Ice Hockey DBoard

The Official New England Ice Hockey DBoard 


Click Here to Visit Our Facebook Page

email: icehockeydboard@yahoo.com

High School & Prep Hockey
Start a New Topic 
Author
Comment
View Entire Thread
Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
non
Taking into account the staggering number of private high school grads that attend selective colleges, it would be easy to conclude that going to a public school will be detrimental to your admissions chances. Yet, this would be a classic case of falling victim to selection bias. The vast majority of students at private schools (especially non-parochial ones) come from relatively affluent, educated families. To compare this set of students, with all of their inherent advantages and support networks to the general population would be absurd. In other words, the fact that 95% of prep school grads are college-bound compared to only 49% of public school grads has more to do with who attends private school than what the private school is actually doing for the child’s college prospects.

Of course, public schools vary greatly in quality. The dilapidated state of too many urban and rural schools in the United States is a well-chronicled tragedy. Yet a large number of suburban public high schools offer many of the amenities of a private school as well as a lineup of strongly credentialed, dedicated instructors (i.e., Green Hope High School in Cary or Myers Park High School in Charlotte). Opportunities abound for the motivated and talented attending public schools. AP courses are typically plentiful and public schools actually offer more opportunities for International Baccalaureate (IB) and dual-enrollment courses.

You may also gain an edge by being a big fish in a small pond, or if you prefer a less overused analogy, a gargantuan begonia in a miniature greenhouse. Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college. In other words, a student with a 1300 SAT at a public high school where the average SAT is 1000 will have an admissions edge over an equal student at a private school where 1300 is the average SAT score.

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/private-vs-public-hs/
Milton Academy - last years senior class ( <200 students) sent 50 graduates to Ivy League schools. The rest of the graduates went to elite colleges as well.

How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that's one of the "top colleges" listed. Count the numbers in the list and tell us how many from the graduating class are not accounted for. Come on man, use your f*ing brain.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
non
Taking into account the staggering number of private high school grads that attend selective colleges, it would be easy to conclude that going to a public school will be detrimental to your admissions chances. Yet, this would be a classic case of falling victim to selection bias. The vast majority of students at private schools (especially non-parochial ones) come from relatively affluent, educated families. To compare this set of students, with all of their inherent advantages and support networks to the general population would be absurd. In other words, the fact that 95% of prep school grads are college-bound compared to only 49% of public school grads has more to do with who attends private school than what the private school is actually doing for the child’s college prospects.

Of course, public schools vary greatly in quality. The dilapidated state of too many urban and rural schools in the United States is a well-chronicled tragedy. Yet a large number of suburban public high schools offer many of the amenities of a private school as well as a lineup of strongly credentialed, dedicated instructors (i.e., Green Hope High School in Cary or Myers Park High School in Charlotte). Opportunities abound for the motivated and talented attending public schools. AP courses are typically plentiful and public schools actually offer more opportunities for International Baccalaureate (IB) and dual-enrollment courses.

You may also gain an edge by being a big fish in a small pond, or if you prefer a less overused analogy, a gargantuan begonia in a miniature greenhouse. Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college. In other words, a student with a 1300 SAT at a public high school where the average SAT is 1000 will have an admissions edge over an equal student at a private school where 1300 is the average SAT score.

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/private-vs-public-hs/
Milton Academy - last years senior class ( <200 students) sent 50 graduates to Ivy League schools. The rest of the graduates went to elite colleges as well.

How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that's one of the "top colleges" listed. Count the numbers in the list and tell us how many from the graduating class are not accounted for. Come on man, use your f*ing brain.
So again, after you using my brain; Sixteen graduates to Harvard , 50 to Ivy's , 30 to NESCAC. That is about 50% of graduating class to Ivy's or what is traditionally considered in these parts as Small Ivy's. The remaining 50% were scattered amongst U Chicago, MIT, U Michigan, Stanford, Georgetown, Babson, etc.

Any person can be a great student, athlete, person while going to a public High school , matriculate to a state university and become very successful. Jack Welch would be one of many examples but lets not dismiss what a great opportunity it would be to go to one of these private schools.

BTW UMass/ Amherst- Jack Welch's Alma Mater - two Milton Graduates matriculated to.

Now you use your brain Slappy Mcsweatpants

Re: Prep School Decisions

“So again, after you using my brain“..... someone going hot and heavy on the 40s tonight!!!!

Neutral poster here. Not sure what you’re trying to message but your point is unclear. As far as the Donato hater not sure how relevant your comment is to this thread....

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
“So again, after you using my brain“..... someone going hot and heavy on the 40s tonight!!!!

Neutral poster here. Not sure what you’re trying to message but your point is unclear. As far as the Donato hater not sure how relevant your comment is to this thread....
Quote:

Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college.

Quote:
How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that's one of the "top colleges" listed.


My Response:

A
Anon
Apr 15, 2018 - 8:34AM
Quote Reply Re: Prep School Decisions
Anon
Anon
non
Taking into account the staggering number of private high school grads that attend selective colleges, it would be easy to conclude that going to a public school will be detrimental to your admissions chances. Yet, this would be a classic case of falling victim to selection bias. The vast majority of students at private schools (especially non-parochial ones) come from relatively affluent, educated families. To compare this set of students, with all of their inherent advantages and support networks to the general population would be absurd. In other words, the fact that 95% of prep school grads are college-bound compared to only 49% of public school grads has more to do with who attends private school than what the private school is actually doing for the child’s college prospects.

Of course, public schools vary greatly in quality. The dilapidated state of too many urban and rural schools in the United States is a well-chronicled tragedy. Yet a large number of suburban public high schools offer many of the amenities of a private school as well as a lineup of strongly credentialed, dedicated instructors (i.e., Green Hope High School in Cary or Myers Park High School in Charlotte). Opportunities abound for the motivated and talented attending public schools. AP courses are typically plentiful and public schools actually offer more opportunities for International Baccalaureate (IB) and dual-enrollment courses.

You may also gain an edge by being a big fish in a small pond, or if you prefer a less overused analogy, a gargantuan begonia in a miniature greenhouse. Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college. In other words, a student with a 1300 SAT at a public high school where the average SAT is 1000 will have an admissions edge over an equal student at a private school where 1300 is the average SAT score.

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/private-vs-public-hs/
Milton Academy - last years senior class ( <200 students) sent 50 graduates to Ivy League schools. The rest of the graduates went to elite colleges as well.

How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that's one of the "top colleges" listed. Count the numbers in the list and tell us how many from the graduating class are not accounted for. Come on man, use your f*ing brain.
So again, after you using my brain; Sixteen graduates to Harvard , 50 to Ivy's , 30 to NESCAC. That is about 50% of graduating class to Ivy's or what is traditionally considered in these parts as Small Ivy's. The remaining 50% were scattered amongst U Chicago, MIT, U Michigan, Stanford, Georgetown, Babson, etc.

Any person can be a great student, athlete, person while going to a public High school , matriculate to a state university and become very successful. Jack Welch would be one of many examples but lets not dismiss what a great opportunity it would be to go to one of these private schools.

BTW UMass/ Amherst- Jack Welch's Alma Mater - two Milton Graduates matriculated to.

Now you use your brain Slappy Mcsweatpants

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
Anon
non
Taking into account the staggering number of private high school grads that attend selective colleges, it would be easy to conclude that going to a public school will be detrimental to your admissions chances. Yet, this would be a classic case of falling victim to selection bias. The vast majority of students at private schools (especially non-parochial ones) come from relatively affluent, educated families. To compare this set of students, with all of their inherent advantages and support networks to the general population would be absurd. In other words, the fact that 95% of prep school grads are college-bound compared to only 49% of public school grads has more to do with who attends private school than what the private school is actually doing for the child’s college prospects.

Of course, public schools vary greatly in quality. The dilapidated state of too many urban and rural schools in the United States is a well-chronicled tragedy. Yet a large number of suburban public high schools offer many of the amenities of a private school as well as a lineup of strongly credentialed, dedicated instructors (i.e., Green Hope High School in Cary or Myers Park High School in Charlotte). Opportunities abound for the motivated and talented attending public schools. AP courses are typically plentiful and public schools actually offer more opportunities for International Baccalaureate (IB) and dual-enrollment courses.

