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Re: Prep School Search

If money is not the deciding factor here are things to consider
Start with ssat scores-this gives you an idea which schools fit academically
Whats more important - Hockey or academics - you can have both but will you give a bit on one to get the other
Location-lots of good schools in New England-hopefully you can find one within an hour or two of home
Be realistic as to sons abilities- don't assume he will step into a top team and play from day one (or ever)


Re: Prep School Search

anon
If money is not the deciding factor here are things to consider
Start with ssat scores-this gives you an idea which schools fit academically
Whats more important - Hockey or academics - you can have both but will you give a bit on one to get the other
Location-lots of good schools in New England-hopefully you can find one within an hour or two of home
Be realistic as to sons abilities- don't assume he will step into a top team and play from day one (or ever)



What grade? Is he trying to get in as a 7th grader? Lots more spots. As a ninth grader there are a lot less spots (maybe 10) to get into the freshman class. Therefore, has he been approached by the coach? Is he being recruited? Also, recruited or not? If you are looking at an ISL school then you need the grades. A coach may be able to get a “B” student in (absolutely no “C”s) but he will be using a favor with admissions. Non ISL schools might have different academic requirements but you probably will still have to be recruited to increase your chances to enter the ninth grade. Finally, you may have to repeat a grade. Good luck !!!!!

Re: Prep School Search

anon
If money is not the deciding factor here are things to consider
Start with ssat scores-this gives you an idea which schools fit academically
Whats more important - Hockey or academics - you can have both but will you give a bit on one to get the other
Location-lots of good schools in New England-hopefully you can find one within an hour or two of home
Be realistic as to sons abilities- don't assume he will step into a top team and play from day one (or ever)


Assuming you are talking about HS, this is a great answer. Finally someone that's serious.

Re: Prep School Search

Take a listen to a coaches perspective..https://soundcloud.com/myhockeyrankings/episode-5-tim-whitehead

Re: Prep School Search

anon
Starting the search, any advice?


GRADES, GRADES, GRADES!

Re: Prep School Search

anon
anon
Starting the search, any advice?


GRADES, GRADES, GRADES!
Or GOALS, GOALS, GOALS! then GRADES, GRADES, GRADES! won't matter. They'll trip over each other for a NTDP prospect

Re: Prep School Search

Anon
anon
anon
Starting the search, any advice?


GRADES, GRADES, GRADES!
Or GOALS, GOALS, GOALS! then GRADES, GRADES, GRADES! won't matter. They'll trip over each other for a NTDP prospect

Sorry, I was talking about the other 98% of kids looking to get into a Prep. But good luck to the goal scorers that are good enough to get to NTDP.

Re: Prep School Search

Anon
Anon
anon
anon
Starting the search, any advice?


GRADES, GRADES, GRADES!
Or GOALS, GOALS, GOALS! then GRADES, GRADES, GRADES! won't matter. They'll trip over each other for a NTDP prospect

Sorry, I was talking about the other 98% of kids looking to get into a Prep. But good luck to the goal scorers that are good enough to get to NTDP.
You must be a Millenial to have taken that so literally.

My kid hates having his teammates in his classes because they slow everything down. Very few recruited kids are capable of handling the *real* Prep curriculum.

Meaning, literally, so that I stay in your comfort zone, you really don't need to worry about grades if your kid can play. It's a bonus to the school to have a true student athlete that the Admissions Dept. doesn't have to look the other way on.

Re: Prep School Search

I have no doubt many/most prep schools will bend over backwards to admit and give money to a top player. I have always wondered why? It's not like this is Alabama football. Hockey and all prep sports are not money makers. No one attends the games so its not like the alumni care very much. I love watching my sons team and have no problem if they stretch for some top players but i don't see whats in it for the school. A lot of the better schools could fill the place with smart kids, many of whom will be full pay. Would Exeter be less attractive to most people if the hockey team went 5 and 25? Can someone explain the reasoning?

