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Youth Hockey
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Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
If you have a 16 year old, your on the wrong board. I have seen the same all summer.
Peewee and Bantam Minor kids just going non stop on the ice. Your doing your kids no favors.
Expectation soar high then they start with their winter team and can't keep up with the pace.
I wonder if their parents push true that hard with Math? Doubt it.


Worry about your own kid, O.K. Some kids make great advancements in the summer and some kids - Peewee & Bantams have to put the time in just to make a C.C. or D-I high school team. Your thought that every kid should do what your limited budget allows for your kid to do is your problem, not everyone else's.

Generally speaking, the wear & tear of an extended season or summer program is solved with a few weeks off or a limited schedule...if the kids wants to improve then let them play.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
Anon
If you have a 16 year old, your on the wrong board. I have seen the same all summer.
Peewee and Bantam Minor kids just going non stop on the ice. Your doing your kids no favors.
Expectation soar high then they start with their winter team and can't keep up with the pace.
I wonder if their parents push true that hard with Math? Doubt it.


Worry about your own kid, O.K. Some kids make great advancements in the summer and some kids - Peewee & Bantams have to put the time in just to make a C.C. or D-I high school team. Your thought that every kid should do what your limited budget allows for your kid to do is your problem, not everyone else's.

Generally speaking, the wear & tear of an extended season or summer program is solved with a few weeks off or a limited schedule...if the kids wants to improve then let them play.


Wrong. Have you talked to any C.C or D-I high school coaches? Not parents but the actual coaches? Have you talked to any Prep coaches? Ask them what they are looking for in a student athlete. Notice how its not called athlete student. They want a kid who is good in the classroom, good for the campus and on the ice/ field. You are setting yourself up to fail.

Remember, Coaches constantly talk to each other, when they see a kid at every tournament playing for any team they can find and the kid looks the same (not getting better) that's what they remember.

As for the money, your 100% right, my spring/summer hockey budget is limited by beach vacations and fishing trips

Re: Kids burnt out

I completely understand older kids and top-end players filling their spring and summer with hockey. For many others I do think it can increase the chance of burnout. This was the first year in the past four my son didn't play spring hockey. Recently he started a skills session and seems refreshed and is anxious for the season to start. I think the break really did him some good and he filled his time with baseball and lax (loved both). Every kid is different but for now this is the path we'll follow.

Re: Kids burnt out

All valid points. As a coach I want all players to come into my locker room hungry to play the game. Over the past few years with the addition of all these spring/summer tournaments it is much more difficult for players to stay focused on that hunger.

I tell my players the same thing every year: If you put the time in during the season, Practice Hard, Practice correctly, and Play each game like its your last, then you earned the time off in spring and summer..If you don't do those things during the season then I'll keep the lights on for you and send you postcards. However, I also work hard at having my kids be seen through out the season so they dont need all of the spring/summer for exposure.

Good luck to all, its a great game when the kids are enjoying it.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
anon
Anon
If you have a 16 year old, your on the wrong board. I have seen the same all summer.
Peewee and Bantam Minor kids just going non stop on the ice. Your doing your kids no favors.
Expectation soar high then they start with their winter team and can't keep up with the pace.
I wonder if their parents push true that hard with Math? Doubt it.


Worry about your own kid, O.K. Some kids make great advancements in the summer and some kids - Peewee & Bantams have to put the time in just to make a C.C. or D-I high school team. Your thought that every kid should do what your limited budget allows for your kid to do is your problem, not everyone else's.

Generally speaking, the wear & tear of an extended season or summer program is solved with a few weeks off or a limited schedule...if the kids wants to improve then let them play.


Wrong. Have you talked to any C.C or D-I high school coaches? Not parents but the actual coaches? Have you talked to any Prep coaches? Ask them what they are looking for in a student athlete. Notice how its not called athlete student. They want a kid who is good in the classroom, good for the campus and on the ice/ field. You are setting yourself up to fail.

You're kidding, right? The coaches don't care one bit about how good they are in the classroom. Most of the recruited athletes - in any sport - will have grades and test scores that wouldn't get them into the school if it weren't for their sport.

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
anon
anon
Anon
If you have a 16 year old, your on the wrong board. I have seen the same all summer.
Peewee and Bantam Minor kids just going non stop on the ice. Your doing your kids no favors.
Expectation soar high then they start with their winter team and can't keep up with the pace.
I wonder if their parents push true that hard with Math? Doubt it.


Worry about your own kid, O.K. Some kids make great advancements in the summer and some kids - Peewee & Bantams have to put the time in just to make a C.C. or D-I high school team. Your thought that every kid should do what your limited budget allows for your kid to do is your problem, not everyone else's.