You may also gain an edge by being a big fish in a small pond, or if you prefer a less overused analogy, a gargantuan begonia in a miniature greenhouse. Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college. In other words, a student with a 1300 SAT at a public high school where the average SAT is 1000 will have an admissions edge over an equal student at a private school where 1300 is the average SAT score.

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/private-vs-public-hs/
Milton Academy - last years senior class ( <200 students) sent 50 graduates to Ivy League schools. The rest of the graduates went to elite colleges as well.

How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that\'s one of the \"top colleges\" listed. Count the numbers in the list and tell us how many from the graduating class are not accounted for. Come on man, use your f*ing brain.
So again, after you using my brain; Sixteen graduates to Harvard , 50 to Ivy's , 30 to NESCAC. That is about 50% of graduating class to Ivy's or what is traditionally considered in these parts as Small Ivy's. The remaining 50% were scattered amongst U Chicago, MIT, U Michigan, Stanford, Georgetown, Babson, etc.

Any person can be a great student, athlete, person while going to a public High school , matriculate to a state university and become very successful. Jack Welch would be one of many examples but lets not dismiss what a great opportunity it would be to go to one of these private schools.

BTW UMass/ Amherst- Jack Welch's Alma Mater - two Milton Graduates matriculated to.

Now you use your brain Slappy Mcsweatpants
None of the college matriculation numbers that are disclosed by prep schools like Milton mean anything without more detail, i.e., how many of the kids accepted at Ivy league schools are athletes, legacies or "under-represented minorities"--which they will NEVER disclose. While Milton's numbers probably don't include many athletes, you can bet there's a whole lot of legacies and URM. And the athletes they do place in Ivies are likely there just to raise the Academic Index of whatever team they are on--i.e., they will be bench warmers whose grades are used to raise the team average so the real stars who would not otherwise be academically eligible can play.

If you think your white, middle-class, non-legacy, non-star athlete has any chance whatsoever of going to an Ivy from a place like Milton, you are fooling yourself. Without some "hook" he'll be lucky to get Babson, even if he's got a 4.0 and 1600. There are just too many strong kids coming out of the top Prep schools for Harvard, Yale,...etc. to take them all.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon
non
Taking into account the staggering number of private high school grads that attend selective colleges, it would be easy to conclude that going to a public school will be detrimental to your admissions chances. Yet, this would be a classic case of falling victim to selection bias. The vast majority of students at private schools (especially non-parochial ones) come from relatively affluent, educated families. To compare this set of students, with all of their inherent advantages and support networks to the general population would be absurd. In other words, the fact that 95% of prep school grads are college-bound compared to only 49% of public school grads has more to do with who attends private school than what the private school is actually doing for the child’s college prospects.

Of course, public schools vary greatly in quality. The dilapidated state of too many urban and rural schools in the United States is a well-chronicled tragedy. Yet a large number of suburban public high schools offer many of the amenities of a private school as well as a lineup of strongly credentialed, dedicated instructors (i.e., Green Hope High School in Cary or Myers Park High School in Charlotte). Opportunities abound for the motivated and talented attending public schools. AP courses are typically plentiful and public schools actually offer more opportunities for International Baccalaureate (IB) and dual-enrollment courses.

You may also gain an edge by being a big fish in a small pond, or if you prefer a less overused analogy, a gargantuan begonia in a miniature greenhouse. Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college. In other words, a student with a 1300 SAT at a public high school where the average SAT is 1000 will have an admissions edge over an equal student at a private school where 1300 is the average SAT score.

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/private-vs-public-hs/
Milton Academy - last years senior class ( <200 students) sent 50 graduates to Ivy League schools. The rest of the graduates went to elite colleges as well.

How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that\\\'s one of the \\\"top colleges\\\" listed. Count the numbers in the list and tell us how many from the graduating class are not accounted for. Come on man, use your f*ing brain.
So again, after you using my brain; Sixteen graduates to Harvard , 50 to Ivy\'s , 30 to NESCAC. That is about 50% of graduating class to Ivy\'s or what is traditionally considered in these parts as Small Ivy\'s. The remaining 50% were scattered amongst U Chicago, MIT, U Michigan, Stanford, Georgetown, Babson, etc.

Any person can be a great student, athlete, person while going to a public High school , matriculate to a state university and become very successful. Jack Welch would be one of many examples but lets not dismiss what a great opportunity it would be to go to one of these private schools.

BTW UMass/ Amherst- Jack Welch\'s Alma Mater - two Milton Graduates matriculated to.

Now you use your brain Slappy Mcsweatpants
None of the college matriculation numbers that are disclosed by prep schools like Milton mean anything without more detail, i.e., how many of the kids accepted at Ivy league schools are athletes, legacies or "under-represented minorities"--which they will NEVER disclose. While Milton's numbers probably don't include many athletes, you can bet there's a whole lot of legacies and URM. And the athletes they do place in Ivies are likely there just to raise the Academic Index of whatever team they are on--i.e., they will be bench warmers whose grades are used to raise the team average so the real stars who would not otherwise be academically eligible can play.

If you think your white, middle-class, non-legacy, non-star athlete has any chance whatsoever of going to an Ivy from a place like Milton, you are fooling yourself. Without some "hook" he'll be lucky to get Babson, even if he's got a 4.0 and 1600. There are just too many strong kids coming out of the top Prep schools for Harvard, Yale,...etc. to take them all.
Ha ha. Ok if thinking that makes you slerp better at night then so be it.

The point previously made was that it is easier to get into an elite college from a non elite high school which is kookie talk.

The second point was that Umass leads the mitriculation list at Milton Academy which is incorrect. Likely yes at Milton High School.

If a good athlete/student can get into MA and parlay it into an Ivy League education then kudos to him. It sounds like you believe we live in a futile society

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon
non
Taking into account the staggering number of private high school grads that attend selective colleges, it would be easy to conclude that going to a public school will be detrimental to your admissions chances. Yet, this would be a classic case of falling victim to selection bias. The vast majority of students at private schools (especially non-parochial ones) come from relatively affluent, educated families. To compare this set of students, with all of their inherent advantages and support networks to the general population would be absurd. In other words, the fact that 95% of prep school grads are college-bound compared to only 49% of public school grads has more to do with who attends private school than what the private school is actually doing for the child’s college prospects.

Of course, public schools vary greatly in quality. The dilapidated state of too many urban and rural schools in the United States is a well-chronicled tragedy. Yet a large number of suburban public high schools offer many of the amenities of a private school as well as a lineup of strongly credentialed, dedicated instructors (i.e., Green Hope High School in Cary or Myers Park High School in Charlotte). Opportunities abound for the motivated and talented attending public schools. AP courses are typically plentiful and public schools actually offer more opportunities for International Baccalaureate (IB) and dual-enrollment courses.

You may also gain an edge by being a big fish in a small pond, or if you prefer a less overused analogy, a gargantuan begonia in a miniature greenhouse. Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college. In other words, a student with a 1300 SAT at a public high school where the average SAT is 1000 will have an admissions edge over an equal student at a private school where 1300 is the average SAT score.

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/private-vs-public-hs/
Milton Academy - last years senior class ( <200 students) sent 50 graduates to Ivy League schools. The rest of the graduates went to elite colleges as well.

How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that\\\\\\\'s one of the \\\\\\\"top colleges\\\\\\\" listed. Count the numbers in the list and tell us how many from the graduating class are not accounted for. Come on man, use your f*ing brain.
So again, after you using my brain; Sixteen graduates to Harvard , 50 to Ivy\\\'s , 30 to NESCAC. That is about 50% of graduating class to Ivy\\\'s or what is traditionally considered in these parts as Small Ivy\\\'s. The remaining 50% were scattered amongst U Chicago, MIT, U Michigan, Stanford, Georgetown, Babson, etc.