Re: Prep School Search

anon
I have no doubt many/most prep schools will bend over backwards to admit and give money to a top player. I have always wondered why? It's not like this is Alabama football. Hockey and all prep sports are not money makers. No one attends the games so its not like the alumni care very much. I love watching my sons team and have no problem if they stretch for some top players but i don't see whats in it for the school. A lot of the better schools could fill the place with smart kids, many of whom will be full pay. Would Exeter be less attractive to most people if the hockey team went 5 and 25? Can someone explain the reasoning?
I don't know what school you're referring to, but the alumni DO go to games at my kid's school. And they donate more when the hockey and football teams are good.

The coaches absolutely act like it's NCAA hockey. Been like that for years.

So, like so many things, it comes down to greed and ego.

Re: Prep School Search

Anon
The coaches absolutely act like it's NCAA hockey...it comes down to greed and ego.
i think you nailed it x2. to get and retain top coaches you need to placate them. which in turns gets a good product for the alumni to crow about.

Re: Prep School Search

anon
I have no doubt many/most prep schools will bend over backwards to admit and give money to a top player. I have always wondered why? It's not like this is Alabama football. Hockey and all prep sports are not money makers. No one attends the games so its not like the alumni care very much. I love watching my sons team and have no problem if they stretch for some top players but i don't see whats in it for the school. A lot of the better schools could fill the place with smart kids, many of whom will be full pay. Would Exeter be less attractive to most people if the hockey team went 5 and 25? Can someone explain the reasoning?


Winning is a huge factor in school pride and feeling around campus. Cant really put a price on that. If you have a winning program you attract better players. Winning pulls student body and surrounding community together and enhances the school experience.

Re: Prep School Search

anon
anon
I have no doubt many/most prep schools will bend over backwards to admit and give money to a top player. I have always wondered why? It's not like this is Alabama football. Hockey and all prep sports are not money makers. No one attends the games so its not like the alumni care very much. I love watching my sons team and have no problem if they stretch for some top players but i don't see whats in it for the school. A lot of the better schools could fill the place with smart kids, many of whom will be full pay. Would Exeter be less attractive to most people if the hockey team went 5 and 25? Can someone explain the reasoning?


Winning is a huge factor in school pride and feeling around campus. Cant really put a price on that. If you have a winning program you attract better players. Winning pulls student body and surrounding community together and enhances the school experience.
Do you HAVE a kid in Prep School? Most have no idea how a given team is doing, and don't care one bit. And that's not just my kid's school, I can walk out of my office and ask two other Prep dads, they'll say the same thing. If they go to a game it's for the fun of hanging with their boarding friends, and if you asked them a week later who won and lost, let alone what the score was, they wouldn't know. A lot of them don't know what hockey is, or football, or baseball as it isn't played in their homeland.

Re: Prep School Search

Winning may help school spirit and going to a game may give the kids something fun to do but that is the case without a high level of hockey. If prep hockey was played at the level of division 3 mass hockey the kids would still enjoy rooting for their classmates at a game. My son plays on a better than average ISL team and I can tell you very few really care other than the players and their parents. I am not saying this as a knock on the school but it just makes me wonder why schools award money to top players when a hundred point rise in their average sat scores would do more to draw kids to the school than a high level hockey team.

Re: Prep School Search

It is really all about developing the school community culture. My son is a recent grad of a Keller division school and played hockey there for 4 years (3V, 1JV). The first thing I noticed about the school, and it was what attracted me most to the boarding school opportunity was the culture. The entire school community - students, faculty, admin, staff, and everyone else respected achievement. High levels of achievement in academics, arts, and athletics were all considered "cool".

At the local public school in New York, "cool" was cutting class, sagging your pants, and mouthing off to authority. Huge difference at prep schools.

A big part of this culture is the high level of proficiency at the sports the school competes in. For schools with 100 kids per grade, it is truly remarkable the level of competition maintained by the ISL schools in so many sports.

This culture is immediately recognizable by a certain group of target parents and it is like catnip to them. Completely irresistible. The schools clearly understand this and recognize the marketing value is priceless.

Re: Prep School Search

OP here. Thats a very god explanation. I can absolutely see that.

