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Youth Hockey
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Re: Learning how to compete?

Sorry your kid got cut. Just hang them up.

Re: Learning how to compete?

There's many factors to competing. Some kids just have more drive than others, some are faster than others with more energy. Those things are very important in competing. You can't expect your kid to bring their A game to every game at 11 but it should be most of the time.

Re: Learning how to compete?

You can't make your kid care. Let the natural consequences of their effort (or lack of) happen. Its the best thing they could learn from youth sports. I suspect if the parent(s) care less, that might help too.

Re: Learning how to compete?

It's either in the head or in the body. A lot of people just assume it's all in the head, and that laziness on the ice means the kid doesn't have the passion. Sometimes it's a lack of conditioning. Is your kid a good athlete? Is he a good runner? If your kid doesn't have the legs or cardio, he won't be able to go 100 on every shift.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Getting cut isn't fun, but it probably is the best way to figure out if a kid really wants it. If they care they will work harder and change. If it isn't for them, you will find that out as well.

Also, if the kid is struggling to compete, a lower level where they will be a top player will likely be better for their confidence and development. Parent's ego is usually what wrecks the experience for their kid.

In other words, stop babying the kid and let him fail.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Agree with the above. He may need to get cut, drop a level and play down next season. He'll get more touches, develop more and he'll be in a better position to show his compete level.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Anon
Agree with the above. He may need to get cut, drop a level and play down next season. He'll get more touches, develop more and he'll be in a better position to show his compete level.
Lack of compete is great reason to drop your kid to a lower level. Maybe the added confidence with slower paced hockey will give him the desire to compete more consistently.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Sometimes kids don’t realize they’re puck watching. My son was and didn’t realize it. I’d tell him you have to attack the puck and he said he was. I showed him some clips off LiveBarn and he realized he wasn’t. He’s now first to
The puck and is very aggressive. Sometimes it’s a psychological thing and they think they are.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Make him compete for food, for your approval, for basic necessities. Watch his compete level grow! Worked for us.

Re: Learning how to compete?

From what I've seen with two sons playing into peewee and bantam years is a player who doesn't have it in mites typically won't develop it.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Anon
From what I've seen with two sons playing into peewee and bantam years is a player who doesn't have it in mites typically won't develop it.
That's what I've seen as well. The kids who were good as youths tend to go on to be the better players. This forum seems to get up in arms about that though saying how much it all changes in puberty...so I guess somehow the players who didn't stand out as mites/squirts go on to dominate once they hit puberty? Why?

If you look at any of the players today who are good and going places in hockey they were likely very good as mites/squirts. That said, I don't think all stand out mites/squirts will go on to be good.

Re: Learning how to compete?

As someone who experienced watching Bantam hockey for the first time I can say for a fact that Puberty is a big game changer. My son is tiny and has to battle against kids that may already be a full foot taller if not more. see how much your little guy wants to compete knowing he is getting smashed into the boards for the third time in a shift. kids that get bigger faster suddenly have tons of confidence. Not to mention longer strides close sthe gap onthe faster tiny kids. Smaller kids have to put that out of their head. You see the real compete level when hitting starts.

Re: Learning how to compete?

anon
As someone who experienced watching Bantam hockey for the first time I can say for a fact that Puberty is a big game changer. My son is tiny and has to battle against kids that may already be a full foot taller if not more. see how much your little guy wants to compete knowing he is getting smashed into the boards for the third time in a shift. kids that get bigger faster suddenly have tons of confidence. Not to mention longer strides close sthe gap onthe faster tiny kids. Smaller kids have to put that out of their head. You see the real compete level when hitting starts.
From what I can see many of the good hockey players are not huge.

If your kid is tiny maybe he's not finished growing or you or your wife are tiny and you had to have known that he might be too. Genetics.

Re: Learning how to compete?

My kid is competitive about the size of his movements.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Compete level and talent are 2 very different things. I have a very talented daughter who is not quite Elite because her compete level is not consistent. Put her on the ice for drills and she stands out. During games she's good, but could be better if her competitiveness was better.

Re: Learning how to compete?

So move her down where she belongs

Re: Learning how to compete?

Wasn't talking about where my daughter belongs, just offering an opinion that there is a difference between talent and compete level. Her talent has taken her to to NEPSAC, since you brought it up. Not my choice to place her.

Re: Learning how to compete?

Westy
At what age should a player recognize they are not competing? My 2011 seems to be able to compete in certain situations during games but half the time can be considered lazy. In practice he looks to be working at 70%. Coaches have always been hard on him about competing, but it doesn't seem to stick. He is "on the bubble" again this year and I dont know if this is something that can be corrected at this point or how to correct it from a parent standpoint. Help is appreciated.
He is 11 years old. Not all 11 year olds are expected to compete like Crosby. Once he hits puberty, you will see a change. For now dont kill his love for the game by getting on him. In his mind he is doing the best he can.