Any person can be a great student, athlete, person while going to a public High school , matriculate to a state university and become very successful. Jack Welch would be one of many examples but lets not dismiss what a great opportunity it would be to go to one of these private schools.

BTW UMass/ Amherst- Jack Welch\\\'s Alma Mater - two Milton Graduates matriculated to.

Now you use your brain Slappy Mcsweatpants
None of the college matriculation numbers that are disclosed by prep schools like Milton mean anything without more detail, i.e., how many of the kids accepted at Ivy league schools are athletes, legacies or \"under-represented minorities\"--which they will NEVER disclose. While Milton\'s numbers probably don\'t include many athletes, you can bet there\'s a whole lot of legacies and URM. And the athletes they do place in Ivies are likely there just to raise the Academic Index of whatever team they are on--i.e., they will be bench warmers whose grades are used to raise the team average so the real stars who would not otherwise be academically eligible can play.

If you think your white, middle-class, non-legacy, non-star athlete has any chance whatsoever of going to an Ivy from a place like Milton, you are fooling yourself. Without some \"hook\" he\'ll be lucky to get Babson, even if he\'s got a 4.0 and 1600. There are just too many strong kids coming out of the top Prep schools for Harvard, Yale,...etc. to take them all.
Ha ha. Ok if thinking that makes you slerp better at night then so be it.

The point previously made was that it is easier to get into an elite college from a non elite high school which is kookie talk.

The second point was that Umass leads the mitriculation list at Milton Academy which is incorrect. Likely yes at Milton High School.

If a good athlete/student can get into MA and parlay it into an Ivy League education then kudos to him. It sounds like you believe we live in a futile society
No, I've lived it. At top schools. If you have no hook, good grades and scores don't matter because there are literally millions of kids who have those and are applying to the same colleges. Being a legacy, or URM or athlete are the most common hooks that get kids into top schools. I bet half of Milton's Harvard acceptances are legacies--its a Boston day/boarding school with lots of affluent local kids whose parent's are highly educated--meaning its likely that a bunch of them are Harvard grads. Close to half of the rest are probably URM--Milton is a highly diversified school and knows that the Ivies want URM so they can increase their diversity. Most of the rest are probably athletes of some sort. That's it.

Unless your kid does something else that's really special (e.g., world class concert pianist, started significant charity in free time,....etc.) they are in the same boat as all the other kids that don't have any special draw--including the millions of Asian kids who do nothing but study and will all have better grades or scores than your kid, if he does anything at all besides study, which is the case because he is presumably playing hockey. So send your kid to Milton, or somewhere like it, because you want them to get a better HIGH SCHOOL education, because they will. Just don't count on it translating to Ivy League. [Oh, and I haven't even touched on the full-pay advantage. You think the Ivies want to give your unspectacular kid any $$$? LOL. They'd rather give it to an unspectacular URM to get their diversity numbers up.]

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon
Anon
non
Taking into account the staggering number of private high school grads that attend selective colleges, it would be easy to conclude that going to a public school will be detrimental to your admissions chances. Yet, this would be a classic case of falling victim to selection bias. The vast majority of students at private schools (especially non-parochial ones) come from relatively affluent, educated families. To compare this set of students, with all of their inherent advantages and support networks to the general population would be absurd. In other words, the fact that 95% of prep school grads are college-bound compared to only 49% of public school grads has more to do with who attends private school than what the private school is actually doing for the child’s college prospects.

Of course, public schools vary greatly in quality. The dilapidated state of too many urban and rural schools in the United States is a well-chronicled tragedy. Yet a large number of suburban public high schools offer many of the amenities of a private school as well as a lineup of strongly credentialed, dedicated instructors (i.e., Green Hope High School in Cary or Myers Park High School in Charlotte). Opportunities abound for the motivated and talented attending public schools. AP courses are typically plentiful and public schools actually offer more opportunities for International Baccalaureate (IB) and dual-enrollment courses.

You may also gain an edge by being a big fish in a small pond, or if you prefer a less overused analogy, a gargantuan begonia in a miniature greenhouse. Studies have shown that when you control for scholastic ability, attending a school surrounded by fellow academic superstars actually has a negative effect on your admissions chances at an elite college. In other words, a student with a 1300 SAT at a public high school where the average SAT is 1000 will have an admissions edge over an equal student at a private school where 1300 is the average SAT score.

https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/private-vs-public-hs/
Milton Academy - last years senior class ( <200 students) sent 50 graduates to Ivy League schools. The rest of the graduates went to elite colleges as well.

How could you possibly make such an assertion about Milton matriculation when a simple search instantly shows that you are full of ****? https://www.milton.edu/admission/college-matriculations/ Do you think Umass Amherst is an elite college? And that\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s one of the \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\"top colleges\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\" listed. Count the numbers in the list and tell us how many from the graduating class are not accounted for. Come on man, use your f*ing brain.
So again, after you using my brain; Sixteen graduates to Harvard , 50 to Ivy\\\\\\\'s , 30 to NESCAC. That is about 50% of graduating class to Ivy\\\\\\\'s or what is traditionally considered in these parts as Small Ivy\\\\\\\'s. The remaining 50% were scattered amongst U Chicago, MIT, U Michigan, Stanford, Georgetown, Babson, etc.

Any person can be a great student, athlete, person while going to a public High school , matriculate to a state university and become very successful. Jack Welch would be one of many examples but lets not dismiss what a great opportunity it would be to go to one of these private schools.

BTW UMass/ Amherst- Jack Welch\\\\\\\'s Alma Mater - two Milton Graduates matriculated to.

Now you use your brain Slappy Mcsweatpants
None of the college matriculation numbers that are disclosed by prep schools like Milton mean anything without more detail, i.e., how many of the kids accepted at Ivy league schools are athletes, legacies or \\\"under-represented minorities\\\"--which they will NEVER disclose. While Milton\\\'s numbers probably don\\\'t include many athletes, you can bet there\\\'s a whole lot of legacies and URM. And the athletes they do place in Ivies are likely there just to raise the Academic Index of whatever team they are on--i.e., they will be bench warmers whose grades are used to raise the team average so the real stars who would not otherwise be academically eligible can play.

If you think your white, middle-class, non-legacy, non-star athlete has any chance whatsoever of going to an Ivy from a place like Milton, you are fooling yourself. Without some \\\"hook\\\" he\\\'ll be lucky to get Babson, even if he\\\'s got a 4.0 and 1600. There are just too many strong kids coming out of the top Prep schools for Harvard, Yale,...etc. to take them all.
Ha ha. Ok if thinking that makes you slerp better at night then so be it.

The point previously made was that it is easier to get into an elite college from a non elite high school which is kookie talk.

The second point was that Umass leads the mitriculation list at Milton Academy which is incorrect. Likely yes at Milton High School.

If a good athlete/student can get into MA and parlay it into an Ivy League education then kudos to him. It sounds like you believe we live in a futile society
No, I've lived it. At top schools. If you have no hook, good grades and scores don't matter because there are literally millions of kids who have those and are applying to the same colleges. Being a legacy, or URM or athlete are the most common hooks that get kids into top schools. I bet half of Milton's Harvard acceptances are legacies--its a Boston day/boarding school with lots of affluent local kids whose parent's are highly educated--meaning its likely that a bunch of them are Harvard grads. Close to half of the rest are probably URM--Milton is a highly diversified school and knows that the Ivies want URM so they can increase their diversity. Most of the rest are probably athletes of some sort. That's it.

