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Re: D-3 College Hockey

Anon
anon
I know Tier III Juniors isn't a top Junior team there Sparky. Let's just say the team was in Iowa and the league uses four letters.

And they were commended -

'Good for the kids that stayed with it and I hope they're enjoying their choice to keep going.'

'...and b) they stuck with it and that says a lot - they must really love the game.'

Maybe just go back, learn to read and then delete your critical post?


fraud, if you are trying to imply your kid made the ushl and now plays club you are lying. if your kid made even the NA he isnt playing club instead this year.


I personally know a kid who did this. South shore kid, one of the better defensemen while in high school, had the size, maybe one of the better skaters to come along in a while...Now to qualify the whole thing the kid is actually kind of a genius boy and many people wondered why he was giving so much time to sports all along and now he is just a full-time student. Good for him and yes some kids do take a pass on playing in college.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

There are 17 USHL teams. There are 60 D1 Hockey programs.

Just about every kid in the USHL will play D1.

Yes there are good D1 hockey programs at good schools.

Why again did your kid turn it down?

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
There are 17 USHL teams. There are 60 D1 Hockey programs.

Just about every kid in the USHL will play D1.

Yes there are good D1 hockey programs at good schools.

Why again did your kid turn it down?


Exactly, the guy is a fraud, his kid was probably invited to the tryout camp, but never went. And now that is kid got a sniff, he is assuming his kid was turning down college hockey offers.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

Anon
anon
There are 17 USHL teams. There are 60 D1 Hockey programs.

Just about every kid in the USHL will play D1.

Yes there are good D1 hockey programs at good schools.

Why again did your kid turn it down?


Exactly, the guy is a fraud, his kid was probably invited to the tryout camp, but never went. And now that is kid got a sniff, he is assuming his kid was turning down college hockey offers.
Why is it so hard for you guys to understand that some kids are not interested in delaying their entry into college - a gateway to the rest of their lives - until they are 20 or 21? Maybe he wants to be a doctor, which is a TREMENDOUSLY long and difficult journey, and adding two years onto that, living in someone's basement in the Midwest, isn't attractive to him.

I know it feels to you like a kid with a good shot at playing D1 is tearing up a winning Keno ticket, but he's really just exchanging one for another.

Sorry your kid got cut by his stretch school.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

And I suppose these geniuses beleive no kid has ever burned out of a sport at 17 or 18 years old. I know, because daddy has a dream the kid is suppose to suffer through it, move to Dubuque IA or Kearney NB and keep at it for a couple more years until he shows up a Western Michigan University as a 21 year old freshmen to play hockey instead of taking that spot at CalTech or M.I.T. at 17 years old. And what if the kid's academic scholarships are more than his 'maybe' 1/4th share of a hockey scholarship?

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
And I suppose these geniuses beleive no kid has ever burned out of a sport at 17 or 18 years old. I know, because daddy has a dream the kid is suppose to suffer through it, move to Dubuque IA or Kearney NB and keep at it for a couple more years until he shows up a Western Michigan University as a 21 year old freshmen to play hockey instead of taking that spot at CalTech or M.I.T. at 17 years old. And what if the kid's academic scholarships are more than his 'maybe' 1/4th share of a hockey scholarship?

If it's about making money (salary, scholarship, whatever), then the kids going to school early are the ones winning in the long run just about every time. And it is all about making a living, right?

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
anon
And I suppose these geniuses beleive no kid has ever burned out of a sport at 17 or 18 years old. I know, because daddy has a dream the kid is suppose to suffer through it, move to Dubuque IA or Kearney NB and keep at it for a couple more years until he shows up a Western Michigan University as a 21 year old freshmen to play hockey instead of taking that spot at CalTech or M.I.T. at 17 years old. And what if the kid's academic scholarships are more than his 'maybe' 1/4th share of a hockey scholarship?

If it's about making money (salary, scholarship, whatever), then the kids going to school early are the ones winning in the long run just about every time. And it is all about making a living, right?
No.

For me, it's about giving my son opportunities I didn't have, because of money. That reflects choices my dad made, and how many, many dads I know approach fatherhood.

Now, before anyone leaps to my living through my kid, that isn't what I'm saying. I was an elite athlete in two sports and played at a high level in a third, but in adulthood. As a kid, I quit sports to make $1.75 an hour at age 15, and I've worked ever since.

