a little independent verification and not just relied on a school's word before you wrote that big check....

http://www.boardingschoolreview.com/top-twenty-schools-listing/highest-average-ssat

Oh, and I was already giving you the benefit of the doubt insofar as the 60-70% was concerned. Most of the kids in NE boarding schools come from NE; I don't think many at all of the 90+ percentile kids from the rest of the country have even heard of the SSAT. What you said about a 50th percentile equating to a 95th percentile is clearly some sort of defensive mechanism you tell yourself, once more, while you write that big check. With those scores your kid is clearly Ivy League material. Good luck with that.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon
Anon
anon
Some of your numbers are quite imaginary. 50% on the SSAT definitely indicates a better result than 50% on the SAT because many kids don't take the SSAT. But not every kid that takes it would be above the 90th percentile of the SAT. By your reasoning a kid who scored in the 10th percentile of the SSAT would be in the 91st percentile of the SSAT! There are lots of really smart kids in public schools who get way into the 90s on the SAT and don't take the SSAT. More likely your 50th percentile scorer on the SSAT would be in the high 60-70 range on the SAT. The only reason any of that matters is that different levels of prep schools generally have different levels of SSAT scores. There are schools for kids in the 90s and schools for kids in the 50s and schools for kids in between. Recruited athletes (and underrepresented minorities and legacies) generally can get in with lower scores than the rest of the students but not so much lower that they aren't considered able to do the work.

Also, your 50 out of 1200 --or 4%--admit rate is way too low. Exeter and Andover, which are probably the hardest schools to get into, both have average SSAT's of approximately 94% and still admit between 15-20% of their applicants. Other schools have slightly to significantly higher admission rates.
Your numbers are equally imaginary, because your fact base is the same as mine - personal opinion.

A lot of those "really smart kids" in public school do take the SSATs. They are among the record flood of applicants that preps are seeing these days that, in the end, Mom and Dad decide the aid isn't enough, or non-existent. Some of the "really smart kids" do leave the public system. I'm sure there are "really smart kids" that don't take the SSATs, so the real SAT rank of the median SSAT performer is somewhere between my imaginary numbers and your imaginary numbers.

As for the accept rate, the numbers I quoted are directly from a school my kid applied to year before last. Are yours from the schools themselves? Why would you lump them together like that? They are, after all, not one school. Hopefully you know that. But, regardless, since mine are fact-based, that makes them, well, not imaginary.


Sorry, no school admits only 4%. FYI, here's a "factual" link that has SSAT scores, admit rates,...etc. Just type in the school name and it will give you the numbers. Maybe you should have done a little independent verification and not just relied on a school's word before you wrote that big check....

http://www.boardingschoolreview.com/top-twenty-schools-listing/highest-average-ssat

Oh, and I was already giving you the benefit of the doubt insofar as the 60-70% was concerned. Most of the kids in NE boarding schools come from NE; I don't think many at all of the 90+ percentile kids from the rest of the country have even heard of the SSAT. What you said about a 50th percentile equating to a 95th percentile is clearly some sort of defensive mechanism you tell yourself, once more, while you write that big check. With those scores your kid is clearly Ivy League material. Good luck with that.



Actually it is more like 30 percent overseas students, 40 percent New England, 30percent other

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

International average, from the same website, is 20%. Average day students (at boarding schools--100% at day schools) is 32%. If half of rest from NE, which is likely low, then 56% are from NE and 24% from rest of country. All of NE is approximately 15 mm of population, the rest of the country 295 mm. Still think all the smart kids apply to prep schools?

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

That has absolutely NOTHING to do with what the OP was asking. But thanks for the random stats that anyone who looks up boarding schools can find! He didn't ask for your opinion of the whole process either. The first few who replied were spot on. Then there was the epic poster who just wanted to just give his biased opinion of applying to prep schools and not answer the OP question succinctly. It's ok not to post on every subject. Really we don't mind. Had to give his spin on the process and blow it all out of proportion! He obviously went through it and his kid didn't get in or didn't get and $$ and now he is bitter that he wasted time writing essays!

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon


Sorry, no school admits only 4%. FYI, here's a "factual" link that has SSAT scores, admit rates,...etc. Just type in the school name and it will give you the numbers. Maybe you should have done a little independent verification and not just relied on a school's word before you wrote that big check....

http://www.boardingschoolreview.com/top-twenty-schools-listing/highest-average-ssat

Oh, and I was already giving you the benefit of the doubt insofar as the 60-70% was concerned. Most of the kids in NE boarding schools come from NE; I don't think many at all of the 90+ percentile kids from the rest of the country have even heard of the SSAT. What you said about a 50th percentile equating to a 95th percentile is clearly some sort of defensive mechanism you tell yourself, once more, while you write that big check. With those scores your kid is clearly Ivy League material. Good luck with that.