Unless your kid does something else that's really special (e.g., world class concert pianist, started significant charity in free time,....etc.) they are in the same boat as all the other kids that don't have any special draw--including the millions of Asian kids who do nothing but study and will all have better grades or scores than your kid, if he does anything at all besides study, which is the case because he is presumably playing hockey. So send your kid to Milton, or somewhere like it, because you want them to get a better HIGH SCHOOL education, because they will. Just don't count on it translating to Ivy League. [Oh, and I haven't even touched on the full-pay advantage. You think the Ivies want to give your unspectacular kid any $$$? LOL. They'd rather give it to an unspectacular URM to get their diversity numbers up.]
Great insight! Thank You. My kid is a good student at good cc school. Hockey would be the only way he would ever even get a sniff at an ivy. If he played 12 varsity sports and hundred extracurricular activities still woyld never get in BUT with hockey maybe!! I get it. I also realize there is a huge inner workings going on. My point is for the non legacy athlete it is much easier coming from a prep school then hingham high

Re: Prep School Decisions

Lots of average students going the prep route because it's been ordained as the best path to college hockey. These kids don't magically turn into Ivy candidates because they now sit in a classroom doing drum circles with their awesome 8-person class. Just like they don't turn into D1 prospects just because they enroll in a prep school. Lots of families paying a big price for the hope of success, but success can be found in a wide range of places. It comes from the kid not from the school.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Lots of average students going the prep route because it's been ordained as the best path to college hockey. These kids don't magically turn into Ivy candidates because they now sit in a classroom doing drum circles with their awesome 8-person class. Just like they don't turn into D1 prospects just because they enroll in a prep school. Lots of families paying a big price for the hope of success, but success can be found in a wide range of places. It comes from the kid not from the school.
I'm not talking about those kids. I'm talking about the kid at Milton/Exeter/Andover/Groton, etc that pays $10k to go to school there, who excels in both the classroom and the field/rink. Is a good kid and finds his way from a middle class upbringing to an Ivy league education. This happens all the time! It is all about leveraging your strengths.

My point was if you get into a strong academic prep school with a nice financial package, do well in the classroom and in your sport then it will absolutely, positively help you get into a better college then if you stayed at your public high school.

How is this even disputable. Milton's graduating class is about 175 and 25% end up at Ivy's another 50% at small Ivy's and tier 1 colleges. The last 25% mostly schools I would be thrilled for my kids to attend.

These are not all wealthy kids. With endowments between $250 mil - $1 bill, these schools are able to offer reduced tuition to many, many kids. It does not mean the majority of the students do not come from privileged upbringings but it means we are not living in a futile society. Yet!

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
Lots of average students going the prep route because it\'s been ordained as the best path to college hockey. These kids don\'t magically turn into Ivy candidates because they now sit in a classroom doing drum circles with their awesome 8-person class. Just like they don\'t turn into D1 prospects just because they enroll in a prep school. Lots of families paying a big price for the hope of success, but success can be found in a wide range of places. It comes from the kid not from the school.
I'm not talking about those kids. I'm talking about the kid at Milton/Exeter/Andover/Groton, etc that pays $10k to go to school there, who excels in both the classroom and the field/rink. Is a good kid and finds his way from a middle class upbringing to an Ivy league education. This happens all the time! It is all about leveraging your strengths.

My point was if you get into a strong academic prep school with a nice financial package, do well in the classroom and in your sport then it will absolutely, positively help you get into a better college then if you stayed at your public high school.

How is this even disputable. Milton's graduating class is about 175 and 25% end up at Ivy's another 50% at small Ivy's and tier 1 colleges. The last 25% mostly schools I would be thrilled for my kids to attend.

These are not all wealthy kids. With endowments between $250 mil - $1 bill, these schools are able to offer reduced tuition to many, many kids. It does not mean the majority of the students do not come from privileged upbringings but it means we are not living in a futile society. Yet!
Are you speaking from actual experience or is this just your opinion?

Re: Prep School Decisions

"How is this even disputable. Milton's graduating class is about 175 and 25% end up at Ivy's another 50% at small Ivy's and tier 1 colleges. The last 25% mostly schools I would be thrilled for my kids to attend."

Several posters have already explained why it is not only disputable, but in fact an increased chance of ivy acceptance is the single most common misconception about prep school. Milton and other preps are selecting kids who are already on track for an elite college. That isn't development, it is drafting. If you don't trust those posts then ask an admissions director at the elite prep of your choice.

Here's a thread that discusses and explains the point https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/prep-school-parents/1877215-milton-college-matriculation-impact-of-hooks-legacy-development-athletic-recruiting-urm.html

Re: Prep School Decisions

Alanon
"How is this even disputable. Milton's graduating class is about 175 and 25% end up at Ivy's another 50% at small Ivy's and tier 1 colleges. The last 25% mostly schools I would be thrilled for my kids to attend."

Several posters have already explained why it is not only disputable, but in fact an increased chance of ivy acceptance is the single most common misconception about prep school. Milton and other preps are selecting kids who are already on track for an elite college. That isn't development, it is drafting. If you don't trust those posts then ask an admissions director at the elite prep of your choice.

Here's a thread that discusses and explains the point https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/prep-school-parents/1877215-milton-college-matriculation-impact-of-hooks-legacy-development-athletic-recruiting-urm.html
Not an Ivy league grad nor do I play one on TV. Not a blue blood but have grown up around them, been to prep school ( Throughout high school) on substantial aid as has my son. Obviously not a high earner!

Most of my comments are based on observation and some insight. If you are a very good ( D1 caliber athlete), a very good student you will have opportunities at very good prep schools and ergo very good colleges including Ivys. Does being a legacy help? Of course it does. Does being a Full Pay help? **** straight it does.

However, if you leverage what you have IT DOES OPEN DOORS. Perhaps that has not been your experience or your kids but it happens a lot. Probably more so in sports outside of hockey as it has become a rich kids sport.

Like I said, if it is easier for you to sleep at night and what the other likeminded posters agendas/experiences, more so resonates for you then knock yourself out.

Iv'e got names buddy!! :)

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Alanon
\"How is this even disputable. Milton\'s graduating class is about 175 and 25% end up at Ivy\'s another 50% at small Ivy\'s and tier 1 colleges. The last 25% mostly schools I would be thrilled for my kids to attend.\"

Several posters have already explained why it is not only disputable, but in fact an increased chance of ivy acceptance is the single most common misconception about prep school. Milton and other preps are selecting kids who are already on track for an elite college. That isn\'t development, it is drafting. If you don\'t trust those posts then ask an admissions director at the elite prep of your choice.

Here\'s a thread that discusses and explains the point https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/prep-school-parents/1877215-milton-college-matriculation-impact-of-hooks-legacy-development-athletic-recruiting-urm.html
Not an Ivy league grad nor do I play one on TV. Not a blue blood but have grown up around them, been to prep school ( Throughout high school) on substantial aid as has my son. Obviously not a high earner!

Most of my comments are based on observation and some insight. If you are a very good ( D1 caliber athlete), a very good student you will have opportunities at very good prep schools and ergo very good colleges including Ivys. Does being a legacy help? Of course it does. Does being a Full Pay help? **** straight it does.

However, if you leverage what you have IT DOES OPEN DOORS. Perhaps that has not been your experience or your kids but it happens a lot. Probably more so in sports outside of hockey as it has become a rich kids sport.

Like I said, if it is easier for you to sleep at night and what the other likeminded posters agendas/experiences, more so resonates for you then knock yourself out.

Iv'e got names buddy!! :)
I swear I'm not trying to dump on you. I think your posts are sincere and it appears that you've got personal experience. But you are arguing a point about middle class mobility through prep school attendance that you appear not to have fulfilled yourself. If your contention is accurate, then after receiving financial aid to attend prep school, you should now be a "high earner" and your son should be a full pay.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
Alanon
\\\"How is this even disputable. Milton\\\'s graduating class is about 175 and 25% end up at Ivy\\\'s another 50% at small Ivy\\\'s and tier 1 colleges. The last 25% mostly schools I would be thrilled for my kids to attend.\\\"

Several posters have already explained why it is not only disputable, but in fact an increased chance of ivy acceptance is the single most common misconception about prep school. Milton and other preps are selecting kids who are already on track for an elite college. That isn\\\'t development, it is drafting. If you don\\\'t trust those posts then ask an admissions director at the elite prep of your choice.

Here\\\'s a thread that discusses and explains the point https://talk.collegeconfidential.com/prep-school-parents/1877215-milton-college-matriculation-impact-of-hooks-legacy-development-athletic-recruiting-urm.html
Not an Ivy league grad nor do I play one on TV. Not a blue blood but have grown up around them, been to prep school ( Throughout high school) on substantial aid as has my son. Obviously not a high earner!