Generally speaking, the wear & tear of an extended season or summer program is solved with a few weeks off or a limited schedule...if the kids wants to improve then let them play.


Wrong. Have you talked to any C.C or D-I high school coaches? Not parents but the actual coaches? Have you talked to any Prep coaches? Ask them what they are looking for in a student athlete. Notice how its not called athlete student. They want a kid who is good in the classroom, good for the campus and on the ice/ field. You are setting yourself up to fail.

You're kidding, right? The coaches don't care one bit about how good they are in the classroom. Most of the recruited athletes - in any sport - will have grades and test scores that wouldn't get them into the school if it weren't for their sport.

Maybe 10 years ago. In today's climate the supply is so great that the Admissions office now has the final say not the coach. Ever wonder why coaches talk to so many kids? They hope that some of them can actually get admission to the school. Wake up, do your research.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
anon
Anon
If you have a 16 year old, your on the wrong board. I have seen the same all summer.
Peewee and Bantam Minor kids just going non stop on the ice. Your doing your kids no favors.
Expectation soar high then they start with their winter team and can't keep up with the pace.
I wonder if their parents push true that hard with Math? Doubt it.


Worry about your own kid, O.K. Some kids make great advancements in the summer and some kids - Peewee & Bantams have to put the time in just to make a C.C. or D-I high school team. Your thought that every kid should do what your limited budget allows for your kid to do is your problem, not everyone else's.

Generally speaking, the wear & tear of an extended season or summer program is solved with a few weeks off or a limited schedule...if the kids wants to improve then let them play.


Wrong. Have you talked to any C.C or D-I high school coaches? Not parents but the actual coaches? Have you talked to any Prep coaches? Ask them what they are looking for in a student athlete. Notice how its not called athlete student. They want a kid who is good in the classroom, good for the campus and on the ice/ field. You are setting yourself up to fail.

Remember, Coaches constantly talk to each other, when they see a kid at every tournament playing for any team they can find and the kid looks the same (not getting better) that's what they remember.

As for the money, your 100% right, my spring/summer hockey budget is limited by beach vacations and fishing trips



"Wrong. Have you talked to any C.C or D-I high school coaches?" Get back to the kiddie board and try to bully people there. Been there, been through D-I and been through prep so pipe down. You a clueless. The guy who said 'worry about your own kid' hit it right. If you are a 'hockey player' you play hockey and not just 3 moths of the year (Dec. Jan. Feb.). If your kid is a tuba player who plays a little hockey (3 months) he is a tuba player. Your half baked opinions mean little around here.

Maybe you should start a 'Beach vacations and fishing trips' discussion board. This is a hockey discussion board for hockey players not skin cancer victims with mercury poisoning.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
anon
anon
Anon
If you have a 16 year old, your on the wrong board. I have seen the same all summer.
Peewee and Bantam Minor kids just going non stop on the ice. Your doing your kids no favors.
Expectation soar high then they start with their winter team and can't keep up with the pace.
I wonder if their parents push true that hard with Math? Doubt it.


Worry about your own kid, O.K. Some kids make great advancements in the summer and some kids - Peewee & Bantams have to put the time in just to make a C.C. or D-I high school team. Your thought that every kid should do what your limited budget allows for your kid to do is your problem, not everyone else's.

Generally speaking, the wear & tear of an extended season or summer program is solved with a few weeks off or a limited schedule...if the kids wants to improve then let them play.


Wrong. Have you talked to any C.C or D-I high school coaches? Not parents but the actual coaches? Have you talked to any Prep coaches? Ask them what they are looking for in a student athlete. Notice how its not called athlete student. They want a kid who is good in the classroom, good for the campus and on the ice/ field. You are setting yourself up to fail.

Remember, Coaches constantly talk to each other, when they see a kid at every tournament playing for any team they can find and the kid looks the same (not getting better) that's what they remember.

As for the money, your 100% right, my spring/summer hockey budget is limited by beach vacations and fishing trips



"Wrong. Have you talked to any C.C or D-I high school coaches?" Get back to the kiddie board and try to bully people there. Been there, been through D-I and been through prep so pipe down. You a clueless. The guy who said 'worry about your own kid' hit it right. If you are a 'hockey player' you play hockey and not just 3 moths of the year (Dec. Jan. Feb.). If your kid is a tuba player who plays a little hockey (3 months) he is a tuba player. Your half baked opinions mean little around here.

Maybe you should start a 'Beach vacations and fishing trips' discussion board. This is a hockey discussion board for hockey players not skin cancer victims with mercury poisoning.