So, if my kids want to go straight to college, like the OP's kid chose to, I'm supportive. If they want to play Juniors until age 21, I'm supportive. If they want to be carpenters, I'm supportive. Financially, I've got their backs, no matter what.

What I've asked him for in return is to do the same for his kids.

So, no, it's isn't about making a living. It's about being happy.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

Anon
anon
anon
And I suppose these geniuses beleive no kid has ever burned out of a sport at 17 or 18 years old. I know, because daddy has a dream the kid is suppose to suffer through it, move to Dubuque IA or Kearney NB and keep at it for a couple more years until he shows up a Western Michigan University as a 21 year old freshmen to play hockey instead of taking that spot at CalTech or M.I.T. at 17 years old. And what if the kid's academic scholarships are more than his 'maybe' 1/4th share of a hockey scholarship?

If it's about making money (salary, scholarship, whatever), then the kids going to school early are the ones winning in the long run just about every time. And it is all about making a living, right?
No.

For me, it's about giving my son opportunities I didn't have, because of money. That reflects choices my dad made, and how many, many dads I know approach fatherhood.

Now, before anyone leaps to my living through my kid, that isn't what I'm saying. I was an elite athlete in two sports and played at a high level in a third, but in adulthood. As a kid, I quit sports to make $1.75 an hour at age 15, and I've worked ever since.

So, if my kids want to go straight to college, like the OP's kid chose to, I'm supportive. If they want to play Juniors until age 21, I'm supportive. If they want to be carpenters, I'm supportive. Financially, I've got their backs, no matter what.

What I've asked him for in return is to do the same for his kids.

So, no, it's isn't about making a living. It's about being happy.


Amen Brother. Plenty of time to earn a living and build a career. Want to play Jr's until 21? I say go for it. Retire at 75 instead of 73. No regrets!

Re: D-3 College Hockey

Anon
anon
anon
And I suppose these geniuses beleive no kid has ever burned out of a sport at 17 or 18 years old. I know, because daddy has a dream the kid is suppose to suffer through it, move to Dubuque IA or Kearney NB and keep at it for a couple more years until he shows up a Western Michigan University as a 21 year old freshmen to play hockey instead of taking that spot at CalTech or M.I.T. at 17 years old. And what if the kid's academic scholarships are more than his 'maybe' 1/4th share of a hockey scholarship?

If it's about making money (salary, scholarship, whatever), then the kids going to school early are the ones winning in the long run just about every time. And it is all about making a living, right?
No.

For me, it's about giving my son opportunities I didn't have, because of money. That reflects choices my dad made, and how many, many dads I know approach fatherhood.

Now, before anyone leaps to my living through my kid, that isn't what I'm saying. I was an elite athlete in two sports and played at a high level in a third, but in adulthood. As a kid, I quit sports to make $1.75 an hour at age 15, and I've worked ever since.

So, if my kids want to go straight to college, like the OP's kid chose to, I'm supportive. If they want to play Juniors until age 21, I'm supportive. If they want to be carpenters, I'm supportive. Financially, I've got their backs, no matter what.

What I've asked him for in return is to do the same for his kids.

So, no, it's isn't about making a living. It's about being happy.

Except to do as you suggest, you must first have the means.

School over sports wins every time, so nobody should ever be shamed for making that decision. Do not misunderstand me, I agree there are situations where putting off school can be the right decision, and I would support that for my kid if he had a realistic shot, but in doing so you are no question impacting the quality of their college experience and possibly their professional trajectory. The sooner they start putting money into the market, the better off they'll be when they are grown up and coaching their own kids.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
anon
And I suppose these geniuses beleive no kid has ever burned out of a sport at 17 or 18 years old. I know, because daddy has a dream the kid is suppose to suffer through it, move to Dubuque IA or Kearney NB and keep at it for a couple more years until he shows up a Western Michigan University as a 21 year old freshmen to play hockey instead of taking that spot at CalTech or M.I.T. at 17 years old. And what if the kid's academic scholarships are more than his 'maybe' 1/4th share of a hockey scholarship?

If it's about making money (salary, scholarship, whatever), then the kids going to school early are the ones winning in the long run just about every time. And it is all about making a living, right?
Not always true. I graduated high school at 17 (turned 18 that summer), went straight to college where I played college football. Graduated in 4 years at age 21 and entered the working world. I really, really wish I would have delayed going to college a couple of years until I really figured out what I wanted to do with my life.