Most of my comments are based on observation and some insight. If you are a very good ( D1 caliber athlete), a very good student you will have opportunities at very good prep schools and ergo very good colleges including Ivys. Does being a legacy help? Of course it does. Does being a Full Pay help? **** straight it does.

However, if you leverage what you have IT DOES OPEN DOORS. Perhaps that has not been your experience or your kids but it happens a lot. Probably more so in sports outside of hockey as it has become a rich kids sport.

Like I said, if it is easier for you to sleep at night and what the other likeminded posters agendas/experiences, more so resonates for you then knock yourself out.

Iv\'e got names buddy!! :)
I swear I'm not trying to dump on you. I think your posts are sincere and it appears that you've got personal experience. But you are arguing a point about middle class mobility through prep school attendance that you appear not to have fulfilled yourself. If your contention is accurate, then after receiving financial aid to attend prep school, you should now be a "high earner" and your son should be a full pay.
I was a subpar student at a mediocre prep school that was pretty strong in my particular sport. I was there for every reason other than academics. I am hopeful my kids will do better.

We have enough experience and knowledge to understand how it works without knowing the secret handshake.

There were plenty of kids I knew growing up who came from middle class or lower backgrounds who went this route and the trend still continues today. Is it predominant ? No, not by a long shot but it is happening.

At the end of the day, a better education, at a better school for a middle class/ working class/ lower class athlete will open more doors then if he stayed at his public school and will include IVY league schools. Just not for your kid I guess.

Re: Prep School Decisions

My son was waitlisted at 2 schools, last week we received 2 offers, yesterday he was accepted at his second choice with the aid we needed.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
My son was waitlisted at 2 schools, last week we received 2 offers, yesterday he was accepted at his second choice with the aid we needed.
Congratulations! Stressful times, but that's how it often works

Re: Prep School Decisions

This is a really interesting thread. What people lose sight of is, is that I don't believe anyone thinks there is a magic pill to guarantee your child go Ivy, D1, or to a top paying job. One decision you make, like what HS you choose, or what 1/2 season team you play on, will not determine a child's success. "Success" is a combination of so many factors, some you can control, and some you can not. Be a good parent and role model, teach good morals, good work ethic, and how to be a good person. Do the best you can, encourage your child to do the best he/she can, and make the best decisions you can with the information and resources that you have. Good luck and stop criticizing people's decisions or justifying your own.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
This is a really interesting thread. What people lose sight of is, is that I don't believe anyone thinks there is a magic pill to guarantee your child go Ivy, D1, or to a top paying job. One decision you make, like what HS you choose, or what 1/2 season team you play on, will not determine a child's success. "Success" is a combination of so many factors, some you can control, and some you can not. Be a good parent and role model, teach good morals, good work ethic, and how to be a good person. Do the best you can, encourage your child to do the best he/she can, and make the best decisions you can with the information and resources that you have. Good luck and stop criticizing people's decisions or justifying your own.
Jesus, thanks, Dad.

Hate to break it to you, but sometimes it actually does come down to one decision. There are volumes written on how key decisions made at certain passages in life lead to opportunities that may not have been there is a different decision is made - both positive or negative.

Not a universal truth, but true often enough.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
This is a really interesting thread. What people lose sight of is, is that I don't believe anyone thinks there is a magic pill to guarantee your child go Ivy, D1, or to a top paying job. One decision you make, like what HS you choose, or what 1/2 season team you play on, will not determine a child's success. "Success" is a combination of so many factors, some you can control, and some you can not. Be a good parent and role model, teach good morals, good work ethic, and how to be a good person. Do the best you can, encourage your child to do the best he/she can, and make the best decisions you can with the information and resources that you have. Good luck and stop criticizing people's decisions or justifying your own.
Jesus, thanks, Dad.

Hate to break it to you, but sometimes it actually does come down to one decision. There are volumes written on how key decisions made at certain passages in life lead to opportunities that may not have been there is a different decision is made - both positive or negative.

Not a universal truth, but true often enough.
Not the prior poster but...fine if you want to look at it that way, but most times you won't know which decision was the "critical" decision until after the fact, so what is the use of making any and all of these decisions into cringe-worthy dboard fodder? The real answer is: just about any university will offer your child the resources they need to make a good enough living to allow their children (your grandchildren) the opportunity to play youth hockey, as long as they put in the work. The school might not be sexy, and you might not get to stick your chest out and brag to your officemates about where your kid goes to school, but he can get the foundation to build a successful career. Shoot for the stars, of course, but don't think that it's all over if you have to settle for the moon. Success is ultimately judged on the strength of your professional career, not the origin of your high school or college diploma.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
The prep defenders (after all they're the ones needing to justify laying out the cash) will be quick to circle the 'it's all about the education! it's all about the education!' wagons but the problem with prep is the wide age differential. The incoming kid will be fighting for ice time and have his head rammed through the boards by a 19 year old PG man...and conversely the 19 year old man is playing against 15 year old children. And that's great for the 15 year old phenom or early puberty kid who is 6'2" 180 at 15 years old but as a true freshman it can have it's issues. FS teams get more of a level playing field.

And for 'it's all about the education! it's all about the education!' crowd then when the ultimate goal is reached and the kid gets a partial ride to a Hockey East school and he comes home and says 'mom & dad the good news is I get to play competitive hockey...but the bad news is, because the hockey demands are so great I think I will become a Communications major or a phy. ed major." Or the kid makes the almost ultimate goal and comes home and says, 'mom & dad the good news is I get to play competitive D-1 hockey...but the bad news is, the only places offering me a spot are places called Canisius College or Bemidji State." And then all of a sudden it's not 'all about the education.'
"And for 'it's all about the education! it's all about the education!' crowd then when the ultimate goal is reached and the kid gets a partial ride to a Hockey East school and he comes home and says 'mom & dad the good news is I get to play competitive hockey...but the bad news is, because the hockey demands are so great I think I will become a Communications major or a phy. ed major." Or the kid makes the almost ultimate goal and comes home and says, 'mom & dad the good news is I get to play competitive D-1 hockey...but the bad news is, the only places offering me a spot are places called Canisius College or Bemidji State." And then all of a sudden it's not 'all about the education.'

So what does the full season player come home and say? Hey guys I didn't get into any schools so I'm gonna take a few night classes at the local community college, play some DIII Junior hockey and sleep in the basement? Solid plan!

Re: Prep School Decisions

I love the fact these two guys are pretending they have jobs. Classic d-board here. Lets pull out W-2's!!

I am thinking IP addresses would be more like 1.) A public (free internet) library in Lowell 2.) Flip phone outside the Porthole in Lynn

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
I love the fact these two guys are pretending they have jobs. Classic d-board here. Lets pull out W-2's!!

I am thinking IP addresses would be more like 1.) A public (free internet) library in Lowell 2.) Flip phone outside the Porthole in Lynn
And with deductive powers like that, I'll bet your resume says "Rocket Scientist."

Too bad it isn't made out of tin foil, you could use it for a hat.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
I love the fact these two guys are pretending they have jobs. Classic d-board here. Lets pull out W-2\'s!!

I am thinking IP addresses would be more like 1.) A public (free internet) library in Lowell 2.) Flip phone outside the Porthole in Lynn
:joy: :joy: :joy:

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
The prep defenders (after all they\\\\\\\'re the ones needing to justify laying out the cash) will be quick to circle the \\\\\\\'it\\\\\\\'s all about the education! it\\\\\\\'s all about the education!\\\\\\\' wagons but the problem with prep is the wide age differential. The incoming kid will be fighting for ice time and have his head rammed through the boards by a 19 year old PG man...and conversely the 19 year old man is playing against 15 year old children. And that\\\\\\\'s great for the 15 year old phenom or early puberty kid who is 6\\\\\\\'2\\\\\\\" 180 at 15 years old but as a true freshman it can have it\\\\\\\'s issues. FS teams get more of a level playing field.