Let me guess, you played back in the late 90's or earlier right when everything was done with a handshake and a beer? Times have changed my friend, unless you are a 1% player, decisions for admission to a school are made by admission officers based on grades, recommendation letters, and interviews.
Keep running Jr into the ground, makes my guys chances better.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon

Let me guess, you played back in the late 90's or earlier right when everything was done with a handshake and a beer? Times have changed my friend, unless you are a 1% player, decisions for admission to a school are made by admission officers based on grades, recommendation letters, and interviews.
Keep running Jr into the ground, makes my guys chances better.
My kid is a recruited player at a Keller school RIGHT NOW. He happens to have the grades/scores/recommendations/interview skills to have gotten into his (and other) school on merit. That makes him different than his teammates. These schools recruit HEAVILY, and academic capability comes last. Yes, they want to make sure the kid can make grades - they want the athlete for at least three years - but their grades/scores are below those of kids from better schools with better grades that aren't athletes, that are being turned down by Admissions.

And even though he was a Top 6 player as a Freshman, he is working his butt off this summer, because if he doesn't improve and get stronger, there's a new recruit that they won't hesitate for one second to replace him with.

So, every spring/summer since he was 10, when HE said he wanted to play Spring hockey, I've gradually increased the intensity of his off season work, bit by bit, year after year. Rather than being "burnt out," he has come into the season each year as a much better player that he was during tryouts, moving right past kids, hungrier than ever to improve.

Success breeds confidence, and confidence breeds success.

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
anon

Let me guess, you played back in the late 90's or earlier right when everything was done with a handshake and a beer? Times have changed my friend, unless you are a 1% player, decisions for admission to a school are made by admission officers based on grades, recommendation letters, and interviews.
Keep running Jr into the ground, makes my guys chances better.
My kid is a recruited player at a Keller school RIGHT NOW. He happens to have the grades/scores/recommendations/interview skills to have gotten into his (and other) school on merit. That makes him different than his teammates. These schools recruit HEAVILY, and academic capability comes last. Yes, they want to make sure the kid can make grades - they want the athlete for at least three years - but their grades/scores are below those of kids from better schools with better grades that aren't athletes, that are being turned down by Admissions.

And even though he was a Top 6 player as a Freshman, he is working his butt off this summer, because if he doesn't improve and get stronger, there's a new recruit that they won't hesitate for one second to replace him with.

So, every spring/summer since he was 10, when HE said he wanted to play Spring hockey, I've gradually increased the intensity of his off season work, bit by bit, year after year. Rather than being "burnt out," he has come into the season each year as a much better player that he was during tryouts, moving right past kids, hungrier than ever to improve.

Success breeds confidence, and confidence breeds success.


Not the prior poster.

Clearly you got it right and your kid is on a different level talent-wise than his peers. But we need to be careful about spreading advice or advocating that the tuba players keep playing through the spring and summer. That doesn't help them and it doesn't help the more serious player looking for a good competitive off-season skate. Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest.

Re: Kids burnt out

" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'


Actually, yes, I am an expert on children, more specifically the mindset of adolescence in children from the ages of 10-16. Here is quick overview for you:
You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it, you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc.
You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him.
Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session.

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
anon
" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'


Actually, yes, I am an expert on children, more specifically the mindset of adolescence in children from the ages of 10-16. Here is quick overview for you:
You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it, you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc.
You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him.
Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session.



- "Here is quick overview for you:"

- "You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it..." I made it 'Mr. Expert.' I was raised in the inner city and I became a professional athlete. I used my education and my earnings to raise my kids the way I want to raise them. Sure, sure genetically they most likely have a leg-up on a lot of kids but I found my way out by outworking everyone else.


- "you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc." Basically I have a side business and I'm pretty much retired @ 50 and have been married to the same woman (and yes she was an athlete too) for more than 25 years....thanks for your worry.

- "You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him." I have little to do with it at this point, he got ahead because he wanted to, he might be genetically better than a lot of kids but he knows what hard work, commitment and focus actually mean.

- "Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session."

Maybe you need to read a few books yourself and the others hit it right on the head - Worry about your own kid.


Re: Kids burnt out

As the kids say, Boom, roasted.

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
As the kids say, Boom, roasted.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
Anon
anon
" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'


Actually, yes, I am an expert on children, more specifically the mindset of adolescence in children from the ages of 10-16. Here is quick overview for you:
You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it, you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc.
You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him.
Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session.



- "Here is quick overview for you:"

- "You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it..." I made it 'Mr. Expert.' I was raised in the inner city and I became a professional athlete. I used my education and my earnings to raise my kids the way I want to raise them. Sure, sure genetically they most likely have a leg-up on a lot of kids but I found my way out by outworking everyone else.


