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Re: Good Team or Bad Team

anon
All Great Responses!

Another important consideration is the coach. How does he use the goalies in practice and how does he handle/view goalies? A coach who keeps goalies engaged at one end while team is working on skating/stick handling etc at the other end or are they idle the majority of the time? How does he incorporate goalies into practice? A lot of game like situations or rapid firing on shooting dummies?

I have seen it all. Typically a good coach across the board will also handle his goalies well ( par for the course), Stay away from the coaches who are dismissive if asked these questions or make comments like " They get plenty of attention at goalie training" They just don't get it!!

Goalies are a special breed. God Bless them. It sure ain't easy!


Good luck and enjoy.


Coaches usually don't address goalies for one main reason, they have no clue on how to coach it and quite frankly are afraid to. So they do nothing about it. All they know is "can he stop the puck?" They often say brilliant things like "don't give up any rebounds" but don't know how to teach rebound control etc. 2 suggestions I have made to coaches is this. Ask the goalie coaches about drills they can do or what to watch for in practice. Most organizations utilize goalie instructors and the head coach should know what they are reinforcing and teaching. Or, most goalies go to outside coaches. Ask the parents or ask the goalie coach what the kid is being thaught so they can reinforce the lessons. One thing a coach doesn't want to do is contradict the lessons. In other words, get involved and leave your comfort zone. Secondly, ask amongst the parents on the team if anyone has played the position. Sometimes just having someone who knows and can relate to the goalie is a big help in practice and in games. If there is a parent then they can put the kid through drills. This parent will be able to understand what is a bad goal or a good goal and be able to relate and talk to the goalie. Sometimes having this perspective can help as this parent will relate to the kid on a different level. I have found this to be a very productive method

Re: Good Team or Bad Team

Anon
anon
All Great Responses!

Another important consideration is the coach. How does he use the goalies in practice and how does he handle/view goalies? A coach who keeps goalies engaged at one end while team is working on skating/stick handling etc at the other end or are they idle the majority of the time? How does he incorporate goalies into practice? A lot of game like situations or rapid firing on shooting dummies?

I have seen it all. Typically a good coach across the board will also handle his goalies well ( par for the course), Stay away from the coaches who are dismissive if asked these questions or make comments like " They get plenty of attention at goalie training" They just don't get it!!

Goalies are a special breed. God Bless them. It sure ain't easy!


Good luck and enjoy.


Coaches usually don't address goalies for one main reason, they have no clue on how to coach it and quite frankly are afraid to. So they do nothing about it. All they know is "can he stop the puck?" They often say brilliant things like "don't give up any rebounds" but don't know how to teach rebound control etc. 2 suggestions I have made to coaches is this. Ask the goalie coaches about drills they can do or what to watch for in practice. Most organizations utilize goalie instructors and the head coach should know what they are reinforcing and teaching. Or, most goalies go to outside coaches. Ask the parents or ask the goalie coach what the kid is being thaught so they can reinforce the lessons. One thing a coach doesn't want to do is contradict the lessons. In other words, get involved and leave your comfort zone. Secondly, ask amongst the parents on the team if anyone has played the position. Sometimes just having someone who knows and can relate to the goalie is a big help in practice and in games. If there is a parent then they can put the kid through drills. This parent will be able to understand what is a bad goal or a good goal and be able to relate and talk to the goalie. Sometimes having this perspective can help as this parent will relate to the kid on a different level. I have found this to be a very productive method


I would second that. most coaches (HC and assistant coaches) have no clue how to develop goalies. and I agree it is difficult. it is difficult to structure practices so that goalies benefit. Sometimes it goes as far that coaches try to tell goalies to do something contradictory of what their goalie coach tells them to do.

Re: Good Team or Bad Team

I believe it's better to have a Defensive minded coach over an offense minded coach when it comes to goalies. I've seen both and it's pretty obvious the D coach can relate way more to the goalie.

Re: Good Team or Bad Team

Deez Nuts
I believe it's better to have a Defensive minded coach over an offense minded coach when it comes to goalies. I've seen both and it's pretty obvious the D coach can relate way more to the goalie.


might be true, if so I have not seen a defensive minded head coach in youth hockey. And even so, relating doesn't mean they can set up a practice so it benefits a goalie, nor can they coach goalie skills.

Don't get me wrong I am not upset about it, I just think it is a fact of hockey development.