And for \\\\\\\'it\\\\\\\'s all about the education! it\\\\\\\'s all about the education!\\\\\\\' crowd then when the ultimate goal is reached and the kid gets a partial ride to a Hockey East school and he comes home and says \\\\\\\'mom & dad the good news is I get to play competitive hockey...but the bad news is, because the hockey demands are so great I think I will become a Communications major or a phy. ed major.\\\\\\\" Or the kid makes the almost ultimate goal and comes home and says, \\\\\\\'mom & dad the good news is I get to play competitive D-1 hockey...but the bad news is, the only places offering me a spot are places called Canisius College or Bemidji State.\\\\\\\" And then all of a sudden it\\\\\\\'s not \\\\\\\'all about the education.\\\\\\\'
Sorry your kid got cut! I mean, "wait-listed"

Re: Prep School Decisions

Ready. Set. Attack:

Prep Hockey Advisors
@prephockeyadv
Recently contacted by a school w top hockey & academics, looking for high end forward. If you’re still looking for placement this Fall, let PHA know. We simplify the process. #prephockey #prepschool #nepsac

Re: Prep School Decisions

Only on the Dboard can a question about 03 prep players turn into 2 millionaires arguing over the process of creating a resume..and still not get the answer about the 03 prep players.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Glad someone finally pointed this out. So let's assume 03 wants prep around Boston area, not an argument about FS hockey or economics/resumes. What are the schools that are top choices?

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Glad someone finally pointed this out. So let's assume 03 wants prep around Boston area, not an argument about FS hockey or economics/resumes. What are the schools that are top choices?
ISL is the way to go, no worries about PG's..but very competitive to gain a spot at Milton, Thayer, Lawrence,Rivers, Sebs, Belmont Hill. There is also a huge difference between gaining a spot and stepping on the ice in a game.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
Anon
Glad someone finally pointed this out. So let\'s assume 03 wants prep around Boston area, not an argument about FS hockey or economics/resumes. What are the schools that are top choices?
ISL is the way to go, no worries about PG's..but very competitive to gain a spot at Milton, Thayer, Lawrence,Rivers, Sebs, Belmont Hill. There is also a huge difference between gaining a spot and stepping on the ice in a game.
Depends on what you are looking for but hard to argue with ISL schools for a great education. Hockey focused add Kimball Union, Salisbury, Cushing

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
anon
Anon
Glad someone finally pointed this out. So let\\\'s assume 03 wants prep around Boston area, not an argument about FS hockey or economics/resumes. What are the schools that are top choices?
ISL is the way to go, no worries about PG\'s..but very competitive to gain a spot at Milton, Thayer, Lawrence,Rivers, Sebs, Belmont Hill. There is also a huge difference between gaining a spot and stepping on the ice in a game.
Depends on what you are looking for but hard to argue with ISL schools for a great education. Hockey focused add Kimball Union, Salisbury, Cushing
Agree, but he was looking for Boston area.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
anon
Anon
Glad someone finally pointed this out. So let\\\'s assume 03 wants prep around Boston area, not an argument about FS hockey or economics/resumes. What are the schools that are top choices?
ISL is the way to go, no worries about PG\'s..but very competitive to gain a spot at Milton, Thayer, Lawrence,Rivers, Sebs, Belmont Hill. There is also a huge difference between gaining a spot and stepping on the ice in a game.
Depends on what you are looking for but hard to argue with ISL schools for a great education. Hockey focused add Kimball Union, Salisbury, Cushing
What about Nobles and Dexter?

Re: Prep School Decisions

You all sound like a bunch of 5 year olds.

It's pretty simple, if the kid is driven and wants to succeed they will do it from anywhere, Prep or Public.

What HS you attended when you were 16 means very little when you're applying for a job at 35. Are you qualified, are you a good person, do you work hard, etc....all of this starts at home.

Raise the kids well and push them to succeed. For some, that may mean kicking them out the door at 14 and shipping them off to prep school....for others (like me) I'm going raise my own kid and do the job myself.

Re: Prep School Decisions

curious...
You all sound like a bunch of 5 year olds.

It's pretty simple, if the kid is driven and wants to succeed they will do it from anywhere, Prep or Public.

What HS you attended when you were 16 means very little when you're applying for a job at 35. Are you qualified, are you a good person, do you work hard, etc....all of this starts at home.

Raise the kids well and push them to succeed. For some, that may mean kicking them out the door at 14 and shipping them off to prep school....for others (like me) I'm going raise my own kid and do the job myself.

With all due respect, I hope your realize that a number of articles have been done on this topic and if you can get into a top academic prep, it will absolutely make a difference with where you are at 35. The difference being at 35, one person is applying for a mid level management job while the other a VP position. Forgetting about hockey completely, if your son can get into Groton, Nobles, Phillips, Choate, etc., on average, they will far exceed the lifetime earnings of their peers.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
curious...
You all sound like a bunch of 5 year olds.

It\'s pretty simple, if the kid is driven and wants to succeed they will do it from anywhere, Prep or Public.

What HS you attended when you were 16 means very little when you\'re applying for a job at 35. Are you qualified, are you a good person, do you work hard, etc....all of this starts at home.

Raise the kids well and push them to succeed. For some, that may mean kicking them out the door at 14 and shipping them off to prep school....for others (like me) I\'m going raise my own kid and do the job myself.

With all due respect, I hope your realize that a number of articles have been done on this topic and if you can get into a top academic prep, it will absolutely make a difference with where you are at 35. The difference being at 35, one person is applying for a mid level management job while the other a VP position. Forgetting about hockey completely, if your son can get into Groton, Nobles, Phillips, Choate, etc., on average, they will far exceed the lifetime earnings of their peers.
They don't realize. Which is what led to the debate. If you prepped it absolutely comes up at 35. You WANT it to come up.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
curious...
You all sound like a bunch of 5 year olds.

It\\\'s pretty simple, if the kid is driven and wants to succeed they will do it from anywhere, Prep or Public.

What HS you attended when you were 16 means very little when you\\\'re applying for a job at 35. Are you qualified, are you a good person, do you work hard, etc....all of this starts at home.

Raise the kids well and push them to succeed. For some, that may mean kicking them out the door at 14 and shipping them off to prep school....for others (like me) I\\\'m going raise my own kid and do the job myself.

With all due respect, I hope your realize that a number of articles have been done on this topic and if you can get into a top academic prep, it will absolutely make a difference with where you are at 35. The difference being at 35, one person is applying for a mid level management job while the other a VP position. Forgetting about hockey completely, if your son can get into Groton, Nobles, Phillips, Choate, etc., on average, they will far exceed the lifetime earnings of their peers.
Cite one article that shows the difference to be the prep schools and not family money and family connections or some other aspect that the prep school didn't create. The top prep schools send so many graduates to ivy colleges because they accept the kids who are already on an ivy track. Prep can be a great experience but they are not turning average Joes into CEOs.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Bingo, especially in today’s generation. Schools mean very little for kids not coming from money. Drive, focus and humility will be EVERYTHING!

I have a few 35 year old preppers that went to great hipster liberal arts colleges (HC, Bates, Bowdoin) - all mid level sales guys....none of them bright....all of them good athletes

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Bingo, especially in today’s generation. Schools mean very little for kids not coming from money. Drive, focus and humility will be EVERYTHING!

I have a few 35 year old preppers that went to great hipster liberal arts colleges (HC, Bates, Bowdoin) - all mid level sales guys....none of them bright....all of them good athletes
...that went Prep because of their athleticism.

That is still the minority of Prep school students.

Which, non-Prep parents don't get.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Anon
Bingo, especially in today’s generation. Schools mean very little for kids not coming from money. Drive, focus and humility will be EVERYTHING!

I have a few 35 year old preppers that went to great hipster liberal arts colleges (HC, Bates, Bowdoin) - all mid level sales guys....none of them bright....all of them good athletes
...that went Prep because of their athleticism.

That is still the minority of Prep school students.

