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2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

My son is an '08. This will be his first year of EHF Elite coming up.
So far he's only played EHF Tier 1 and does very well at that level.
I don't know anything about this camp, but it was suggested to us that my son try it.
$395. Does anyone have experience with it? Is it worth it?

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

I have had two friends who's kids played for the Jr Bruins brick team. Both said they didn't do the evaluation camp. From what I understand its definitely not needed to make the brick team if that is your goal. It is also my understanding that the team is pretty much picked but maybe for a couple of spots.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

Anony
My son is an '08. This will be his first year of EHF Elite coming up.
So far he's only played EHF Tier 1 and does very well at that level.
I don't know anything about this camp, but it was suggested to us that my son try it.
$395. Does anyone have experience with it? Is it worth it?


If you have $400 to donate to the Brick team cost go for it. 90% of the Brick team is picked by now. Its all on who you know. Don't do it.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

Decent camp, not better than other local camps. You do NOT need to go to the camp to make the Brick. I would say they have 75% of the team picked already in their minds. Most kids who are in the mix won't be at that camp. That's a fact.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

My son is an 08 and attended last year. Half of the kids from this year's team did attend. I assume the same will be picked for next year's team. No skill training, more of a summer league scrimmage. You do receive a summarized evaluation from 3-5 coaches based on basic skills (skating, shooting, etc.).

IMO, you will get more for your money if he attends a weekly power skating/skills session. He will be playing against the same kids in the EHF elite this season anyway.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

Thanks for the responses. Sounds like a $$ grab. We're not really interested in playing for the Brick team, but it was suggested to me by his coach that my son should do the evaluation, so I at least had to find out what it was all about.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

Ya ok your not interested in playing in the brick! What kind of clown gets on a message board to ask about an evaluation camp and says I'm thinking about sending my kid but your not interested in playing in the tournament?! Were you hoping that people would say your tier 1 player now that he made an EHF elite team would be a shoe in for Edmonton?? Or where you hoping that someone would bad mouth the jr bruins organization or the kids that play for the team. Everything in hockey is a money grab . When are all you idiots gonna learn that you ultimately choose to do it or not. Skills instructors shooting coaches tournaments -they all cost money it's a business folks. And yes most of the best players around do play for that 08 team. Not to say that things can change in 11 months. I read this board for pure entertainment and I'm sick of idiots that post stuff hoping to draw out other idiots to make negative comments/opinions of kids parents and organizations. Grow up

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

There are at least 3 spots open on the 08 Jr Bruins Brick team as some of these top players live in CT and NY and are not eligible for this team.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

InThe Know
There are at least 3 spots open on the 08 Jr Bruins Brick team as some of these top players live in CT and NY and are not eligible for this team.


Which is mind boggling why the parents of those kids drive past or ignore their regional Brick team to play for the Junior Bruins. Not slamming the Junior B's, great product and well run. But Honestly the CJR program is very strong as well.

The parents of those kids knew this was coming and now will be fighting for spots against established CJR players with the possibility of being sidelined. If the CJR team doesn't pick them and they aren't granted a waiver...no brick for you!

This happens every year and it will continue to happen. I have personally witnessed it twice and kids are usually really bummed out.



Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

To be frank... those "out of district" players are the best in the mix. So... seems like there's a lot more than 3 spots available!
Ha!

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

avoid this nonsense as long as you can. Complete waste of money. This year, Masters left 2 fathers in charge and went home early. Team was out of playoffs then blazed back to Mass and left team in Edmonton with 2 dads coaching. What a f'ing joke. STAY AWAY.

And please don't say he went home to be with family. Of course he did. With all our money!!!!

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

black
avoid this nonsense as long as you can. Complete waste of money. This year, Masters left 2 fathers in charge and went home early. Team was out of playoffs then blazed back to Mass and left team in Edmonton with 2 dads coaching. What a f'ing joke. STAY AWAY.

And please don't say he went home to be with family. Of course he did. With all our money!!!!
What does any of that have to do with what the OP is asking about? It's a business. They are in it to make money. If you owned a business you would know the demands on your time are relentless. Plus, their dad just passed. How the **** do you know what they needed to pay attention to?

A "complete waste of money" would be if your kid shows up at the rink and doesn't get to skate. So, it's not a "complete waste of money," no matter what it is. It sounds like the OP's kid has some potential, if his coach is willing to go to bat for him and get him an invite. The kid gets to "try on" his new role and see how it feels. Dad may see, or someone may point out something to him, that his kid can work on between the camp and the start of the season that could set him up for a good year.

