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Youth Hockey
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Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
Anon


If your son can't hit a baseball or catch a lacrosse ball and does nothing but hockey, have at it. Better to have them engaged in something in the summer rather than sitting on the couch, eating cheese curls and playing video games. Just be forewarned that kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports, rarely have the necessary talent or desire to excel on the hockey rink either, so you're probably just throwing good money after bad if you have expectations of playing time in high school or beyond.
Because everyone knows those are the only two sports other than hockey.

Don't pretend you know anything about other people's kids and what makes them tick. It makes you look really dumb.


Notice the "kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports" there swifty. There are plenty of other sports...soccer,football,golf, tennis, track & field, rugby...baseball and lacrosse just happen to be the predominant spring sports. The fact of the matter is that if your kid has limited athletic ability and no real drive to try and compete, the likelihood they'll succeed on the hockey rink in high school or beyond is slim to none, so plan accordingly. Like it or not, the nature/nurture thing is real. What makes you look dumb is not being realistic about your own kids capabilities. That's your job as a parent. Once you hit high school, someone else will be making those decisions for you, so enjoy it while you can.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
Anon
Anon


If your son can't hit a baseball or catch a lacrosse ball and does nothing but hockey, have at it. Better to have them engaged in something in the summer rather than sitting on the couch, eating cheese curls and playing video games. Just be forewarned that kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports, rarely have the necessary talent or desire to excel on the hockey rink either, so you're probably just throwing good money after bad if you have expectations of playing time in high school or beyond.
Because everyone knows those are the only two sports other than hockey.

Don't pretend you know anything about other people's kids and what makes them tick. It makes you look really dumb.


Notice the "kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports" there swifty. There are plenty of other sports...soccer,football,golf, tennis, track & field, rugby...baseball and lacrosse just happen to be the predominant spring sports. The fact of the matter is that if your kid has limited athletic ability and no real drive to try and compete, the likelihood they'll succeed on the hockey rink in high school or beyond is slim to none, so plan accordingly. Like it or not, the nature/nurture thing is real. What makes you look dumb is not being realistic about your own kids capabilities. That's your job as a parent. Once you hit high school, someone else will be making those decisions for you, so enjoy it while you can.


In our local high school the varsity hockey players pretty much all play lax or baseball in the spring. A few might play soccer. I would venture to say none of them run track or play on the golf team. I don't imagine it's much different in most local high schools. Competitive, driven kids play competitive sports.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
In our local high school the varsity hockey players pretty much all play lax or baseball in the spring. A few might play soccer. I would venture to say none of them run track or play on the golf team. I don't imagine it's much different in most local high schools. Competitive, driven kids play competitive sports.
Haha, that's one of the funnier posts I've seen in a while. "Because it is what I know, it must mean that the entire world is the same."

And, let's model our kids' training after the habits of a public HS hockey team. Because we all know what great hockey is being played in the average MIAA program right now.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
Anon
In our local high school the varsity hockey players pretty much all play lax or baseball in the spring. A few might play soccer. I would venture to say none of them run track or play on the golf team. I don't imagine it's much different in most local high schools. Competitive, driven kids play competitive sports.


I fully agree with this guy. It's definitely the same in my town. Many lacrosse and baseball players on our successful hockey team. Not sure why you're so butthurt about talented lacrosse/baseball players. Have all your eggs in the hockey basket, do ya? Good luck with that. Let me know how it works out.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
Anon
In our local high school the varsity hockey players pretty much all play lax or baseball in the spring. A few might play soccer. I would venture to say none of them run track or play on the golf team. I don't imagine it's much different in most local high schools. Competitive, driven kids play competitive sports.
Haha, that's one of the funnier posts I've seen in a while. "Because it is what I know, it must mean that the entire world is the same."

And, let's model our kids' training after the habits of a public HS hockey team. Because we all know what great hockey is being played in the average MIAA program right now.