- "you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc." Basically I have a side business and I'm pretty much retired @ 50 and have been married to the same woman (and yes she was an athlete too) for more than 25 years....thanks for your worry.

- "You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him." I have little to do with it at this point, he got ahead because he wanted to, he might be genetically better than a lot of kids but he knows what hard work, commitment and focus actually mean.

- "Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session."

Maybe you need to read a few books yourself and the others hit it right on the head - Worry about your own kid.




The problem with people on this board is that you think the poster is talking directly to you. Guy, nobody knows who you are! We are all making statements to the general public, not singling you out. If it makes you feel better to tell us how well you've navigated life, well I think that's a little weird. Unless you're going to tell us who you are for real, hold on to the details.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
anon
Anon
anon
" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'


Actually, yes, I am an expert on children, more specifically the mindset of adolescence in children from the ages of 10-16. Here is quick overview for you:
You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it, you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc.
You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him.
Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session.



- "Here is quick overview for you:"

- "You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it..." I made it 'Mr. Expert.' I was raised in the inner city and I became a professional athlete. I used my education and my earnings to raise my kids the way I want to raise them. Sure, sure genetically they most likely have a leg-up on a lot of kids but I found my way out by outworking everyone else.


- "you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc." Basically I have a side business and I'm pretty much retired @ 50 and have been married to the same woman (and yes she was an athlete too) for more than 25 years....thanks for your worry.

- "You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him." I have little to do with it at this point, he got ahead because he wanted to, he might be genetically better than a lot of kids but he knows what hard work, commitment and focus actually mean.

- "Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session."

Maybe you need to read a few books yourself and the others hit it right on the head - Worry about your own kid.




The problem with people on this board is that you think the poster is talking directly to you. Guy, nobody knows who you are! We are all making statements to the general public, not singling you out. If it makes you feel better to tell us how well you've navigated life, well I think that's a little weird. Unless you're going to tell us who you are for real, hold on to the details.


Nobody on this thread is topping this post.

Well done.

Re: Kids burnt out

So let's all just stick to broad insults and generalizations. And the 'sorry your kid got cut' and 'your (sic) an idiot.'

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
anon
anon
Anon
anon
" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'


Actually, yes, I am an expert on children, more specifically the mindset of adolescence in children from the ages of 10-16. Here is quick overview for you:
You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it, you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc.
You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him.
Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session.



- "Here is quick overview for you:"

- "You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it..." I made it 'Mr. Expert.' I was raised in the inner city and I became a professional athlete. I used my education and my earnings to raise my kids the way I want to raise them. Sure, sure genetically they most likely have a leg-up on a lot of kids but I found my way out by outworking everyone else.


- "you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc." Basically I have a side business and I'm pretty much retired @ 50 and have been married to the same woman (and yes she was an athlete too) for more than 25 years....thanks for your worry.

- "You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him." I have little to do with it at this point, he got ahead because he wanted to, he might be genetically better than a lot of kids but he knows what hard work, commitment and focus actually mean.

- "Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session."

Maybe you need to read a few books yourself and the others hit it right on the head - Worry about your own kid.




The problem with people on this board is that you think the poster is talking directly to you. Guy, nobody knows who you are! We are all making statements to the general public, not singling you out. If it makes you feel better to tell us how well you've navigated life, well I think that's a little weird. Unless you're going to tell us who you are for real, hold on to the details.


Nobody on this thread is topping this post.

Well done.


Fine. You want to know who I am........ I am Batman

Re: Kids burnt out

Hey life story guy, do you Jenny from the block? Even with the rocks that she has got, She is still Jenny from the block.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
The problem with people on this board is that you think the poster is talking directly to you. Guy, nobody knows who you are! We are all making statements to the general public, not singling you out. If it makes you feel better to tell us how well you've navigated life, well I think that's a little weird. Unless you're going to tell us who you are for real, hold on to the details.


The REAL problem is that the guy responded to a clearly trolling post. I knew when I saw it that it would boomerang on the guy. Which, of course, is the exact response the troll was counting on.

But beyond that, the problem is when people pretend their personal experiences make them experts. They make blanket statements like they are the be-all, end-all authorities. Sure, their personal experiences are shared by others, but when words like "all," "most," or "every" creep in, they're over-reaching. If the Boards weren't anonymous they would filter these know-it-all comments. If they act like this IRL, then they are friendless, the guy standing at the corner glass by himself.

The flip side of this is people that reply in the first person, also using their own experiences, to invalidate the know-it-alls. Of course, their experiences aren't unique, either, but are replicated over and over by others. They are just choosing to not assume to be speaking for others.