Which, non-Prep parents don't get.
Agreed. Those guys make great sales guys. Most of those sales guys make as much money and work less then upper management. Whose to say the aren't the brightest. :)

It's all about " Knowing Thyself" and utilizing your strengths. Prep school is a great path athletically and academically. If it helps you become a better student and athlete and opens doors to a better college (Better , relative to your academic ceiling) and a high paying sales position ( Ditto) that is a success story. Don't have to be the brightest guy in the room to be successful, wealthy oh yeah happy too.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
anon
curious...
You all sound like a bunch of 5 year olds.

It\\\\\\\'s pretty simple, if the kid is driven and wants to succeed they will do it from anywhere, Prep or Public.

What HS you attended when you were 16 means very little when you\\\\\\\'re applying for a job at 35. Are you qualified, are you a good person, do you work hard, etc....all of this starts at home.

Raise the kids well and push them to succeed. For some, that may mean kicking them out the door at 14 and shipping them off to prep school....for others (like me) I\\\\\\\'m going raise my own kid and do the job myself.

With all due respect, I hope your realize that a number of articles have been done on this topic and if you can get into a top academic prep, it will absolutely make a difference with where you are at 35. The difference being at 35, one person is applying for a mid level management job while the other a VP position. Forgetting about hockey completely, if your son can get into Groton, Nobles, Phillips, Choate, etc., on average, they will far exceed the lifetime earnings of their peers.
Cite one article that shows the difference to be the prep schools and not family money and family connections or some other aspect that the prep school didn't create. The top prep schools send so many graduates to ivy colleges because they accept the kids who are already on an ivy track. Prep can be a great experience but they are not turning average Joes into CEOs.
https://www.forbes.com/2010/04/29/best-prep-schools-2010-opinions-private-education.html#e9fa72050277

Since you probably aren't really going to read the article, let's look at it another way. A business degree from Harvard, on average, is worth more than a degree from UMass to a students life time earnings. Overall acceptance rate at Harvard is 5%-6% of all applicants. The acceptance rate at Harvard for Groton School graduates is over 20%, same is true of Nobles @ Brown, Choate @ Yale, etc.

You are right, sitting to right of your son in history class at Groton is the son of some wealthy CxO who is likely to become your sons friend, giving him a seat at the table for the rest of his life. Maybe not right next to CxO offspring but not far away. The UMass kid can earn a seat at the table but your son got to his seat easier & faster thanks to his connections. There are lots of prep schools and they all aren't created equal but if your son can get accepted to one of the true elites,

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
Anon
anon
curious...
You all sound like a bunch of 5 year olds.

It\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s pretty simple, if the kid is driven and wants to succeed they will do it from anywhere, Prep or Public.

What HS you attended when you were 16 means very little when you\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'re applying for a job at 35. Are you qualified, are you a good person, do you work hard, etc....all of this starts at home.

Raise the kids well and push them to succeed. For some, that may mean kicking them out the door at 14 and shipping them off to prep school....for others (like me) I\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'m going raise my own kid and do the job myself.

With all due respect, I hope your realize that a number of articles have been done on this topic and if you can get into a top academic prep, it will absolutely make a difference with where you are at 35. The difference being at 35, one person is applying for a mid level management job while the other a VP position. Forgetting about hockey completely, if your son can get into Groton, Nobles, Phillips, Choate, etc., on average, they will far exceed the lifetime earnings of their peers.
Cite one article that shows the difference to be the prep schools and not family money and family connections or some other aspect that the prep school didn\'t create. The top prep schools send so many graduates to ivy colleges because they accept the kids who are already on an ivy track. Prep can be a great experience but they are not turning average Joes into CEOs.
https://www.forbes.com/2010/04/29/best-prep-schools-2010-opinions-private-education.html#e9fa72050277

Since you probably aren't really going to read the article, let's look at it another way. A business degree from Harvard, on average, is worth more than a degree from UMass to a students life time earnings. Overall acceptance rate at Harvard is 5%-6% of all applicants. The acceptance rate at Harvard for Groton School graduates is over 20%, same is true of Nobles @ Brown, Choate @ Yale, etc.

You are right, sitting to right of your son in history class at Groton is the son of some wealthy CxO who is likely to become your sons friend, giving him a seat at the table for the rest of his life. Maybe not right next to CxO offspring but not far away. The UMass kid can earn a seat at the table but your son got to his seat easier & faster thanks to his connections. There are lots of prep schools and they all aren't created equal but if your son can get accepted to one of the true elites,
That article doesn't provide evidence to support, or even assert as opinion, that prep schools are taking average kids and turning them into ivy league college students. Roughly 70% of the kids at every prep are full pay kids from rich families and will be FP college applicants. Many have parents who attended elite colleges and have been active members of alumni groups. Many of the parents also attended prep and have been lifelong donors to their prep school and elite colleges. Roughly 30% of admitted prep students have a family member who attended the school. Your main point is that prep provides better contacts than other options. With all due respect, that is hardly insightful. Whether it is worth the price of admission is debatable.

Re: Prep School Decisions

OK we get the Pros/Cons

But what Prep loaded up with 03/04's and repeats?

Re: Prep School Decisions

Lot of kids didn’t get shown the money by preps. Makes parents who’ve been hyping kids since mites sad.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Many middle class families all in the same situation. Tuition of 65k, school given 35-40k..still 25-30k per year.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Many middle class families all in the same situation. Tuition of 65k, school given 35-40k..still 25-30k per year.
I'm an executive, my wife is a nurse, we were told we make to much money (150K) for aid but the schools agreed we couldn't afford full tuition. Thanks for nothing Private School.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
Anon
Many middle class families all in the same situation. Tuition of 65k, school given 35-40k..still 25-30k per year.
I'm an executive, my wife is a nurse, we were told we make to much money (150K) for aid but the schools agreed we couldn't afford full tuition. Thanks for nothing Private School.
If you'r wife is a nurse and your family income is $150K you're not an "executive." Unless you left off a zero.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
anon
Anon
Many middle class families all in the same situation. Tuition of 65k, school given 35-40k..still 25-30k per year.
I\'m an executive, my wife is a nurse, we were told we make to much money (150K) for aid but the schools agreed we couldn\'t afford full tuition. Thanks for nothing Private School.
If you'r wife is a nurse and your family income is $150K you're not an "executive." Unless you left off a zero.
Thanks..I'll let HR know my title is incorrect.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
anon
anon
Anon
Many middle class families all in the same situation. Tuition of 65k, school given 35-40k..still 25-30k per year.
I\\\'m an executive, my wife is a nurse, we were told we make to much money (150K) for aid but the schools agreed we couldn\\\'t afford full tuition. Thanks for nothing Private School.
If you\'r wife is a nurse and your family income is \$150K you\'re not an \"executive.\" Unless you left off a zero.
Thanks..I'll let HR know my title is incorrect.
I feel like Jeff Foxworthy. If you base what you do on the title assigned to your role by HR, you're not an executive.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Too bad your "TITLE" got cut...:laughing: :laughing: :man:

Re: Prep School Decisions

Do schools ever give full tuition for athletes?

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
Do schools ever give full tuition for athletes?

Not only based on Athletics, but if you have Athletics, Academics, and Financial need, then some schools have been given grants to fund kids fully. I believe Cushing did it this year with grant money they received and few others. Schools Tuition has increased over the past 10 years and the Financial grants have stayed steady and with more and more athletes particularly in ice hockey applying to these schools many families end up disappointed with 30K fee where others have no problem with that or even full pay. Not getting into a Prep is by no means the end of your kids athletic journey, find a good FS team where he can develop athletically both on and off the ice. You have to remember a vast majority of these kids will be trying out for the same JR spots in a few years and the evaluators don't care where you came from, they only care if you produce on the ice and your character off the ice. Good luck and look forward to seeing all these kids in the next few years!