Good luck on your guaranteed recipe for a future D1 scholarship while looking down on all the pleebs.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon


If your son can't hit a baseball or catch a lacrosse ball and does nothing but hockey, have at it. Better to have them engaged in something in the summer rather than sitting on the couch, eating cheese curls and playing video games. Just be forewarned that kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports, rarely have the necessary talent or desire to excel on the hockey rink either, so you're probably just throwing good money after bad if you have expectations of playing time in high school or beyond.
Because everyone knows those are the only two sports other than hockey.

Don't pretend you know anything about other people's kids and what makes them tick. It makes you look really dumb.


Notice the "kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports" there swifty. There are plenty of other sports...soccer,football,golf, tennis, track & field, rugby...baseball and lacrosse just happen to be the predominant spring sports. The fact of the matter is that if your kid has limited athletic ability and no real drive to try and compete, the likelihood they'll succeed on the hockey rink in high school or beyond is slim to none, so plan accordingly. Like it or not, the nature/nurture thing is real. What makes you look dumb is not being realistic about your own kids capabilities. That's your job as a parent. Once you hit high school, someone else will be making those decisions for you, so enjoy it while you can.


In our local high school the varsity hockey players pretty much all play lax or baseball in the spring. A few might play soccer. I would venture to say none of them run track or play on the golf team. I don't imagine it's much different in most local high schools. Competitive, driven kids play competitive sports.


My kid only wants to play hockey , however he does run track in the spring , his love is hockey , however in all honesty he has a better chance at a track scholarship than hockey ......

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon


If your son can't hit a baseball or catch a lacrosse ball and does nothing but hockey, have at it. Better to have them engaged in something in the summer rather than sitting on the couch, eating cheese curls and playing video games. Just be forewarned that kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports, rarely have the necessary talent or desire to excel on the hockey rink either, so you're probably just throwing good money after bad if you have expectations of playing time in high school or beyond.
Because everyone knows those are the only two sports other than hockey.

Don't pretend you know anything about other people's kids and what makes them tick. It makes you look really dumb.


Notice the "kids that don't have the athletic abilities or the competitive drive to try and excel in other sports" there swifty. There are plenty of other sports...soccer,football,golf, tennis, track & field, rugby...baseball and lacrosse just happen to be the predominant spring sports. The fact of the matter is that if your kid has limited athletic ability and no real drive to try and compete, the likelihood they'll succeed on the hockey rink in high school or beyond is slim to none, so plan accordingly. Like it or not, the nature/nurture thing is real. What makes you look dumb is not being realistic about your own kids capabilities. That's your job as a parent. Once you hit high school, someone else will be making those decisions for you, so enjoy it while you can.


In our local high school the varsity hockey players pretty much all play lax or baseball in the spring. A few might play soccer. I would venture to say none of them run track or play on the golf team. I don't imagine it's much different in most local high schools. Competitive, driven kids play competitive sports.


My kid only wants to play hockey , however he does run track in the spring , his love is hockey , however in all honesty he has a better chance at a track scholarship than hockey ......


Put the scholarship talk aside. It's a pipe dream for most kids in any sport. Not getting money to play a college sport doesn't make your kid a failure. It's the norm. With that said, there are a ton of non scholarship track & field, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse (name the sport here)...spots available at countless colleges through out the country if kids want to put the work in and try to continue their athletic endeavors after high school. I get it, every kid that plays youth hockey wants to play at BC or BU and then go on to the NHL. What I don't get is why every youth hockey parent in the state thinks it's their kids God given right to get that hockey scholarship, and then proceed to the NHL without passing go. It's totally bizarre and irrational behavior. If your kid is consistently dominating his peers as a higher level Bantam player, continues that dominance as a Freshman and Sophomore varsity high school/prep player with kids that are now older, and gets invited to the USHL combine, than you clearly want to think about specialization. Until then, keep it real. I'm pretty sure your kids will thank you for it later.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Quote:

Put the scholarship talk aside. It's a pipe dream for most kids in any sport. Not getting money to play a college sport doesn't make your kid a failure. It's the norm. With that said, there are a ton of non scholarship track & field, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse (name the sport here)...spots available at countless colleges through out the country if kids want to put the work in and try to continue their athletic endeavors after high school. I get it, every kid that plays youth hockey wants to play at BC or BU and then go on to the NHL. What I don't get is why every youth hockey parent in the state thinks it's their kids God given right to get that hockey scholarship, and then proceed to the NHL without passing go. It's totally bizarre and irrational behavior. If your kid is consistently dominating his peers as a higher level Bantam player, continues that dominance as a Freshman and Sophomore varsity high school/prep player with kids that are now older, and gets invited to the USHL combine, than you clearly want to think about specialization. Until then, keep it real. I'm pretty sure your kids will thank you for it later.