So both people are speaking from the same knowledge base, just in different ways.

Re: Kids burnt out

This post went in weird direction. What is the general consensus of the topic. Do kids up to Bantam Major generally need some time off or is this now a 12 month sport? After Bantam Major due you have to play in spring/summer to be noticed if your not in the top 5%?

Re: Kids burnt out

The answer is yes. The trolling know it all town hockey guy knows zero about hockey. I've been told numerous times regarding spring & summer hockey from coaches - hey, I don't have time to come out and look at kids during the season, I have to come out during the summer.

Town hockey players aren't getting any looks so don't worry about them. No junior or college coaches are going to town a games looking at players.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
The answer is yes. The trolling know it all town hockey guy knows zero about hockey. I've been told numerous times regarding spring & summer hockey from coaches - hey, I don't have time to come out and look at kids during the season, I have to come out during the summer.

Town hockey players aren't getting any looks so don't worry about them. No junior or college coaches are going to town a games looking at players.


Have fun trashing the losers who play town but understand what you're describing applies to only players on elite teams. The kids in the mid to lower levels of select aren't getting any looks either.

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
anon
The answer is yes. The trolling know it all town hockey guy knows zero about hockey. I've been told numerous times regarding spring & summer hockey from coaches - hey, I don't have time to come out and look at kids during the season, I have to come out during the summer.

Town hockey players aren't getting any looks so don't worry about them. No junior or college coaches are going to town a games looking at players.


Have fun trashing the losers who play town but understand what you're describing applies to only players on elite teams. The kids in the mid to lower levels of select aren't getting any looks either.


Wrong. They are being seen by coaches and scouts even if they are at the lower end of the talent. My son was the youngest being a late, late December kid for years. He hung with it, took the bruises and then he grew. Once he got big he became noticed by junior coaches which never would have happened if he didn't play in better leagues. Happy to say it got him into a school he most likely wouldn't have gotten into. It does happen.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
The answer is yes. The trolling know it all town hockey guy knows zero about hockey. I've been told numerous times regarding spring & summer hockey from coaches - hey, I don't have time to come out and look at kids during the season, I have to come out during the summer.

Town hockey players aren't getting any looks so don't worry about them. No junior or college coaches are going to town a games looking at players.


And I'll go back to my point that 80 percent of them will be done by age 15, so that means only 20 percent of them should even consider playing through the spring and summer. Anyone know the percentages? Maybe the hockey parent community is getting it right. I suspect not, but I don't know.

If you're in that 20 percent (be realistic), then yes you need to continue skating throughout the off-season if you expect to keep making teams.

Re: Kids burnt out

Wow, Its been awhile since I been on here, glad to see everyone has kept there sanity.

Re: Kids burnt out

Im just going to leave this here

http://www.admkids.com/page/show/990393-w-is-for-windows-of-trainability

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
This post went in weird direction. What is the general consensus of the topic. Do kids up to Bantam Major generally need some time off or is this now a 12 month sport? After Bantam Major due you have to play in spring/summer to be noticed if your not in the top 5%?
The general consensus is, it depends on the kid. You could push one kid and turn him off. You could push another the same age and he will thrive.

Somewhere between 10 and 16, it becomes year round for the kids that want to play at the higher levels. Where in that age range it is will differ by kid, and what he wants to accomplish.

It wasn't that way even a short time ago. Even USA Hockey contradicts themselves by encouraging kids playing multiple sports, but then making their NTDP kids give up all other sports as soon as they become their "asset."

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
This post went in weird direction. What is the general consensus of the topic. Do kids up to Bantam Major generally need some time off or is this now a 12 month sport? After Bantam Major due you have to play in spring/summer to be noticed if your not in the top 5%?


I, think, Cap, is, back, wearing, a, beard, and, stirring, the, pot.,

Re: Kids burnt out

Her therapist told her - no DBoard no matter how good you think your philosophical thoughts for the day may be.

Re: Kids burnt out

Every kid is different and it's not so much they get burnt out its that their bodies break down and are more easily injured but if you have the money and time, and your kid really wants to play then have a blast. The only thing I have seen is that kids will pick up some bad habits during spring/summer hockey so make sure you sprinkle in some skills to keep them on track and your winter coaches happy! Remember folks, 1/2 these kids are done by 16, minds well have some fun along the way

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
Every kid is different and it's not so much they get burnt out its that their bodies break down and are more easily injured but if you have the money and time, and your kid really wants to play then have a blast. The only thing I have seen is that kids will pick up some bad habits during spring/summer hockey so make sure you sprinkle in some skills to keep them on track and your winter coaches happy! Remember folks, 1/2 these kids are done by 16, minds well have some fun along the way
Good post. Couple of things.