Re: Prep School Decisions

The route to college hockey is ridiculous. Make the sport more accessible to inner city kids and quickly watch the full-pay prep boys lose their built-in advantage.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
The route to college hockey is ridiculous. Make the sport more accessible to inner city kids and quickly watch the full-pay prep boys lose their built-in advantage.
Money is certainly part of the equation but there doesn't seem to be much cultural interest for the sport in the inner-city.

Re: Prep School Decisions

A better game would be Lacrosse and their 50 man college rosters. You tell me if you took every D-3 running back, CB, TE, QB, LB, safety . . . college football recruit from the inner city and handed then a stick their junior year of high school if that sport wouldn't change in less than 5 years. Country club boys play it while you can, athletes might just be coming!

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
A better game would be Lacrosse and their 50 man college rosters. You tell me if you took every D-3 running back, CB, TE, QB, LB, safety . . . college football recruit from the inner city and handed then a stick their junior year of high school if that sport wouldn't change in less than 5 years. Country club boys play it while you can, athletes might just be coming!
I have no doubt this could happen but again I wonder how much interest there is for the sport?

Soccer and track get more interest than lax and baseball in most inner-city schools.

Re: Prep School Decisions

Anon
anon
A better game would be Lacrosse and their 50 man college rosters. You tell me if you took every D-3 running back, CB, TE, QB, LB, safety . . . college football recruit from the inner city and handed then a stick their junior year of high school if that sport wouldn\'t change in less than 5 years. Country club boys play it while you can, athletes might just be coming!
I have no doubt this could happen but again I wonder how much interest there is for the sport?

Soccer and track get more interest than lax and baseball in most inner-city schools.
This conversation is picking up some racial undertones, so let's ease up a bit. Not all African American athletes are in the inner city, not all white athletes are from country clubs.

LAX and track are never going to supplant the Big 3 sports among inner city athletes. There's too little pro money to be attractive. The goal of the inner city athlete isn't college. College is a hindrance more than anything.

Re: Prep School Decisions

anon
Anon
anon
A better game would be Lacrosse and their 50 man college rosters. You tell me if you took every D-3 running back, CB, TE, QB, LB, safety . . . college football recruit from the inner city and handed then a stick their junior year of high school if that sport wouldn\\\'t change in less than 5 years. Country club boys play it while you can, athletes might just be coming!
I have no doubt this could happen but again I wonder how much interest there is for the sport?

Soccer and track get more interest than lax and baseball in most inner-city schools.
This conversation is picking up some racial undertones, so let's ease up a bit. Not all African American athletes are in the inner city, not all white athletes are from country clubs.

LAX and track are never going to supplant the Big 3 sports among inner city athletes. There's too little pro money to be attractive. The goal of the inner city athlete isn't college. College is a hindrance more than anything.
Sorry. Not trying to go there and your point is correct.

There are more than a few non-white athletes in the 'burbs but to be honest I don't see very many playing lax or hockey. That's certainly not to say they couldn't but maybe there isn't a comfort level for them to want to play?

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

anon
Anon
anon
A better game would be Lacrosse and their 50 man college rosters. You tell me if you took every D-3 running back, CB, TE, QB, LB, safety . . . college football recruit from the inner city and handed then a stick their junior year of high school if that sport wouldn\\\'t change in less than 5 years. Country club boys play it while you can, athletes might just be coming!
I have no doubt this could happen but again I wonder how much interest there is for the sport?

Soccer and track get more interest than lax and baseball in most inner-city schools.
This conversation is picking up some racial undertones, so let's ease up a bit. Not all African American athletes are in the inner city, not all white athletes are from country clubs.

LAX and track are never going to supplant the Big 3 sports among inner city athletes. There's too little pro money to be attractive. The goal of the inner city athlete isn't college. College is a hindrance more than anything.
Dude are you for real?? You say there is a racial undertone and then suggest that academics are a hindrance to the inner city athlete. Ok

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

Anon
anon
Anon
anon
A better game would be Lacrosse and their 50 man college rosters. You tell me if you took every D-3 running back, CB, TE, QB, LB, safety . . . college football recruit from the inner city and handed then a stick their junior year of high school if that sport wouldn\\\\\\\'t change in less than 5 years. Country club boys play it while you can, athletes might just be coming!
I have no doubt this could happen but again I wonder how much interest there is for the sport?

Soccer and track get more interest than lax and baseball in most inner-city schools.
This conversation is picking up some racial undertones, so let\'s ease up a bit. Not all African American athletes are in the inner city, not all white athletes are from country clubs.

LAX and track are never going to supplant the Big 3 sports among inner city athletes. There\'s too little pro money to be attractive. The goal of the inner city athlete isn\'t college. College is a hindrance more than anything.
Dude are you for real?? You say there is a racial undertone and then suggest that academics are a hindrance to the inner city athlete. Ok
The impact of inner city socioeconomics aren't bounded by race. You could accuse me of being a snob by saying that kids from inner city schools are less likely to go to college, if it weren't consistent with pretty much every study ever done.

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

anon
Anon
anon
Anon
anon
A better game would be Lacrosse and their 50 man college rosters. You tell me if you took every D-3 running back, CB, TE, QB, LB, safety . . . college football recruit from the inner city and handed then a stick their junior year of high school if that sport wouldn\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'t change in less than 5 years. Country club boys play it while you can, athletes might just be coming!
I have no doubt this could happen but again I wonder how much interest there is for the sport?

Soccer and track get more interest than lax and baseball in most inner-city schools.
This conversation is picking up some racial undertones, so let\\'s ease up a bit. Not all African American athletes are in the inner city, not all white athletes are from country clubs.

LAX and track are never going to supplant the Big 3 sports among inner city athletes. There\\'s too little pro money to be attractive. The goal of the inner city athlete isn\\'t college. College is a hindrance more than anything.
Dude are you for real?? You say there is a racial undertone and then suggest that academics are a hindrance to the inner city athlete. Ok
The impact of inner city socioeconomics aren't bounded by race. You could accuse me of being a snob by saying that kids from inner city schools are less likely to go to college, if it weren't consistent with pretty much every study ever done.
You are grouping every African American kid in one category, ala " AAU" type athletes. That professor is down rght racist and pretty comical considering you scolded another for speaking accurately. So Mr Fancy pants take your fancy talk and your fake studies and head down to the cape

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

Truth is if you are a middle class white family and your kid is a B+ student and plays 2-3 sports you have no shot at affording prep school. You end up making to much for good financial, but if you are poor as dirt and have some behavioral problems, then you have a good chance at getting in and getting the grant you need. System is broken, but diversity is what they are looking for...GO BOY SCOUTS!

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

anon
Truth is if you are a middle class white family and your kid is a B+ student and plays 2-3 sports you have no shot at affording prep school. You end up making to much for good financial, but if you are poor as dirt and have some behavioral problems, then you have a good chance at getting in and getting the grant you need. System is broken, but diversity is what they are looking for...GO BOY SCOUTS!
Dirt poor and a stud athlete, good student and character with great potential then yes, they will many times give you a lit of aid. Behavoral problems? Not so much!! Unless it is a specialized school which typically are not the ones with strong athletic programs.

Something tells me you were not pleased with your awards package?

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

Anon
anon
Truth is if you are a middle class white family and your kid is a B+ student and plays 2-3 sports you have no shot at affording prep school. You end up making to much for good financial, but if you are poor as dirt and have some behavioral problems, then you have a good chance at getting in and getting the grant you need. System is broken, but diversity is what they are looking for...GO BOY SCOUTS!
Dirt poor and a stud athlete, good student and character with great potential then yes, they will many times give you a lit of aid. Behavoral problems? Not so much!! Unless it is a specialized school which typically are not the ones with strong athletic programs.

Something tells me you were not pleased with your awards package?
Luckily we did receive what we needed right on the number but so many good kids/ families did not. 25-30k is impossible for any middle class family.

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

Going back a few weeks in this thread, but I love how people think that simply sitting in class with future power brokers at a prep school is somehow going to help your son's career. The same way playing on a team with a D1 commit is going to make your player more attractive to an NHL team. You either have the skills and the drive to succeed or you don't, in sports and in business.

Re: Prep School Decisionsa.

Very true!