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Youth Hockey
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Re: When does it matter, and why?

my vote would be high school.

unless the player is very good they're not 'developing' for anything after that.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

Anon
my vote would be high school.

unless the player is very good they're not 'developing' for anything after that.


I agree with this. Once you get to high school age and are either playing for your high school or some kind of juniors team, no one is going to care about it or look at it. No college coach is going to seriously look at what a kid did as a squirt to determine if they are going to recruit them.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

winning is the reward for the hard work put in at practice, a player should always be developing whether it is youth, high school, juniors, college or pros. A player and coach always wants to win - losing sucks. Winning produces positive development, it makes a player and coach work harder to keep winning and developing.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

I think the other posters are missing something here. It always matters. I am not saying its life or death and i am not saying its win at all costs but winning and losing does matter at every age. If a team loses all the time the players get discouraged and a lot of them will quit. If they will all the time then the kids tend to get a little overzealous and the parents go nuts. A good balance of wins and losses not only makes the games more fun but will also drive the rights kids to work harder and that is where the development comes from. so , personally, it always matters.

now if you looking for an answer on when you think you kid will get looked at for some future advancement beyond HS then you may have to go back to Pee Wee's. Some kids start getting recruited and watched in middle school now. I thinks it is sad to have to do that but that is reality.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

The kids should play, act and want to win but really too many coaches, teams and parents think too much about winning. The kids are fine with a good close game and being on a competitive team. With that said, being on a top competitive team especially in the bigger tournaments will get the kid more attention...if that's a goal.

Bantam, Midget, high school really.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

Anon
Some kids start getting recruited and watched in middle school now.


logically that makes no sense and buying it even less so:

a college staff has only so many days/time to scout. there are how many junior and high school teams across the country (and Canada). There is simply no time to 'use' on ONE player in middle school. and if you see one -- they are either a family member or a friend.

back on topic winning:

for the player, matters in high school. to win, brings fans, fans bring notoriety and notoriety brings --- well big man on campus (even a small one). and if you stay in town that can last years.

for the coach --- winning states at ANY level brings cache (even for an assistant). the older the age group the better.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

beatcuff
Anon
Some kids start getting recruited and watched in middle school now.


logically that makes no sense and buying it even less so:

a college staff has only so many days/time to scout. there are how many junior and high school teams across the country (and Canada). There is simply no time to 'use' on ONE player in middle school. and if you see one -- they are either a family member or a friend.

back on topic winning:

for the player, matters in high school. to win, brings fans, fans bring notoriety and notoriety brings --- well big man on campus (even a small one). and if you stay in town that can last years.

for the coach --- winning states at ANY level brings cache (even for an assistant). the older the age group the better.


Logically it makes perfect sense since it happens.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

Beatcuff - you have no idea what you are talking about. Players do get recruited and do commit to college as early as middle school.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

Anon
Beatcuff - you have no idea what you are talking about. Players do get recruited and do commit to college as early as middle school.

Yes, but only the best of the best elite players. So for 99% of kids, it ain't happening in Middle School

Re: When does it matter, and why?

anon
Anon
Beatcuff - you have no idea what you are talking about. Players do get recruited and do commit to college as early as middle school.

Yes, but only the best of the best elite players. So for 99% of kids, it ain't happening in Middle School


Yes, and this is the problem with youth hockey. Far too many approach the sport as if their kid is in the top 0.1% and looking for that middle school commitment. Sure they say "my kid just wants to play all summer, leave me alone" and sure they say "the Brick will be a memorable experience for my child and I", but really they are thinking in their brain that their kid is going to get somewhere...by middle school.

And to bring it back to the money grab thread, there are people out there selling that dream, or should I say taking advantage of these misguided parents, and some of them can be legitimately be considered a money grab. I'm not saying don't play, but just don't be afraid to call it a money grab. I've put my son into plenty of tournaments that were money grabs because he wanted to play. That doesn't change the fact that they were money grabs. Buying a beer at Fenway is a huge money grab and I'm not going to stop doing that. But I'm also not going to ignore the fact that it's a money grab.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

anon
anon
Anon
Beatcuff - you have no idea what you are talking about. Players do get recruited and do commit to college as early as middle school.

Yes, but only the best of the best elite players. So for 99% of kids, it ain't happening in Middle School


Yes, and this is the problem with youth hockey. Far too many approach the sport as if their kid is in the top 0.1% and looking for that middle school commitment. Sure they say "my kid just wants to play all summer, leave me alone" and sure they say "the Brick will be a memorable experience for my child and I", but really they are thinking in their brain that their kid is going to get somewhere...by middle school.