The point you raise about injury is actually one of the long-term benefits of summer hockey. That's why you have to build gradually. You can't throw him into year round hockey at 15 when you suddenly realize he needs to improve to make Varsity. By starting slowly somewhere around 11 - 13, depending on the kid, and then increasing the intensity, you will find that he is actually better prepared physically and mentally for the regular season.

Your second point about picking up bad habits is also good. Spring /summer hockey shouldn't be about games. It should be about skills. It may be next to impossible to maintain a 3:1 (ADM) or 4:1 (European) practice-to-game ratio in the regular season. It should be the goal in the summer.

Re: Kids burnt out

kids should play multiple sports not one sport year round..it makes them a better player on the ice. They learn how to read their opponent, take angles and stay between a player and the goal and so much more. Most NHL players agree and have been very vocal about it lately. It is a no-brainer. My son was recruited to Prep school to play hockey and will make varsity Lacrosse as a freshman..

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
Most NHL players agree and have been very vocal about it lately. It is a no-brainer. My son was recruited to Prep school to play hockey and will make varsity Lacrosse as a freshman..
Really? Most? You do know that "most" means at least 50.1%, right?

So more than 300 of NHL players played multiple sports? And have spoken out on the subject recently? Must be a pretty long article!

"Most" Canadian players never played another sport with any regularity. And "most" U.S. players that make it to the NHL stopped playing multiple sports when they were your Prep star's age. Even the USNTDP won't allow kids to play multiple sports. Do you think for a second if it were true that "it makes them a better player on the ice, they learn how to read their opponent, take angles and stay between a player and the goal and so much more" that the USNTDP wouldn't be tapped into it?

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
anon
Most NHL players agree and have been very vocal about it lately. It is a no-brainer. My son was recruited to Prep school to play hockey and will make varsity Lacrosse as a freshman..
Really? Most? You do know that "most" means at least 50.1%, right?

So more than 300 of NHL players played multiple sports? And have spoken out on the subject recently? Must be a pretty long article!

"Most" Canadian players never played another sport with any regularity. And "most" U.S. players that make it to the NHL stopped playing multiple sports when they were your Prep star's age. Even the USNTDP won't allow kids to play multiple sports. Do you think for a second if it were true that "it makes them a better player on the ice, they learn how to read their opponent, take angles and stay between a player and the goal and so much more" that the USNTDP wouldn't be tapped into it?


IMHO, kids should be Encouraged to play multiple sports (and activities for that matter, at a younger age). Give them an opportunity to experience different things. You never know what kind of Genius they might have!

By the time the are 14 or 15, they may decide to focus on one sport or they may find they like the break in the spring and play lax, baseball, tennis, golf or whatever. To each their own. If a kid has the talent to play hockey at a high level, taking two or three months off for another sport is not going to set them back. It probably will recharge them!

At a younger age, definitely encourage multiple sports and activities.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
Anon
anon
" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'


Actually, yes, I am an expert on children, more specifically the mindset of adolescence in children from the ages of 10-16. Here is quick overview for you:
You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it, you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc.
You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him.
Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session.



- "Here is quick overview for you:"

- "You push your kid to hard because you couldnt make it..." I made it 'Mr. Expert.' I was raised in the inner city and I became a professional athlete. I used my education and my earnings to raise my kids the way I want to raise them. Sure, sure genetically they most likely have a leg-up on a lot of kids but I found my way out by outworking everyone else.


- "you also put all of your efforts into your kids "hockey career" because you are unhappy with your job, sposue, etc." Basically I have a side business and I'm pretty much retired @ 50 and have been married to the same woman (and yes she was an athlete too) for more than 25 years....thanks for your worry.

- "You feel your actions are admirable but in reality the only thing you have in common with your son is hockey and you are ruining the experience for him." I have little to do with it at this point, he got ahead because he wanted to, he might be genetically better than a lot of kids but he knows what hard work, commitment and focus actually mean.

- "Your welcome, back to yelling "Outside Edge" let me know if you would like to book a session."

Maybe you need to read a few books yourself and the others hit it right on the head - Worry about your own kid.




Please, tell us more about yourself..Do you like long walks on the beach? Whats your sign? Fact is kids are getting burnt out and customers are buying right into it.

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
" Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest. "

So you're an expert on 'Most kids' physiology, skating ability, temperament, their outside schedule & activities, their level of interest and about 30 other variables?

