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Junior & College Hockey
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Re: USPHL

Here's an idea

Don't go.

Our USPHL experience has been nothing but positive. No scheduling issues. Three refs for every game. Full 20 minute periods (except for Showcases) with ice cleaned after warm-ups and between each period.

And if you keep up with the #### that goes on in Tier III American Juniors around the country you would understand this is how it works, and that the product is far superior to most.

Re: USPHL

It's all for the parents and the kid$ to keep their D-III dreams alive! Funding all of these junior programs is approaching a criminal level.

How about this, Division III imposes a strict age limit for incoming freshmen at 18.5 or 19 years old. Because of the well developed, fully funded, kids don't pay Tier I junior programs (USHL, NAHL and Canadian leagues) that feed D-I programs these schools would be exempt from the age limit. If the kid is a late blooming D-III player he can start in D-III and transfer to a D-I program. Same for any kid who chooses to go directly to college rather than fund these programs he can start as a 'true freshmen' and deiced later to move to D-I. Hopefully this would improve D-III hockey by drawing in better players.

Result: The vast majority of these Tier III junior programs would evaporate, fewer kids would be wasting their time and money playing meaningless hockey, the quality of D-III hockey would improve and more kids would graduate at 21 or 22 years old.

Time to make it happen.

Re: USPHL

I rest my case - someone posted this on the 'elitist' thread



Here's a look at the numbers provided by Neutral Zone.net, as of 2016..

70% of Division 1 college freshmen were 20-22 years old (about half are 21/22 and half are 20/21)
92% of Division 3 college freshemen are 20-22 years old (72% are 21/22 and 20% are 20/21)

Where do they come from?

D1 - 97% come from Jr hockey. 37% from USHL. 16% from BCHL (Canadian Jr A), and 6% from our local USPHL.
Only 1.4% come from Prep School.

D3 - 91% come from Jr hockey. 31% from our local EHL Premier. 13% from local USPHL. 12% from NAHL. 11% from NA3. 10% from EHL 2nd division.
About 7% came from Prep School.

Re: USPHL

Why does it have to change? We're in the middle of what you described, my son is loving hockey and looking forward to playing college hockey whether that's Division I II or III. I can afford to make that happen for him and am enjoying being able to help him to achieve his dream. If I work one extra year before retiring I make every single penny I ever spent on hockey back all the way back to mini mites. In return I have a great many experiences with my son that would have been possible but not as easy as with hockey.

Lots of kids graduate college at 24 or 25 going back as far as when we were in college. I'd much rather it be because he was chasing a dream then just d****** around like so many kids we knew.

Re: USPHL

anon
Why does it have to change? We're in the middle of what you described, my son is loving hockey and looking forward to playing college hockey whether that's Division I II or III. I can afford to make that happen for him and am enjoying being able to help him to achieve his dream. If I work one extra year before retiring I make every single penny I ever spent on hockey back all the way back to mini mites. In return I have a great many experiences with my son that would have been possible but not as easy as with hockey.

Lots of kids graduate college at 24 or 25 going back as far as when we were in college. I'd much rather it be because he was chasing a dream then just d****** around like so many kids we knew.
Exactly. Still chasing the 'D-I Dream' I see. A lot of bank accounts are in the same boat as you and why do it if the system changed and you didn't need to? Like saying "I have this pile of money and I choose to throw it all down the sewer and what right do you have telling me to stop littering?' 'But, but, but it's my money.'

If they imposed an age limit for D-III college hockey my guess is your kid would still be 'loving hockey;' playing college hockey, getting educated, saving time and saving you money....the problem with this is? Oh, the junior team owners would basically be out of business. If the kid really has D-I dreams he would be playing in a Tier I or II level junior league and not paying a dime.

Re: USPHL

anon
anon
Why does it have to change? We're in the middle of what you described, my son is loving hockey and looking forward to playing college hockey whether that's Division I II or III. I can afford to make that happen for him and am enjoying being able to help him to achieve his dream. If I work one extra year before retiring I make every single penny I ever spent on hockey back all the way back to mini mites. In return I have a great many experiences with my son that would have been possible but not as easy as with hockey.

Lots of kids graduate college at 24 or 25 going back as far as when we were in college. I'd much rather it be because he was chasing a dream then just d****** around like so many kids we knew.
Exactly. Still chasing the 'D-I Dream' I see. A lot of bank accounts are in the same boat as you and why do it if the system changed and you didn't need to? Like saying "I have this pile of money and I choose to throw it all down the sewer and what right do you have telling me to stop littering?' 'But, but, but it's my money.'