I'm guessing your kid was invited to the USHL combine?

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

anon
Quote:

Put the scholarship talk aside. It's a pipe dream for most kids in any sport. Not getting money to play a college sport doesn't make your kid a failure. It's the norm. With that said, there are a ton of non scholarship track & field, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse (name the sport here)...spots available at countless colleges through out the country if kids want to put the work in and try to continue their athletic endeavors after high school. I get it, every kid that plays youth hockey wants to play at BC or BU and then go on to the NHL. What I don't get is why every youth hockey parent in the state thinks it's their kids God given right to get that hockey scholarship, and then proceed to the NHL without passing go. It's totally bizarre and irrational behavior. If your kid is consistently dominating his peers as a higher level Bantam player, continues that dominance as a Freshman and Sophomore varsity high school/prep player with kids that are now older, and gets invited to the USHL combine, than you clearly want to think about specialization. Until then, keep it real. I'm pretty sure your kids will thank you for it later.



I'm guessing your kid was invited to the USHL combine?


A lot of the spring / summer tournaments are for daddy coaches to finance their apring / summer family vacations.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

anon
Quote:

Put the scholarship talk aside. It's a pipe dream for most kids in any sport. Not getting money to play a college sport doesn't make your kid a failure. It's the norm. With that said, there are a ton of non scholarship track & field, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse (name the sport here)...spots available at countless colleges through out the country if kids want to put the work in and try to continue their athletic endeavors after high school. I get it, every kid that plays youth hockey wants to play at BC or BU and then go on to the NHL. What I don't get is why every youth hockey parent in the state thinks it's their kids God given right to get that hockey scholarship, and then proceed to the NHL without passing go. It's totally bizarre and irrational behavior. If your kid is consistently dominating his peers as a higher level Bantam player, continues that dominance as a Freshman and Sophomore varsity high school/prep player with kids that are now older, and gets invited to the USHL combine, than you clearly want to think about specialization. Until then, keep it real. I'm pretty sure your kids will thank you for it later.



I'm guessing your kid was invited to the USHL combine?

So the guy gives a measured and rational response to the thread, and all you got is a mindless jab at his kid? Come on man, you can do better than that.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

anon
anon
Quote:

Put the scholarship talk aside. It's a pipe dream for most kids in any sport. Not getting money to play a college sport doesn't make your kid a failure. It's the norm. With that said, there are a ton of non scholarship track & field, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse (name the sport here)...spots available at countless colleges through out the country if kids want to put the work in and try to continue their athletic endeavors after high school. I get it, every kid that plays youth hockey wants to play at BC or BU and then go on to the NHL. What I don't get is why every youth hockey parent in the state thinks it's their kids God given right to get that hockey scholarship, and then proceed to the NHL without passing go. It's totally bizarre and irrational behavior. If your kid is consistently dominating his peers as a higher level Bantam player, continues that dominance as a Freshman and Sophomore varsity high school/prep player with kids that are now older, and gets invited to the USHL combine, than you clearly want to think about specialization. Until then, keep it real. I'm pretty sure your kids will thank you for it later.



I'm guessing your kid was invited to the USHL combine?

So the guy gives a measured and rational response to the thread, and all you got is a mindless jab at his kid? Come on man, you can do better than that.


That was not a mindless jab at all. Actually it wasn't really much of a jab!

What you will see on this board ad nausem are parents who will make statements like this but in truth are chasing the same dream. More times than not though their kid has had some success and now they are able to make these lofty statements from their tower. My best guess is his kid has been invited to the USHL combine and therefore is now credible to offer up his advice. How about , you need to make a USHL roster and play 60% of the games. No make that 80% of the games than it is ok to chase it.