Really, could you be more of a douchebag?? Pathetic

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

No Dog in This Fight
anon


Sorry, no school admits only 4%. FYI, here's a "factual" link that has SSAT scores, admit rates,...etc. Just type in the school name and it will give you the numbers. Maybe you should have done a little independent verification and not just relied on a school's word before you wrote that big check....

http://www.boardingschoolreview.com/top-twenty-schools-listing/highest-average-ssat

Oh, and I was already giving you the benefit of the doubt insofar as the 60-70% was concerned. Most of the kids in NE boarding schools come from NE; I don't think many at all of the 90+ percentile kids from the rest of the country have even heard of the SSAT. What you said about a 50th percentile equating to a 95th percentile is clearly some sort of defensive mechanism you tell yourself, once more, while you write that big check. With those scores your kid is clearly Ivy League material. Good luck with that.



Really, could you be more of a douchebag?? Pathetic


Ouch, the truth hurts I guess. The douchebag was the guy telling the OP that his kid had better be a genius (50th % on SSAT equivalent to 95th percentile of all students!!) and that even then its almost impossible to get into a school (4% admit rate!!), which is not true.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Walk around most prep schools and you tell me,(especially with the athlete kids) academically these kids are in the top 95% of all high school kids in America.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon
Walk around most prep schools and you tell me,(especially with the athlete kids) academically these kids are in the top 95% of all high school kids in America.



Financially definitely but academically...

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
anon
Walk around most prep schools and you tell me,(especially with the athlete kids) academically these kids are in the top 95% of all high school kids in America.



Financially definitely but academically...
Bringing this back to things that the OP should be thinking about....

As was already said, the schools are SO different that you can't say "prep school" and think that covers anything.

You have schools like Roxbury Latin and Middlesex that are academic feeders to the Ivy League. The athletes at those schools aren't going to get much aid purely because they are athletes, but they may because of need. And, they will be expected to meet the very rigorous academic standards. Whether the admit rate is 15% or 10% or 5%, it's really hard to get in, and they do absolutely see over 1,000 applicants a year, from all over the world.

Then you have the schools that are out there actively recruiting athletes nationally, even internationally, that may not be at the same academic standard as the non-athlete - the Belmont Hills, the Nobles, etc. The teams (more sports than hockey) dorm together, eat together, work out together, go to class together. They are there because alums donate more for winning teams. If you are not a recruited athlete at these schools, chances are you won't have a spot on Varsity. It's also now hard to move up from JV - they are more likely to recruit an upper class or PG public school stud than promote from within. You need to know that going in.

Then you have the schools like New Hampton and North Yarmouth Academy that have extremely high admit rates and aren't known for kids that are academically gifted.

And, you have dozens of schools that fall somewhere in the middle of those three categories.

So, when you say "prep school" you need to do a LOT of research before you decide.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

No Dog in This Fight
anon


Sorry, no school admits only 4%. FYI, here's a "factual" link that has SSAT scores, admit rates,...etc. Just type in the school name and it will give you the numbers. Maybe you should have done a little independent verification and not just relied on a school's word before you wrote that big check....

http://www.boardingschoolreview.com/top-twenty-schools-listing/highest-average-ssat

Oh, and I was already giving you the benefit of the doubt insofar as the 60-70% was concerned. Most of the kids in NE boarding schools come from NE; I don't think many at all of the 90+ percentile kids from the rest of the country have even heard of the SSAT. What you said about a 50th percentile equating to a 95th percentile is clearly some sort of defensive mechanism you tell yourself, once more, while you write that big check. With those scores your kid is clearly Ivy League material. Good luck with that.



Really, could you be more of a douchebag?? Pathetic


He should fit in well at parents weekend!

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
No Dog in This Fight
anon


Sorry, no school admits only 4%. FYI, here's a "factual" link that has SSAT scores, admit rates,...etc. Just type in the school name and it will give you the numbers. Maybe you should have done a little independent verification and not just relied on a school's word before you wrote that big check....

http://www.boardingschoolreview.com/top-twenty-schools-listing/highest-average-ssat

Oh, and I was already giving you the benefit of the doubt insofar as the 60-70% was concerned. Most of the kids in NE boarding schools come from NE; I don't think many at all of the 90+ percentile kids from the rest of the country have even heard of the SSAT. What you said about a 50th percentile equating to a 95th percentile is clearly some sort of defensive mechanism you tell yourself, once more, while you write that big check. With those scores your kid is clearly Ivy League material. Good luck with that.