Entering the working world as a 21 year old, I wasn't ready for that either. Looking back more than 20 years ago I wish I would have taken that opportunity I had to pursue Junior hockey for a couple of years. It would have provided structure I needed at that age and I still could have progressed my education by earning core credit classes at a community college. If hockey didn't work out, the worst case scenario is I enter college a few years older & wiser with some college credits under my belt.

As for schooling and undergraduate programs, you can go anywhere you want from any State University in the country if you work hard enough and apply yourself. My brother went to a Big 12 school for undergrad and ended up with a doctorate from MIT. My other brother went to a Big Ten school and got an advanced degree in Physical Therapy (we still joke he should have went to Med School as the requirements were almost as much).

If you take your shot at Juniors for a couple of years and enter college later it is not the end of the world. In fact, I think you will have more life experience, be more well rounded, better equipped, and have the maturity to be successful in college. Academics and athletics are not mutually exclusive, one can excel at both. Often times it is the structure athletics provides that aids in the academics rather than hinders it. Every study out there shows that kids that participate in high school sports, and those that participate in NCAA athletics, score higher than the average student.

Now if you are a kid who is going to neglect their education and just wants to play hockey, it really doesn't matter. Without hockey those kids would probably end up at community college or the local tech school after HS anyway. At least hockey might be the path for them to get a college education somewhere.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
There are 17 USHL teams. There are 60 D1 Hockey programs.

Just about every kid in the USHL will play D1.

Yes there are good D1 hockey programs at good schools.

Why again did your kid turn it down?
I guess it kills everyone's theories on club hockey as there are ex USHL'ers playing club hockey. Seems to be one big mash-up once they get out of high school now isn't it?

Re: D-3 College Hockey

Anon
anon
There are 17 USHL teams. There are 60 D1 Hockey programs.

Just about every kid in the USHL will play D1.

Yes there are good D1 hockey programs at good schools.

Why again did your kid turn it down?
I guess it kills everyone\'s theories on club hockey as there are ex USHL\'ers playing club hockey. Seems to be one big mash-up once they get out of high school now isn\'t it?

Because the kid never had the opportunity, it was just a dad making himself feel good about his kid only option is to play club hockey. BTW, produce a list of exUSHL players playing club?? Bet you can't fill one hand.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

Anon
Anon
anon
There are 17 USHL teams. There are 60 D1 Hockey programs.

Just about every kid in the USHL will play D1.

Yes there are good D1 hockey programs at good schools.

Why again did your kid turn it down?
I guess it kills everyone\\\'s theories on club hockey as there are ex USHL\\\'ers playing club hockey. Seems to be one big mash-up once they get out of high school now isn\\\'t it?

Because the kid never had the opportunity, it was just a dad making himself feel good about his kid only option is to play club hockey. BTW, produce a list of exUSHL players playing club?? Bet you can't fill one hand.
BTW, produce a list of kids who passed on the USHL now playing club hockey and that list is pretty extensive according to a local scout.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

Agree. Look at 3-4 kids per D-I ACHA team and you would have it and I'd assume all of those guys could play D-3 at most schools. Playing D-3 is a big commitment for very little return.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

My kid played DI (ecac), 2 years in the SPHL and is working now. I have other kids still playing, and I played.

A couple observations. The top 1 or 2 kids on some of the better DIII teams could easily play DI. The top couple Club kids might be able to make a bottom end DIII team.

Does that make you feel better? Club hockey is great social and recreational undertaking for a kid that still wants to skate after youth and High School hockey.

Not sure why the guy with the Club Hockey agenda is constantly on here pumping the ACHA. I don't think anyone's hockey goals on here are to end up in club hockey.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