How is any of that a "complete waste of money?"

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

I would not say that those regional players will not be on the roster. I know of at least one who has "moved" here already to play in the EHF this season. It wouldn't surprise me if the others followed suit. This particular year is inbred amongst themselves. I would distance myself. Any sort of perceived opportunity isn't worth it. Ask almost any past Brick participant.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

they are 10 - get over the Brick. It's a great tourney w/ lots of great players, and Jr Bruins organization does a great job identifying them. Look at prior teams, most of the kids are doing very well 3-5 years later. But by no means is it the end all be all. I wouldn't lose sleep over playing in it or not playing in it.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

anon
they are 10 - get over the Brick. It's a great tourney w/ lots of great players, and Jr Bruins organization does a great job identifying them. Look at prior teams, most of the kids are doing very well 3-5 years later. But by no means is it the end all be all. I wouldn't lose sleep over playing in it or not playing in it.

My advice would be to do as much of the Brick stuff as you can, get your kid on the ice with those stronger players as often as you can, but stop short of actually committing to go to the tournament. Best case scenario for your player's development and your hockey budget. Masters runs a good program and attracts a lot of the top talent around at the squirt age level. If you're able to get involved with that group, I wouldn't pass that up.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

That was my past impression however buyer beware and choose your camps wisely. Some are controlled scrimmages, and I haven't heard one good review of the Jay Peak camp yet when it came down to the on-ice program.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

Anon
That was my past impression however buyer beware and choose your camps wisely. Some are controlled scrimmages, and I haven't heard one good review of the Jay Peak camp yet when it came down to the on-ice program.


I wouldn't consider the Jay Peak camp to be a Brick event. So you're right, make sure you understand what you're getting into.

Specialization

You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.

Re: Specialization

anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.

Re: Specialization

anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.

Re: Specialization

Anon
anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.
Actually it is. I have never read or heard anywhere that "if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey." It's an asinine statement.

Lots of kids play their sports - all sports - year round, At 10, a recreational Little Leaguer is not going to be "the best" when he is on a team with kids where baseball is their main sport - who also, mind you, are probably equally athletically inclined.

Re: Specialization

anon
Anon
anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.
Actually it is. I have never read or heard anywhere that "if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey." It's an asinine statement.

Lots of kids play their sports - all sports - year round, At 10, a recreational Little Leaguer is not going to be "the best" when he is on a team with kids where baseball is their main sport - who also, mind you, are probably equally athletically inclined.


No one ever said that the kid has to be the best at every sport he plays, I believe the phrase used was "one of the top kids". Nor did anyone say that he wouldn't have a future in hockey. Just not the future that most people on this board envision for their kid. But that's ok, continue to twist things to fit your narrative.

Re: Specialization

Anon
anon
Anon
anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.
Actually it is. I have never read or heard anywhere that "if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey." It's an asinine statement.

Lots of kids play their sports - all sports - year round, At 10, a recreational Little Leaguer is not going to be "the best" when he is on a team with kids where baseball is their main sport - who also, mind you, are probably equally athletically inclined.


No one ever said that the kid has to be the best at every sport he plays, I believe the phrase used was "one of the top kids". Nor did anyone say that he wouldn't have a future in hockey. Just not the future that most people on this board envision for their kid. But that's ok, continue to twist things to fit your narrative.


"But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey" So my 10 year old golfs but isn't the best golfer, he should just hang em up? He just got back from the Brick, put up some good points but we should call it quits because hes a bogey golfer. Hes also second line midfield on the Brine National team but he pulls his 5 iron so hes done...such a disappointment!

Re: Specialization

anon
Anon
anon
Anon
anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.
Actually it is. I have never read or heard anywhere that "if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey." It's an asinine statement.

Lots of kids play their sports - all sports - year round, At 10, a recreational Little Leaguer is not going to be "the best" when he is on a team with kids where baseball is their main sport - who also, mind you, are probably equally athletically inclined.


No one ever said that the kid has to be the best at every sport he plays, I believe the phrase used was "one of the top kids". Nor did anyone say that he wouldn't have a future in hockey. Just not the future that most people on this board envision for their kid. But that's ok, continue to twist things to fit your narrative.


