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Re: Back at it

Anon
Anon
There are 168 hours in a week. A player who can find 10 hours in the week to skate, work out and play a game or two will still have 158 hours for everything else. The pussification of our society.

Get the gear, swag, stickers for the car but can't find 10 hours a week to be a dedicated athlete.
Yeah, like the OP mentioned, I think the PARENTS get tired of all the planning, driving and rink time. The kid, being a kid, is going to want to do the least amount possible. So, like the summer reading assignment, it's a week before school and the 10 pages a day of that boring ass book that would have made it a non-event lead to cramming, with Mom an Dad driving the slacker to make up for lost time.

I have to tell you, I get the whole burnout thing, and I'm sure that will be the result for some kids. Maybe more so when it's too much too soon? All I know is my kid works harder every summer than the summer before and loves it more.


Great to hear! Keep it moving forward , keep life balanced and the player will less likely get burned out

Re: Back at it

Anon
Anon
There are 168 hours in a week. A player who can find 10 hours in the week to skate, work out and play a game or two will still have 158 hours for everything else. The pussification of our society.

Get the gear, swag, stickers for the car but can't find 10 hours a week to be a dedicated athlete.
Yeah, like the OP mentioned, I think the PARENTS get tired of all the planning, driving and rink time. The kid, being a kid, is going to want to do the least amount possible. So, like the summer reading assignment, it's a week before school and the 10 pages a day of that boring ass book that would have made it a non-event lead to cramming, with Mom an Dad driving the slacker to make up for lost time.

I have to tell you, I get the whole burnout thing, and I'm sure that will be the result for some kids. Maybe more so when it's too much too soon? All I know is my kid works harder every summer than the summer before and loves it more.

Building on this point...I think if your kid is left to his own devices and does not work on his game, then he probably doesn't have the love of the game needed to succeed at the highest levels. Just like if he can't find the time to do that summer reading, he probably isn't a great student...or at least will have a hard time balancing the commitments required to be a student athlete at the highest levels.

Not everyone is cut out to be a college hockey player. Most fail, all need to come up with an excuse. Burnout is a common one.

Re: Back at it

anon
Anon
Anon
There are 168 hours in a week. A player who can find 10 hours in the week to skate, work out and play a game or two will still have 158 hours for everything else. The pussification of our society.

Get the gear, swag, stickers for the car but can't find 10 hours a week to be a dedicated athlete.
Yeah, like the OP mentioned, I think the PARENTS get tired of all the planning, driving and rink time. The kid, being a kid, is going to want to do the least amount possible. So, like the summer reading assignment, it's a week before school and the 10 pages a day of that boring ass book that would have made it a non-event lead to cramming, with Mom an Dad driving the slacker to make up for lost time.

I have to tell you, I get the whole burnout thing, and I'm sure that will be the result for some kids. Maybe more so when it's too much too soon? All I know is my kid works harder every summer than the summer before and loves it more.

Building on this point...I think if your kid is left to his own devices and does not work on his game, then he probably doesn't have the love of the game needed to succeed at the highest levels. Just like if he can't find the time to do that summer reading, he probably isn't a great student...or at least will have a hard time balancing the commitments required to be a student athlete at the highest levels.

Not everyone is cut out to be a college hockey player. Most fail, all need to come up with an excuse. Burnout is a common one.
Points already made - except the one about a kid that doesn't like summer reading not being a great student. This is a hockey board - what percentage of male hockey players love to curl up with their assigned reading? Is it lower or higher than the percentage that are "great students?"

My guess, if you're being honest with yourself, is that 99 and 44/100ths of male hockey payers aren't voraciously attacking their summer reading. But many still do very well academically and actually do a better job of balancing the commitments, because they have to. The bookworm isn't spending 20+ hours a week paying a sport.

Personally, the whole summer reading thing is BS. If you are required to read something, and take notes, and it's graded, that is summer school. When I was growing up, one of the reasons you did well in your classes was so you didn't HAVE to go to summer school.

Re: Back at it

Anon
anon
Anon
Anon
There are 168 hours in a week. A player who can find 10 hours in the week to skate, work out and play a game or two will still have 158 hours for everything else. The pussification of our society.

Get the gear, swag, stickers for the car but can't find 10 hours a week to be a dedicated athlete.
Yeah, like the OP mentioned, I think the PARENTS get tired of all the planning, driving and rink time. The kid, being a kid, is going to want to do the least amount possible. So, like the summer reading assignment, it's a week before school and the 10 pages a day of that boring ass book that would have made it a non-event lead to cramming, with Mom an Dad driving the slacker to make up for lost time.

I have to tell you, I get the whole burnout thing, and I'm sure that will be the result for some kids. Maybe more so when it's too much too soon? All I know is my kid works harder every summer than the summer before and loves it more.

Building on this point...I think if your kid is left to his own devices and does not work on his game, then he probably doesn't have the love of the game needed to succeed at the highest levels. Just like if he can't find the time to do that summer reading, he probably isn't a great student...or at least will have a hard time balancing the commitments required to be a student athlete at the highest levels.

Not everyone is cut out to be a college hockey player. Most fail, all need to come up with an excuse. Burnout is a common one.
Points already made - except the one about a kid that doesn't like summer reading not being a great student. This is a hockey board - what percentage of male hockey players love to curl up with their assigned reading? Is it lower or higher than the percentage that are "great students?"

My guess, if you're being honest with yourself, is that 99 and 44/100ths of male hockey payers aren't voraciously attacking their summer reading. But many still do very well academically and actually do a better job of balancing the commitments, because they have to. The bookworm isn't spending 20+ hours a week paying a sport.

Personally, the whole summer reading thing is BS. If you are required to read something, and take notes, and it's graded, that is summer school. When I was growing up, one of the reasons you did well in your classes was so you didn't HAVE to go to summer school.

"Great" students do their summer reading and then some. Don't confuse good with great. That goes for hockey too, since we're on a hockey board.

Re: Back at it

Anon
I get the whole burnout thing, and I'm sure that will be the result for some kids. Maybe more so when it's too much too soon?
as a coach (youth to HS) and a parent (various and numerous sports) i would have a hard time finding a 'burnout' situation at the HS level. but it is very common to see a player realize 'its not going to happen' and move on. at the youth level i saw 'burnout' continually (including some talented players). guessing - at the younger ages its the parents that dictate (the team, the commitment, the ---everything), by the HS its the player.

Re: Back at it

OP asked for some pointers for kid to get ready for season:
Workout A
1. 15 sets of 45 second sprints with 30 second rest in between
2. Push ups 3 sets of 20
3. Pull ups 5 sets of as many as he can
4. Hamstring Stretch
5. 15-20 minutes stickhandling
Workout B
1. Quick 5 minute run or rollerblade
2. Body weight sumo squats 3 sets of 15
3. Body weight Single Leg Lunges 2 sets of 8 each leg
4. Hamstring Stretch
5. Shoot 100-200 pucks this day

Alternate A/B 6 days per week for 3-4 weeks...he will be ready