I kind of agree with both guys. If you go today and watch a D-III game you'll see a wide range of players, some very good but often undersized for D-I. The hockey can be good to just O.K. Is it a stretch to make these teams outside of the most competitive? No it is not. Take the top 5-6 kids on a top 10 MIAA team and give them a couple years to grow and play juniors and 80%-90% of them will make a D-III team - maybe not a top 10 team but they will make a team. The kids who choose not to take this route, they can play club and have some fun and make some friends - who cares. To say there are kids playing club who can't play D-3 (had they chosen the junior route) is unequivocally wrong. I was thinking about this and looked into the Alabama club team and read some of the bios. You tell me. Some of these kids can out of the USPHL, NAHL, Canadian juniors with a pretty good resume - and to say they couldn't make a low level D-III team is just silly.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
I kind of agree with both guys. If you go today and watch a D-III game you'll see a wide range of players, some very good but often undersized for D-I. The hockey can be good to just O.K. Is it a stretch to make these teams outside of the most competitive? No it is not. Take the top 5-6 kids on a top 10 MIAA team and give them a couple years to grow and play juniors and 80%-90% of them will make a D-III team - maybe not a top 10 team but they will make a team. The kids who choose not to take this route, they can play club and have some fun and make some friends - who cares. To say there are kids playing club who can't play D-3 (had they chosen the junior route) is unequivocally wrong. I was thinking about this and looked into the Alabama club team and read some of the bios. You tell me. Some of these kids can out of the USPHL, NAHL, Canadian juniors with a pretty good resume - and to say they couldn't make a low level D-III team is just silly.
Nobody here cares about the Alabama Club hockey roster or your research.

Your kid is going to play club in the south. Awesome! Book a trip where it coincides with a football game and enjoy.

I don't understand why you keep posting it here. There is an ACHA message board.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

I have a kid who plays D-3 club hockey....and it is pretty terrible hockey. He didn't want to commit to juniors or playing and going to a crappy school so he plays club and it is terrible hockey. D-1 club might be a different animal but D-3 blows and he knows it.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
My kid played DI (ecac), 2 years in the SPHL and is working now. I have other kids still playing, and I played.

A couple observations. The top 1 or 2 kids on some of the better DIII teams could easily play DI. The top couple Club kids might be able to make a bottom end DIII team.

Does that make you feel better? Club hockey is great social and recreational undertaking for a kid that still wants to skate after youth and High School hockey.

Not sure why the guy with the Club Hockey agenda is constantly on here pumping the ACHA. I don't think anyone's hockey goals on here are to end up in club hockey.

That guys does it because he was doing it when his kid was playing youth hockey, have to keep pumping his kid's tires and writing those checks, now for club hockey

Re: D-3 College Hockey

I have a son who plays club hockey. No tire pumping needed. It's all for fun and enjoying the game - school comes first as it should be for college kids. I do wonder why some kids play marginal D-3 hockey at less than stellar schools. What's the use? Skate five days a week, bus rides all over the region, play not so good hockey, attending a school just so you can play all for no discount at the Bursars office. Why do it?

Re: D-3 College Hockey

anon
I have a son who plays club hockey. No tire pumping needed. It's all for fun and enjoying the game - school comes first as it should be for college kids. I do wonder why some kids play marginal D-3 hockey at less than stellar schools. What's the use? Skate five days a week, bus rides all over the region, play not so good hockey, attending a school just so you can play all for no discount at the Bursars office. Why do it?
Both parents are paying, so no difference there.

Only difference would be that maybe one kid has set a goal to play an NCAA sport and be part of a true college team and get a collegiate varsity letter.

The other guy decided to pursue a club level sport. Maybe his focus is on something else.

Re: D-3 College Hockey

Anon
anon
I have a son who plays club hockey. No tire pumping needed. It\'s all for fun and enjoying the game - school comes first as it should be for college kids. I do wonder why some kids play marginal D-3 hockey at less than stellar schools. What\'s the use? Skate five days a week, bus rides all over the region, play not so good hockey, attending a school just so you can play all for no discount at the Bursars office. Why do it?
Both parents are paying, so no difference there.

Only difference would be that maybe one kid has set a goal to play an NCAA sport and be part of a true college team and get a collegiate varsity letter.

The other guy decided to pursue a club level sport. Maybe his focus is on something else.

Yeah, I don't understand why anyone making Choice A has to dump on kids making Choice B. How about we respect the choices they make and assume they have their reasons?

My kid is a Junior in HS so the college process is starting in earnest. He has an outside shot at D-I but it would only come after playing Juniors. So, since we can't predict the future, we are developing two lists - one academic, one hockey.

And, guess what? A lot of the schools are on both lists! So, what's so bad about his making a decision that includes his passion? As long as he makes grades (he has so far), why would we not support his pursuing D-III hockey?

I can think of way more reasons TO support him than to not.

Just like you and your kid.

Hmmm, imagine that!