If they imposed an age limit for D-III college hockey my guess is your kid would still be 'loving hockey;' playing college hockey, getting educated, saving time and saving you money....the problem with this is? Oh, the junior team owners would basically be out of business. If the kid really has D-I dreams he would be playing in a Tier I or II level junior league and not paying a dime.
I'm sorry that you can't understand the economics. It is not "all of my money" - not even close - and I don't see it as a sewer.

I also donate more than my kid's Junior tuition to charity. Is that throwing money down a sewer, too?

As much as I recognize American Juniors basically serves as the NCAA D-League, I'm totally fine with the arrangement. I graduated college just 60 days after turning 21. I've worked professionally since I was 19, giving up the things 19 year olds should be spending their time doing. I'll retire at 60, maybe 61, because a) I can and b) I feel I've worked long and hard enough. I've long maintained I would have loved to have had more time to experience life in my 20's, even if it meant working longer.

I still feel that way.

Then again, I also feel all kids should have to serve in the military at 18 to give them the structure and discipline so sorely lacking in many kids today.

Re: USPHL

anon
anon
anon
Why does it have to change? We're in the middle of what you described, my son is loving hockey and looking forward to playing college hockey whether that's Division I II or III. I can afford to make that happen for him and am enjoying being able to help him to achieve his dream. If I work one extra year before retiring I make every single penny I ever spent on hockey back all the way back to mini mites. In return I have a great many experiences with my son that would have been possible but not as easy as with hockey.

Lots of kids graduate college at 24 or 25 going back as far as when we were in college. I'd much rather it be because he was chasing a dream then just d****** around like so many kids we knew.
Exactly. Still chasing the 'D-I Dream' I see. A lot of bank accounts are in the same boat as you and why do it if the system changed and you didn't need to? Like saying "I have this pile of money and I choose to throw it all down the sewer and what right do you have telling me to stop littering?' 'But, but, but it's my money.'

If they imposed an age limit for D-III college hockey my guess is your kid would still be 'loving hockey;' playing college hockey, getting educated, saving time and saving you money....the problem with this is? Oh, the junior team owners would basically be out of business. If the kid really has D-I dreams he would be playing in a Tier I or II level junior league and not paying a dime.
I'm sorry that you can't understand the economics. It is not "all of my money" - not even close - and I don't see it as a sewer.

I also donate more than my kid's Junior tuition to charity. Is that throwing money down a sewer, too?

As much as I recognize American Juniors basically serves as the NCAA D-League, I'm totally fine with the arrangement. I graduated college just 60 days after turning 21. I've worked professionally since I was 19, giving up the things 19 year olds should be spending their time doing. I'll retire at 60, maybe 61, because a) I can and b) I feel I've worked long and hard enough. I've long maintained I would have loved to have had more time to experience life in my 20's, even if it meant working longer.

I still feel that way.

Then again, I also feel all kids should have to serve in the military at 18 to give them the structure and discipline so sorely lacking in many kids today.
Careful, your head may explode soon..I, I, I, I, I, I..a little full of yourself.

Re: USPHL

anon
anon
anon
anon
Why does it have to change? We\'re in the middle of what you described, my son is loving hockey and looking forward to playing college hockey whether that\'s Division I II or III. I can afford to make that happen for him and am enjoying being able to help him to achieve his dream. If I work one extra year before retiring I make every single penny I ever spent on hockey back all the way back to mini mites. In return I have a great many experiences with my son that would have been possible but not as easy as with hockey.

Lots of kids graduate college at 24 or 25 going back as far as when we were in college. I\'d much rather it be because he was chasing a dream then just d****** around like so many kids we knew.
Exactly. Still chasing the \'D-I Dream\' I see. A lot of bank accounts are in the same boat as you and why do it if the system changed and you didn\'t need to? Like saying \"I have this pile of money and I choose to throw it all down the sewer and what right do you have telling me to stop littering?\' \'But, but, but it\'s my money.\'

If they imposed an age limit for D-III college hockey my guess is your kid would still be \'loving hockey;\' playing college hockey, getting educated, saving time and saving you money....the problem with this is? Oh, the junior team owners would basically be out of business. If the kid really has D-I dreams he would be playing in a Tier I or II level junior league and not paying a dime.
I\'m sorry that you can\'t understand the economics. It is not \"all of my money\" - not even close - and I don\'t see it as a sewer.

I also donate more than my kid\'s Junior tuition to charity. Is that throwing money down a sewer, too?

As much as I recognize American Juniors basically serves as the NCAA D-League, I\'m totally fine with the arrangement. I graduated college just 60 days after turning 21. I\'ve worked professionally since I was 19, giving up the things 19 year olds should be spending their time doing. I\'ll retire at 60, maybe 61, because a) I can and b) I feel I\'ve worked long and hard enough. I\'ve long maintained I would have loved to have had more time to experience life in my 20\'s, even if it meant working longer.