And to bring it back to the money grab thread, there are people out there selling that dream, or should I say taking advantage of these misguided parents, and some of them can be legitimately be considered a money grab. I'm not saying don't play, but just don't be afraid to call it a money grab. I've put my son into plenty of tournaments that were money grabs because he wanted to play. That doesn't change the fact that they were money grabs. Buying a beer at Fenway is a huge money grab and I'm not going to stop doing that. But I'm also not going to ignore the fact that it's a money grab.


This is idiotic. How is buying beer at Fenway a money grab, but buying beer somewhere else isn't.

Please enlighten us on what is a legitimate money grab vs. a an illegitimate money grab.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

Anon
anon
anon
Anon
Beatcuff - you have no idea what you are talking about. Players do get recruited and do commit to college as early as middle school.

Yes, but only the best of the best elite players. So for 99% of kids, it ain't happening in Middle School


Yes, and this is the problem with youth hockey. Far too many approach the sport as if their kid is in the top 0.1% and looking for that middle school commitment. Sure they say "my kid just wants to play all summer, leave me alone" and sure they say "the Brick will be a memorable experience for my child and I", but really they are thinking in their brain that their kid is going to get somewhere...by middle school.

And to bring it back to the money grab thread, there are people out there selling that dream, or should I say taking advantage of these misguided parents, and some of them can be legitimately be considered a money grab. I'm not saying don't play, but just don't be afraid to call it a money grab. I've put my son into plenty of tournaments that were money grabs because he wanted to play. That doesn't change the fact that they were money grabs. Buying a beer at Fenway is a huge money grab and I'm not going to stop doing that. But I'm also not going to ignore the fact that it's a money grab.


This is idiotic. How is buying beer at Fenway a money grab, but buying beer somewhere else isn't.

Please enlighten us on what is a legitimate money grab vs. a an illegitimate money grab.


$11.00 for a Fenway Beer...Money Grab
$250.00 for a summer tourney...Money Grab
People are making way to much money at you're expense, i.e. they are grabbing your money. Not rocket science people. Pay if you like, it's you're money they're grabbing. So for all of those who cling to the hope of their kids getting "offers" as a middle schooler, its pretty simple, you're kid is 13 playing with other 13 year olds, they're not getting the mythical "offer" you speak of. If they're 13 playing with 16-18 year olds, then there may be a glimmer of hope. Until then, please stop the madness.

Re: When does it matter, and why?

Anon
anon
anon
Anon
Beatcuff - you have no idea what you are talking about. Players do get recruited and do commit to college as early as middle school.

Yes, but only the best of the best elite players. So for 99% of kids, it ain't happening in Middle School


Yes, and this is the problem with youth hockey. Far too many approach the sport as if their kid is in the top 0.1% and looking for that middle school commitment. Sure they say "my kid just wants to play all summer, leave me alone" and sure they say "the Brick will be a memorable experience for my child and I", but really they are thinking in their brain that their kid is going to get somewhere...by middle school.

And to bring it back to the money grab thread, there are people out there selling that dream, or should I say taking advantage of these misguided parents, and some of them can be legitimately be considered a money grab. I'm not saying don't play, but just don't be afraid to call it a money grab. I've put my son into plenty of tournaments that were money grabs because he wanted to play. That doesn't change the fact that they were money grabs. Buying a beer at Fenway is a huge money grab and I'm not going to stop doing that. But I'm also not going to ignore the fact that it's a money grab.


This is idiotic. How is buying beer at Fenway a money grab, but buying beer somewhere else isn't.

Please enlighten us on what is a legitimate money grab vs. a an illegitimate money grab.


Hey man, I'm not telling you to avoid any tournaments. I'm also not judging you for signing up for them. I'm just saying...don't pretend that some of them are not money grabs.

The money grab is a guy putting together a group of kids that are willing to pay a premium for something that is worth no more than the ice time, but with an implied promise that they will get "exposure".

Re: When does it matter, and why?

Anon
Beatcuff - you have no idea what you are talking about. Players do get recruited and do commit to college as early as middle school.


you made two statements in one, showing you do not understand the difference:

any player (parent) can 'commit' to any school they want. doing so does not make it so and has no standing.

commitments from coaches vary with each having its own 'standing'. there is a big difference from a coach SAYING "we'd love to have you play for us" v a coach handing a commitment document (and that only starts the process). yet many think/act as if they are the same.

fine maybe there is a player or two that were 'noticed' in middle school: the level of JE of Sabers and JW of CC and maybe you can name 10 (doubtful) but out of.... thousands... in this state alone. you know that CC had over 100 tryout? even then notice and talk and in writing are very different.

then again i have 'no idea', all my interactions with college coaches are... watching commitments being pulled are 'impossible'.

and so now you will 'pressure' your child because he is 'falling behind'. the other poster is correct your middle schooler has to stand out v top high school players to get 'noticed'.

how about enjoy the ride, it will be over way faster than you think. besides if he is really good enough what difference does it make if he gets his 'ticket' at 14, 17 or 19 -- he got it.