Really, could you be more of a douchebag?? Pathetic


He should fit in well at parents weekend!


Absolutely!!

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

What started this whole kerfuffle was the guy who assumed all of the kids applying to prep schools are in the upper 10 percent of the general population in smarts. This simply is not the case, and overstates the talent of the prep school population. It was either a mistake, bad math, or over-inflated ego. That's up to the poster to determine.

Private schools are like club hockey. Sure there are many elite students, and you often get better resources and superior instruction, but there is a spot for almost anyone if you can write the check.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

You are wrong! Many don't need to write a check! I know 4 families whose kids were straight A's, full of personality and play 2 sports well and barely pay a dime!!

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
You are wrong! Many don't need to write a check! I know 4 families whose kids were straight A's, full of personality and play 2 sports well and barely pay a dime!!

No...you missed my point. Of course there are very talented kids that are being paid to attend. But what you say does not address my point that there are also plenty that are paying full freight and not in the top 10 percent (or worse) of the general population.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon
Anon
You are wrong! Many don't need to write a check! I know 4 families whose kids were straight A's, full of personality and play 2 sports well and barely pay a dime!!

No...you missed my point. Of course there are very talented kids that are being paid to attend. But what you say does not address my point that there are also plenty that are paying full freight and not in the top 10 percent (or worse) of the general population.
The point that you keep missing, even though like four people have latched onto it, is that the thread was about the kinds of things a noob parent should be thinking about. You've pounced on one aspect of an otherwise informative thread and keep beating it to death. To 10%, top quartile, top half, who cares?

Let. It. Go. He didn't start the "kerfuffle," you did.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon
anon
Anon
You are wrong! Many don't need to write a check! I know 4 families whose kids were straight A's, full of personality and play 2 sports well and barely pay a dime!!

No...you missed my point. Of course there are very talented kids that are being paid to attend. But what you say does not address my point that there are also plenty that are paying full freight and not in the top 10 percent (or worse) of the general population.
The point that you keep missing, even though like four people have latched onto it, is that the thread was about the kinds of things a noob parent should be thinking about. You've pounced on one aspect of an otherwise informative thread and keep beating it to death. To 10%, top quartile, top half, who cares?

Let. It. Go. He didn't start the "kerfuffle," you did.


The guy who took this post off-point was the one who implied that the kid had better be a genius (over 90th percentile) and, even then he had very little chance of getting into any prep school, which are both wrong and very misleading to a "noob parent". There are schools for kids up and down the IQ spectrum--even schools for kids with special needs--and even the hardest schools to get into admit kids at a much higher rate than that guy suggested was the case.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

The admit rate, SSAT percentile rank average and other stats are all available online but beware that they may be self-reported and manipulated to some extent. Colleges do the same for prestige ranking purposes.

As to the SSAT percentile score of your straight A public school kid it is true that a public school kid who ranks in the 90th percentile on national standardized tests may score as low as the 50th percentile in the math and verbal sections of the SSAT. This is partly because the group of kids taking the SSAT is self-selective, but also because the international kids are often years ahead in math and the kids who have attended independent primary schools are often years ahead in both math and language arts. Your 8th grader who is currently taking pre-algebra will compete against 8th graders currently taking pre-calc. Algebra and geometry are on the SSAT upper exam, and the verbal section requires knowledge of terms that your public school star will never have heard. It's a real eye-opener for the parent of a public school kid but they can't really compete in subject matter which they have not yet been taught. The reading comp score seems to be less teachable and your kid from the under-performing public should do fine if he is an avid reader.

As to admissions in general, being an FA applicant is a major handicap. If you are full pay and your kid fits the stats of the school then your chances are probably good unless the kid has a lousy interview and no ECs. If you are an FA applicant then your kid will have to be a real standout. That might be athletically, academically or artistically, and preferably more than one way. Amount of FA required is also important. Although this may lead your kid to a less prestigious school there is an argument to be made that it is better to be in the top 25% anywhere than in the bottom 25% at even the most prestigious school.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Ask yourself if prep is right for your kid and your family. It's big $$$ that will go up every year your kid is enrolled. They say it's need based but the reality is they will try to get every nickel from every family they can. Sure you will see stats that say most kids get aid and the "average" is $x but look at the tuition. Day schools are now in the 40's and boarding 60k. Can you really swing that for four years and then college? And if you think your kid is going to play D1, remember most kids get a 2/4 which on a $60K per year school means your still need $120K to pay for college.