Re: Prep School Search

Rink Doosh
It is really all about developing the school community culture. My son is a recent grad of a Keller division school and played hockey there for 4 years (3V, 1JV). The first thing I noticed about the school, and it was what attracted me most to the boarding school opportunity was the culture. The entire school community - students, faculty, admin, staff, and everyone else respected achievement. High levels of achievement in academics, arts, and athletics were all considered "cool".

At the local public school in New York, "cool" was cutting class, sagging your pants, and mouthing off to authority. Huge difference at prep schools.

A big part of this culture is the high level of proficiency at the sports the school competes in. For schools with 100 kids per grade, it is truly remarkable the level of competition maintained by the ISL schools in so many sports.

This culture is immediately recognizable by a certain group of target parents and it is like catnip to them. Completely irresistible. The schools clearly understand this and recognize the marketing value is priceless.
How much of a role did SSAT scores play? If the kid is a B+ student with good character does a low SSAT rule them out?

Re: Prep School Search

Depends on the academic standards of the school. SSAT is very important in validating or exposing the elementary school grades. But it's only one metric. Grades/SSAT/Athletics/Extracurricular/Financial/Demographics all weigh on wheither or not the school want's your kid.

Re: Prep School Search

anon
Depends on the academic standards of the school. SSAT is very important in validating or exposing the elementary school grades. But it's only one metric. Grades/SSAT/Athletics/Extracurricular/Financial/Demographics all weigh on wheither or not the school want's your kid.
Hahaha, you failed to mention the two most important criteria - teacher recommendations and "the interview" of both the parents and the kid. Prep schools place way more importance on the qualitative aspects of the student than the quantitative: grades, scores, money, etc.

My kid went to a junior prep, he had quite a few classmates whose parents used influence and $$$ to get into that school, and were in for a rude awakening when their socially awkward kid stared at his shoes in his interview.

Re: Prep School Search

Yes, indisputable that the interview is more important than grades/money etc. Like they all expect a middle school kid to be a polished interviewer. And of course teachers that are asked to write letters of recomendation don't say all flowery things about the kid. Dope.

Re: Prep School Search

anon
Yes, indisputable that the interview is more important than grades/money etc. Like they all expect a middle school kid to be a polished interviewer. And of course teachers that are asked to write letters of recomendation don't say all flowery things about the kid. Dope.
You have no clue. Less than zero. Teachers don't write "letters of recommendation." Each teacher of each core subject has to provide comments on every kid that applies. It's part of the process - the part that you apparently aren't aware exists.

And yes, they DO expect middle school kids to be able to present themselves in an age-appropriate, "polished" way. Pay attention to what your kid is being asked to do - that has become a HUGE part of the middle school curriculum. The top 10% of a public middle school - you know, the ones that actually get accepted - know that.

Re: Prep School Search

Correction. U16 better than D-1 public. U18 better than CC and most privates.

Re: Prep School Search

Oh ok so teachers writing comments is not a letter of recommendation. Jeesh what a dope. All my kids have gone to an ISL prep school Pretty sure I'm aware of the process but thanks for playing.

Re: Prep School Search

anon
Oh ok so teachers writing comments is not a letter of recommendation. Jeesh what a dope. All my kids have gone to an ISL prep school Pretty sure I'm aware of the process but thanks for playing.
All that money, and nobody actually described the process to you. My guess is you write the checks but Mommy did all the paperwork.

Teachers' comments aren't commendations. They don't say anything bad about a kid, but they speak in "code." Johnny works hard, shows a lot of energy, things like that mean he isn't that great a student.

Re: Prep School Search

Yeah ok because teachers have no problem speaking in code about how their student's really not that good of student and the grades they have been given are therefore inflated. That speaks real well of the teacher who while speaking in code has to put their name on the "commendation". They also have no interest in seeing the kid move up and on as well as improving his or her schools stature through matriculation to prep schools. What a dope.