I've been around hockey a long time and EVERY KID could use edge work and skating instruction in the off season. In fact I'm so sure they could use it that I can tell you NHL players work on it in the summer. It doesn't hurt them, make them slower, make them tired....

O.K., I think this goes back to the old 'worry about your own kid.'


No, I'm not an expert, I'm just trying to inject some common sense into a topic that seems to be a source of physical and financial strain for many players and families, and lines the pockets of borderline predatory hockey organizations making promises that they can't possibly keep. As always, it's the parents' role to make a realistic assessment of where your boy stands and to spend your time and money accordingly. I think you can agree this is not happening in many cases out there.

Here's a fact: most kids in youth hockey won't continue playing into high school. 70-80 percent attrition rate by age 15. Maybe your kid is in the minority, and I encourage you to provide him with the opportunity to reach his full potential by keeping him going through the spring and summer seasons (I do with mine). But the way things are set up right now, most will be out of the sport in a few years. Maybe the spring/summer would be better spent learning another sport or skill that they can pick up at 16 when their hockey career is over.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3871410/

Re: Kids burnt out

anon
Anon
anon

Let me guess, you played back in the late 90's or earlier right when everything was done with a handshake and a beer? Times have changed my friend, unless you are a 1% player, decisions for admission to a school are made by admission officers based on grades, recommendation letters, and interviews.
Keep running Jr into the ground, makes my guys chances better.
My kid is a recruited player at a Keller school RIGHT NOW. He happens to have the grades/scores/recommendations/interview skills to have gotten into his (and other) school on merit. That makes him different than his teammates. These schools recruit HEAVILY, and academic capability comes last. Yes, they want to make sure the kid can make grades - they want the athlete for at least three years - but their grades/scores are below those of kids from better schools with better grades that aren't athletes, that are being turned down by Admissions.

And even though he was a Top 6 player as a Freshman, he is working his butt off this summer, because if he doesn't improve and get stronger, there's a new recruit that they won't hesitate for one second to replace him with.

So, every spring/summer since he was 10, when HE said he wanted to play Spring hockey, I've gradually increased the intensity of his off season work, bit by bit, year after year. Rather than being "burnt out," he has come into the season each year as a much better player that he was during tryouts, moving right past kids, hungrier than ever to improve.

Success breeds confidence, and confidence breeds success.


Not the prior poster.

Clearly you got it right and your kid is on a different level talent-wise than his peers. But we need to be careful about spreading advice or advocating that the tuba players keep playing through the spring and summer. That doesn't help them and it doesn't help the more serious player looking for a good competitive off-season skate. Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest.
And I'm not the tuba playing poster.

Don't take this the wrong way. You don't have a basis for saying that "Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating." You have a sample size of one, no different than me.

But, every kid that my kid has skated with in the spring/summer has benefited from it.

That's different than saying that every kid that skates in the spring/summer benefits.

The difference is the quality of the instruction. Playing on tournament teams every weekend isn't going to result in as much benefit as doing three weeks of Lovell Development Camp or going through Dynamic's Max Hockey program. But, not every kid will want to do those programs.

You have to know your kid, and know what he wants to do with his tuba playing. If he wants to play at the highest local levels, he needs to work consistently at it. Less so at 10 than at 15. There isn't any shortcut.

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
anon
Anon
anon

Let me guess, you played back in the late 90's or earlier right when everything was done with a handshake and a beer? Times have changed my friend, unless you are a 1% player, decisions for admission to a school are made by admission officers based on grades, recommendation letters, and interviews.
Keep running Jr into the ground, makes my guys chances better.
My kid is a recruited player at a Keller school RIGHT NOW. He happens to have the grades/scores/recommendations/interview skills to have gotten into his (and other) school on merit. That makes him different than his teammates. These schools recruit HEAVILY, and academic capability comes last. Yes, they want to make sure the kid can make grades - they want the athlete for at least three years - but their grades/scores are below those of kids from better schools with better grades that aren't athletes, that are being turned down by Admissions.

And even though he was a Top 6 player as a Freshman, he is working his butt off this summer, because if he doesn't improve and get stronger, there's a new recruit that they won't hesitate for one second to replace him with.

So, every spring/summer since he was 10, when HE said he wanted to play Spring hockey, I've gradually increased the intensity of his off season work, bit by bit, year after year. Rather than being "burnt out," he has come into the season each year as a much better player that he was during tryouts, moving right past kids, hungrier than ever to improve.

Success breeds confidence, and confidence breeds success.


Not the prior poster.

Clearly you got it right and your kid is on a different level talent-wise than his peers. But we need to be careful about spreading advice or advocating that the tuba players keep playing through the spring and summer. That doesn't help them and it doesn't help the more serious player looking for a good competitive off-season skate. Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating as much as they would from the rest.
And I'm not the tuba playing poster.