Dude, I hope his kid makes it. I hope your kid makes it. I like to see kids succeed, especially those ones who are good kids, dedicated, hard working, etc. What I don't like are elitists!

So the question begs Tower guy, did your kid get invited to the USHL combine?

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

anon
anon
anon
Quote:

Put the scholarship talk aside. It's a pipe dream for most kids in any sport. Not getting money to play a college sport doesn't make your kid a failure. It's the norm. With that said, there are a ton of non scholarship track & field, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse (name the sport here)...spots available at countless colleges through out the country if kids want to put the work in and try to continue their athletic endeavors after high school. I get it, every kid that plays youth hockey wants to play at BC or BU and then go on to the NHL. What I don't get is why every youth hockey parent in the state thinks it's their kids God given right to get that hockey scholarship, and then proceed to the NHL without passing go. It's totally bizarre and irrational behavior. If your kid is consistently dominating his peers as a higher level Bantam player, continues that dominance as a Freshman and Sophomore varsity high school/prep player with kids that are now older, and gets invited to the USHL combine, than you clearly want to think about specialization. Until then, keep it real. I'm pretty sure your kids will thank you for it later.



I'm guessing your kid was invited to the USHL combine?

So the guy gives a measured and rational response to the thread, and all you got is a mindless jab at his kid? Come on man, you can do better than that.


That was not a mindless jab at all. Actually it wasn't really much of a jab!

What you will see on this board ad nausem are parents who will make statements like this but in truth are chasing the same dream. More times than not though their kid has had some success and now they are able to make these lofty statements from their tower. My best guess is his kid has been invited to the USHL combine and therefore is now credible to offer up his advice. How about , you need to make a USHL roster and play 60% of the games. No make that 80% of the games than it is ok to chase it.

Dude, I hope his kid makes it. I hope your kid makes it. I like to see kids succeed, especially those ones who are good kids, dedicated, hard working, etc. What I don't like are elitists!

So the question begs Tower guy, did your kid get invited to the USHL combine?

OK maybe you're right. I assumed it was a snide retort. Let's see who is right and if Tower Guy responds.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

anon
Quote:

Put the scholarship talk aside. It's a pipe dream for most kids in any sport. Not getting money to play a college sport doesn't make your kid a failure. It's the norm. With that said, there are a ton of non scholarship track & field, soccer, football, baseball, lacrosse (name the sport here)...spots available at countless colleges through out the country if kids want to put the work in and try to continue their athletic endeavors after high school. I get it, every kid that plays youth hockey wants to play at BC or BU and then go on to the NHL. What I don't get is why every youth hockey parent in the state thinks it's their kids God given right to get that hockey scholarship, and then proceed to the NHL without passing go. It's totally bizarre and irrational behavior. If your kid is consistently dominating his peers as a higher level Bantam player, continues that dominance as a Freshman and Sophomore varsity high school/prep player with kids that are now older, and gets invited to the USHL combine, than you clearly want to think about specialization. Until then, keep it real. I'm pretty sure your kids will thank you for it later.



I'm guessing your kid was invited to the USHL combine?


Apparently some people will just never get it. I give up!

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

anon
bragging about your son playing varsity for a d 3 western mass school is embarrassing. You should have known these spring/summer tourneys are just for the fun of it. If you thought putting your kid in one of these tourneys was in the hopes of getting him recognized, then you my friend are the biggest loser of all. I sign my kid up for these tourneys, and yes, a little pricey, but its all because the kid wants to play. Has a blast and gets to meet kids he otherwise would not meet by sticking with the regular season team. Oh yea, just so you know, my kid is good. Really good. Yet has not had a sniff from a D1 program. ****, I must be doing something wrong!

Do they have hockey in western ma? Your kid is good, really good, are you sure?

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

Anon
Anon
Too much, they are a waste of both time & money.


Sorry your kid didn't get asked

Don't be too flattered by the invitation. They are asking you because they know you will pay. That's the sole prerequisite, talent secondary.

Re: Average cost of spring tournaments

so your kid got asked but you didnt want to waste your time and $??? Instead your boy sits home while you troll on the dboard... lucky him!!