"But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey" So my 10 year old golfs but isn't the best golfer, he should just hang em up? He just got back from the Brick, put up some good points but we should call it quits because hes a bogey golfer. Hes also second line midfield on the Brine National team but he pulls his 5 iron so hes done...such a disappointment!

You're making an absurd argument to try and discredit his point. But the fact remains, the kids that have the athletic ability are the ones that will rise to the top once they are all about the same size and they all start to specialize. Until then, those kids will be near the top of every sport that they choose to play. Nobody's born a great hockey player, they are born a great athlete that chooses to focus on hockey.

Re: Specialization

We all went to school with kids who made it to d1 and beyond in a sport. In my experience, without exception, the kids growing up who played at that level were outstanding in every sport they played. And most could have switched along the way and played in college at another sport they played. The importance of pure atheticism cannot be understated. I don't care what anyone says, you cannot spend enough or skate your 9 year old enough to manufacture a high level player if he doesn't have dominant physical ability. And I'm no geneticist but I bet a tremendous amount of that ability comes from mom and dad. So looking in the mirror, I'd say my kids need to study hard and make good friends.

Re: Specialization

100% spot on. The d1 kids are dominant in every sport as kids and often times could have played another d1 sport in college but had to make a choice at some point. You can start a kid early, skate year round and manufacture a hockey player at 9-12 years old. The true elite athletes will be the d1 kids down the road once they finish growing and specialize. And there are very very few of them.

Re: Specialization

anon
anon
Anon
anon
Anon
anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.
Actually it is. I have never read or heard anywhere that "if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey." It's an asinine statement.

Lots of kids play their sports - all sports - year round, At 10, a recreational Little Leaguer is not going to be "the best" when he is on a team with kids where baseball is their main sport - who also, mind you, are probably equally athletically inclined.


No one ever said that the kid has to be the best at every sport he plays, I believe the phrase used was "one of the top kids". Nor did anyone say that he wouldn't have a future in hockey. Just not the future that most people on this board envision for their kid. But that's ok, continue to twist things to fit your narrative.


"But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey" So my 10 year old golfs but isn't the best golfer, he should just hang em up? He just got back from the Brick, put up some good points but we should call it quits because hes a bogey golfer. Hes also second line midfield on the Brine National team but he pulls his 5 iron so hes done...such a disappointment!

You're making an absurd argument to try and discredit his point. But the fact remains, the kids that have the athletic ability are the ones that will rise to the top once they are all about the same size and they all start to specialize. Until then, those kids will be near the top of every sport that they choose to play. Nobody's born a great hockey player, they are born a great athlete that chooses to focus on hockey.


100% accurate. As you go up the pyramid in any sport the constant is the athletic ability floor jumps. Go to any nhl team and every guy is a great athlete. Just watch some of these guys with the soccer circle before warm ups in the hall and most could jump into a d-3 college soccer program with no effort. Some who played growing up could probably play d-1. At an early age multiple sports helps athletic development.

Re: Specialization

Anon
anon
anon
Anon
anon
Anon
anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.
Actually it is. I have never read or heard anywhere that "if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey." It's an asinine statement.

Lots of kids play their sports - all sports - year round, At 10, a recreational Little Leaguer is not going to be "the best" when he is on a team with kids where baseball is their main sport - who also, mind you, are probably equally athletically inclined.


No one ever said that the kid has to be the best at every sport he plays, I believe the phrase used was "one of the top kids". Nor did anyone say that he wouldn't have a future in hockey. Just not the future that most people on this board envision for their kid. But that's ok, continue to twist things to fit your narrative.


"But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey" So my 10 year old golfs but isn't the best golfer, he should just hang em up? He just got back from the Brick, put up some good points but we should call it quits because hes a bogey golfer. Hes also second line midfield on the Brine National team but he pulls his 5 iron so hes done...such a disappointment!

You're making an absurd argument to try and discredit his point. But the fact remains, the kids that have the athletic ability are the ones that will rise to the top once they are all about the same size and they all start to specialize. Until then, those kids will be near the top of every sport that they choose to play. Nobody's born a great hockey player, they are born a great athlete that chooses to focus on hockey.


100% accurate. As you go up the pyramid in any sport the constant is the athletic ability floor jumps. Go to any nhl team and every guy is a great athlete. Just watch some of these guys with the soccer circle before warm ups in the hall and most could jump into a d-3 college soccer program with no effort. Some who played growing up could probably play d-1. At an early age multiple sports helps athletic development.