Prep's can be great and worth the investment if your kid is going to maximize everything the school offers. If not, or you are going to jump to USHL or something else half way through, then there might be better options for your money.

Talk to every school you can and ask tough questions. Will he play right away? Many of the big boarding schools won't play freshmen much as they have to play all the PG's paying big bucks. What can you expect to pay? How will that change year to year once he is in the school. Remember that once your kid is enrolled, they have the leverage financially knowing it's unlikely you will take your kid out once he is in.

I'm sure most parents will tell you how great prep is and how much their kid loves it but most have chased it because that's what everyone else's kid was doing. The reality is many have been severely impacted financially and have huge regrets. Again, it all comes back to best fit for the kid and family. You really need to project out and say is my kid going to be that much better off justifying the investment and what is the opportunity cost you are giving up.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

OP here - Thanks all for all the input, the pros and cons - very much appreciated. Lots to think about. We have our first campus visit and interview scheduled for tomorrow.
We definitely will look at other schools too over the next couple of weeks. To be frank without a substantial aid package this is not going to happen anyway as I will not put be able to put up 50k annually over the 4 years. so we will see. Apart from that, the fact that interest is there from schools is pretty amazing in itself.

Again thanks, and I will keep you posted.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

OP and second responder (11:12) - at what age were you approached by the prep coaches (or after which grade), and was it completely unsolicited? Or did your sons attend a camp or have previous conversations with connected people?

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
OP and second responder (11:12) - at what age were you approached by the prep coaches (or after which grade), and was it completely unsolicited? Or did your sons attend a camp or have previous conversations with connected people?


OP here. completely unsolicited and it was beginning of 8th grade. as an update, we received another call from a different school this week.
from discussions with the admissions people it seems there is not much room for financial aid over what we would qualify, it seems to be all done online. we will see.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Some coaches get out and scout, few have the time to take in all that much so they leverage tournaments, giving talks to AAA teams that coaches set up for them, or simply emailing coaches for contacts of good players who might be seeking Prep as an option.

Don't get all that giddy or disappointed if your kid has or has not been recruited. It's not college and there are no scholarships. These schools have college like campuses with very small student bodies so they need kids to pay tuition. They have their formulas for the mix of kids that pay full v. get need based aid so if you think a headmaster is going to go before their BOD saying he has blown the FA budget on hockey players to eek out a few more wins your crazy.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

anon
Some coaches get out and scout, few have the time to take in all that much so they leverage tournaments, giving talks to AAA teams that coaches set up for them, or simply emailing coaches for contacts of good players who might be seeking Prep as an option.

Don't get all that giddy or disappointed if your kid has or has not been recruited. It's not college and there are no scholarships. These schools have college like campuses with very small student bodies so they need kids to pay tuition. They have their formulas for the mix of kids that pay full v. get need based aid so if you think a headmaster is going to go before their BOD saying he has blown the FA budget on hockey players to eek out a few more wins your crazy.


not sure what prompted the above explanations as no one on this thread was giddy or panicky - but thanks.

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

I can give you this advice from the few kids I have coached that have gone onto private HS or preps. 99% of the conversations went exactly like this

School/Coach: "would your kid be interested in coming to _________ to play hockey ? "

Parents: "yes, but we cant afford that for high school !"

School/Coach: "well, what do you think you could afford ? "

Parents " Probably around(insert low ball offer here) or we were paying $4000 for private middle school "

School/Coach: "SO you would play for 4k ?"

Parents: "Sure"

School/Coach : "He's in"

Parents to each other: "****, we should have said 2k"

Re: New to the prep school process - now what?

Anon
I can give you this advice from the few kids I have coached that have gone onto private HS or preps. 99% of the conversations went exactly like this

School/Coach: "would your kid be interested in coming to _________ to play hockey ? "

Parents: "yes, but we cant afford that for high school !"

School/Coach: "well, what do you think you could afford ? "

Parents " Probably around(insert low ball offer here) or we were paying $4000 for private middle school "

School/Coach: "SO you would play for 4k ?"

Parents: "Sure"

School/Coach : "He's in"

Parents to each other: "****, we should have said 2k"


Even the selects schools with huge endowments are not going to throw around financial aid like that. Yes, they will give deep discounts to some kids and almost free rides to other exceptional candidates , but certainly not so brazenly or at the coaches discretion