Re: Prep School Search

anon
Yeah ok because teachers have no problem speaking in code about how their student's really not that good of student and the grades they have been given are therefore inflated. That speaks real well of the teacher who while speaking in code has to put their name on the "commendation". They also have no interest in seeing the kid move up and on as well as improving his or her schools stature through matriculation to prep schools. What a dope.
Once again, you are showing how little involvement you have in your kids' education.

The grades aren't inflated, they are somewhat lower when a kid is "not that good of student." What you're missing is, it isn't about the "Three R's" any more. Learning today involves classroom interaction, critical thinking, oral presentation and gaining and demonstrating respect for others. Prep schools don't want the kid that sits in the back of the class playing with a fidget spinner and regurgitate memorized information that "tests well."

The reason a teacher won't commend (yes, "commendation" was intentional and appropriate use of the word) that student's academics on the application is, he/she won't be "improving his or her schools [sic] stature" when they struggle in Prep School. If they behave there the way they behaved in public middle school, it can actually hurt the chances when the next, more deserving kid applies to that same school.

But, keep posting. Love to see people that don't know when to keep their misspelled words to themselves.

Re: Prep School Search

Yes because all kids that have good grades, are good athletes, score well on placement tests could just end up sitting in the back of the classroom playing with themselves. The SSAT is so easy to just regurgitate memorized information that it takes teachers speaking in "code" to direct admissions offices from making bad decisions. OK Beavis, you win.

Re: Prep School Search

I agree with the poster who thinks the "code talking" allegation is hyperbole. Truly professional teachers, counselors, administrators, etc. have integrity and standards. They will not overstate or understate their genuine assessment of a student applicant or athlete. To do so only undermines credibility and professional reputation.

Moreover, if it were true, as the post seem to suggest, that the teacher comments are all sugar-coated, obligatory fluff with some subtle texture mixed in, amounting to "code talking", then why even bother making everyone go through the silly kabuki dance? This makes a mockery of the process!

I submit that what you describe as talking in code is really just how educated professionals communicate. The teachers expect any reader/user to be able to interpret the plain meaning of the multi-syllable, big words written.

Just because YOU need a dictionary, thesaurus, and google does not mean the teachers are talking code!

Re: Prep School Search

There's some truth to the code talking. The teacher has to be careful because what he or she writes is going to become public knowledge. If they come right out and say "this kid is a moron, and a jerk on top of that", it's not the greatest career move as the parents, aka taxpayers, aren't going to take that well and could become serious thorns in the side of that teacher and his/her career.

The phrase "damming(sic) with faint praise" is very applicable here. If a teacher likes and respects a student, they're going to be happy for them to be getting an opportunity at prep school, and will go above and beyond on the recommendation. Anything less than that - "works hard, able, solid student" - might as well be a "meh, whatever, I don't care one way or the other, the kid's ok but won't be adding anything special to your school", because that's how it's read in the admissions office.

Re: Prep School Search

Anon
There's some truth to the code talking. The teacher has to be careful because what he or she writes is going to become public knowledge. If they come right out and say "this kid is a moron, and a jerk on top of that", it's not the greatest career move as the parents, aka taxpayers, aren't going to take that well and could become serious thorns in the side of that teacher and his/her career.

The phrase "damming(sic) with faint praise" is very applicable here. If a teacher likes and respects a student, they're going to be happy for them to be getting an opportunity at prep school, and will go above and beyond on the recommendation. Anything less than that - "works hard, able, solid student" - might as well be a "meh, whatever, I don't care one way or the other, the kid's ok but won't be adding anything special to your school", because that's how it's read in the admissions office.
Finally. Thank you.

Re: Prep School Search

Right.... kind of like the code for a blind date who has "a good personality" (lol). When everyone understands it, it is not really a code.

I think what everyone understands is that there is recommendation "inflation" just like there is grade "inflation".

Similarly when you are a dinner guest, and you are asked, "how was the meal?". When everyone knows how to interpret the answer, it is not a code!

Re: Prep School Search

anon
Starting the search, any advice?
Unless your son is really smart, is a potential D1 player (according to someone other than you) and you have a lot of money, it's a long shot.