Don't take this the wrong way. You don't have a basis for saying that "Most kids do not benefit from spring/summer skating." You have a sample size of one, no different than me.

But, every kid that my kid has skated with in the spring/summer has benefited from it.

That's different than saying that every kid that skates in the spring/summer benefits.

The difference is the quality of the instruction. Playing on tournament teams every weekend isn't going to result in as much benefit as doing three weeks of Lovell Development Camp or going through Dynamic's Max Hockey program. But, not every kid will want to do those programs.

You have to know your kid, and know what he wants to do with his tuba playing. If he wants to play at the highest local levels, he needs to work consistently at it. Less so at 10 than at 15. There isn't any shortcut.


Last paragraph hits it on the head.

Don't misunderstand my post. I'm not against spring/summer hockey. I think it's necessary for any player wishing to continue playing at a high level into their teens. Problem is, most players will no longer be playing in their teens, so most players do not benefit from the extra work because they simply don't have the ability or drive to continue playing when the game gets more difficult.

Re: Kids burnt out

Anon
You have to know your kid, and know what he wants to do with his tuba playing. If he wants to play at the highest local levels, he needs to work consistently at it. Less so at 10 than at 15. There isn't any shortcut.


oddly, new research is now pointing AWAY from the 10k hours of practice especially at a younger (pre-HS) age.

further there is a real concern by specializing too early (again pre-HS), you may overlook the child's true talent and/or passion.

Re: Kids burnt out

Correct. Science shows that a kid NOT playing the game and sitting on the couch playing video games eating chips has a greater chance of playing high school sports. Don't practice or work at anything, skill will just happen. If not, it's the coach's or system's fault.

Re: Kids burnt out

Everyone Gets A Trophy
Correct. Science shows that a kid NOT playing the game and sitting on the couch playing video games eating chips has a greater chance of playing high school sports. Don't practice or work at anything, skill will just happen. If not, it's the coach's or system's fault.

Science also shows that if you actually act like and adult and parent your kids correctly things like that can be avoided. Grow up, you deserve to be robbed by all of these spring /summer tournaments.

Re: Kids burnt out

Can we all agree it's not one great extreme or the other?

Teach your kids to work hard, be committed and recognize how fortunate they are to have these experiences.

Nothing wrong with working hard in the offseason to get to where you want to be. If these were inner city kids who looked at " Their Sport" as a way out, we would applaud them for staying out of trouble and being so committed. The difference is with hockey, it has really turned into a rich kids sport that is in no means a gateway to a better life. In many cases it is just the opposite; play two years of "pay to play" jr's, so they can play college hockey at a low level div 3 school with mediocre academic standards. Time may be better spent with academic endeavors.

However, with all that being said; Work Hard, Stay Committed, Dream Big, Enjoy the Ride.

Re: Kids burnt out

Everyone Gets A Trophy
Science shows that a kid NOT playing the game and sitting on the couch playing video games eating chips has a greater chance of playing high school sports. Don't practice or work at anything, skill will just happen. If not, it's the coach's or system's fault.


what science is NOW pointing out is 'going to practice' is much different from 'being motivated to practice': practicing 2 hours a day everyday for the year will yield less than a person that practices far less but is 'all in' during that time. and we ALL notice it at practice with some 'going thru the motions' or all during the last 'sprint' in a monster/suicide drill. so what is being achieved?

of course that begs the question: since 99%+ will not make it to college for sports should we not send them to 'math camp' for the summer?

fine, you want your child out of the house 'doing something' so no big deal doing a week camp but to expect results is a reach.

Re: Kids burnt out

beatcuff
Everyone Gets A Trophy
Science shows that a kid NOT playing the game and sitting on the couch playing video games eating chips has a greater chance of playing high school sports. Don't practice or work at anything, skill will just happen. If not, it's the coach's or system's fault.


what science is NOW pointing out is 'going to practice' is much different from 'being motivated to practice': practicing 2 hours a day everyday for the year will yield less than a person that practices far less but is 'all in' during that time. and we ALL notice it at practice with some 'going thru the motions' or all during the last 'sprint' in a monster/suicide drill. so what is being achieved?

of course that begs the question: since 99%+ will not make it to college for sports should we not send them to 'math camp' for the summer?

fine, you want your child out of the house 'doing something' so no big deal doing a week camp but to expect results is a reach.



"Perfect practice make for perfect play"

Weekly skills are much more productive than a week long camp! Better off giving it everything for 50 minutes once or twice a week than 4 hours of ice for four or five days in a row.