I still feel that way.

Then again, I also feel all kids should have to serve in the military at 18 to give them the structure and discipline so sorely lacking in many kids today.
Careful, your head may explode soon..I, I, I, I, I, I..a little full of yourself.
Really? Huh. I - err, most people - were taught to speak in the first person when offering personal opinion.

Which is what the post was. Personal opinion.

Re: USPHL

Maybe someone should ask the Islanders organization how three of their NCDC players who were committed to DI programs before arriving their, are no longer committed to those schools or any other DI program. it must be that quality development competition they are paying for?

Re: USPHL

I too have worked a long time and have enough money. But you can't argue the system is unlike any other sport and maybe it needs fixing. A kid my son played high school hockey with is a good athlete and pretty much had his choice of go play lacross now at a D-1 school or go and follow the hockey dream and play juniors and hope you stay healthy and get a D-1 deal. Well the lacrosse school stepped up first and offered his a scholarship and away he goes off to college. No other sport thinks its 'normal' or expected to show up at 21 years old as a freshmen. And to do this for a D-3 spot is totally silly.

Re: USPHL

anon
I too have worked a long time and have enough money. But you can't argue the system is unlike any other sport and maybe it needs fixing. A kid my son played high school hockey with is a good athlete and pretty much had his choice of go play lacross now at a D-1 school or go and follow the hockey dream and play juniors and hope you stay healthy and get a D-1 deal. Well the lacrosse school stepped up first and offered his a scholarship and away he goes off to college. No other sport thinks its 'normal' or expected to show up at 21 years old as a freshmen. And to do this for a D-3 spot is totally silly.
Agreed, but lacrosse players are a dime a dozen, and very few on the team receive scholarships, most are walk-ons, and many of partial scholarships

Re: USPHL

Anon
anon
I too have worked a long time and have enough money. But you can\'t argue the system is unlike any other sport and maybe it needs fixing. A kid my son played high school hockey with is a good athlete and pretty much had his choice of go play lacross now at a D-1 school or go and follow the hockey dream and play juniors and hope you stay healthy and get a D-1 deal. Well the lacrosse school stepped up first and offered his a scholarship and away he goes off to college. No other sport thinks its \'normal\' or expected to show up at 21 years old as a freshmen. And to do this for a D-3 spot is totally silly.
Agreed, but lacrosse players are a dime a dozen, and very few on the team receive scholarships, most are walk-ons, and many of partial scholarships
D-III hockey players don't get scholarships either. And what is truly silly is to still see parents connecting the pursuit of an athletic dream with scholarship money. One is emotional, the other rational.

Save for your kid's own college, don't plan on piggybacking his dream. If he gets some $$$, great! Don't put that pressure on your kid. And don't think he doesn't feel it when you keep talking about it. He doesn't know your financial picture.

Re: USPHL

anon
I too have worked a long time and have enough money. But you can't argue the system is unlike any other sport and maybe it needs fixing. A kid my son played high school hockey with is a good athlete and pretty much had his choice of go play lacross now at a D-1 school or go and follow the hockey dream and play juniors and hope you stay healthy and get a D-1 deal. Well the lacrosse school stepped up first and offered his a scholarship and away he goes off to college. No other sport thinks its 'normal' or expected to show up at 21 years old as a freshmen. And to do this for a D-3 spot is totally silly.
I don't know about other sports. An awful lot of football players seem to have a few years under their belt when they graduate, though.

Basketball is even more broken, with its "one and done" rule. It's ruined the sport in that there is no continuity at the NCAA level and no true development system at the pro level.

College baseball? Do you ever watch? Ever? Maybe that sport SHOULD follow hockey.

Obviously we aren't going to agree. I have no issue with Junior Hockey. It gives kids an opportunity that didn't always exist. If it isn't for your kid, send him to school. Nobody's got a gun to anyone's head.

Re: USPHL

Anon
Maybe someone should ask the Islanders organization how three of their NCDC players who were committed to DI programs before arriving their, are no longer committed to those schools or any other DI program. it must be that quality development competition they are paying for?
Which players?

Re: USPHL

Call it the EJHL, USPHL, NCDC, whatever. It was all third-rate third-tier fake junior hockey.

As for the evil that is 21-year-old freshmen in NCAA hockey, they have to go. I was a big proponent of the Big Ten age proposal that was brought up two years ago and it's time to revisit that. I don't have the numbers, but I'd bet that the graduation rate for hockey is far behind other sports due to the 21 year old frosh.