This is 100% accurate. I was the best at every sport I played and I made it all the way here to the dboard! Some day, your 10 y/o will be posting here.

Fact!

Re: Specialization

Anon
anon
Anon
anon
anon
You can specialize to potentially give your kid a leg up and politically maneuver your kid onto every spring team, and top team out there. But remember, if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey. By 14-16 the athletes will prevail especially when they decide to focus on one sport. So for a litmus test, instead of chasing every spring / summer tourney out there - put your kid on a baseball field or on a lacrosse field or on a golf course. If he's not one of top kids in everything he does, stop chasing the dream and just enjoy the ride.


This is the most ridiculous thing I have read in a long time. Get a clue.


Actually it's not. It's close to being spot on. It just doesn't fit the narrative you've created for your kid where he becomes one of 2-3% who play beyond HS.
Actually it is. I have never read or heard anywhere that "if your kid is 10 and he's not the best at every sport he plays - there's no future in hockey." It's an asinine statement.

Lots of kids play their sports - all sports - year round, At 10, a recreational Little Leaguer is not going to be "the best" when he is on a team with kids where baseball is their main sport - who also, mind you, are probably equally athletically inclined.


No one ever said that the kid has to be the best at every sport he plays, I believe the phrase used was "one of the top kids". Nor did anyone say that he wouldn't have a future in hockey. Just not the future that most people on this board envision for their kid. But that's ok, continue to twist things to fit your narrative.
Another all-time low in D Board history.

Dude, those little comma thingies up in the air are called quotation marks. They mean that whatever is in between them is a direct quote.

Both of those statements you claim "no one ever said" are exactly what was said. Which is why I called them asinine statements.

Now, can you explain how that's twisting things, even a little?

Re: Specialization

Athleticism, stature, iq, compete level, passion...100% accurate...pass the popcorn...

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

Anon
Ya ok your not interested in playing in the brick! What kind of clown gets on a message board to ask about an evaluation camp and says I'm thinking about sending my kid but your not interested in playing in the tournament?! Were you hoping that people would say your tier 1 player now that he made an EHF elite team would be a shoe in for Edmonton?? Or where you hoping that someone would bad mouth the jr bruins organization or the kids that play for the team. Everything in hockey is a money grab . When are all you idiots gonna learn that you ultimately choose to do it or not. Skills instructors shooting coaches tournaments -they all cost money it's a business folks. And yes most of the best players around do play for that 08 team. Not to say that things can change in 11 months. I read this board for pure entertainment and I'm sick of idiots that post stuff hoping to draw out other idiots to make negative comments/opinions of kids parents and organizations. Grow up


Buddy, you're about two sentences away from a heart attack. Take it easy for @!#% sake.

For the OP...at the end of the day it's $400. It's a drop in the bucket for what you're going to "invest" in your kids hockey endeavor. My kid went several years back. Looking back, it was a decent experience. It's not an open camp, you need to get a coach recommendation and be playing for a qualifying team (in the jr b's eyes) so there's a little accomplishment in just being there. When we attended, there were no scrubs. Everyone could play pretty well.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

anon
Anon
Ya ok your not interested in playing in the brick! What kind of clown gets on a message board to ask about an evaluation camp and says I'm thinking about sending my kid but your not interested in playing in the tournament?! Were you hoping that people would say your tier 1 player now that he made an EHF elite team would be a shoe in for Edmonton?? Or where you hoping that someone would bad mouth the jr bruins organization or the kids that play for the team. Everything in hockey is a money grab . When are all you idiots gonna learn that you ultimately choose to do it or not. Skills instructors shooting coaches tournaments -they all cost money it's a business folks. And yes most of the best players around do play for that 08 team. Not to say that things can change in 11 months. I read this board for pure entertainment and I'm sick of idiots that post stuff hoping to draw out other idiots to make negative comments/opinions of kids parents and organizations. Grow up


Buddy, you're about two sentences away from a heart attack. Take it easy for @!#% sake.

For the OP...at the end of the day it's $400. It's a drop in the bucket for what you're going to "invest" in your kids hockey endeavor. My kid went several years back. Looking back, it was a decent experience. It's not an open camp, you need to get a coach recommendation and be playing for a qualifying team (in the jr b's eyes) so there's a little accomplishment in just being there. When we attended, there were no scrubs. Everyone could play pretty well.
And, if your kid's coach suggested it, even if he has a profit motive (you didn't indicate he does), unless it's creating a financial or logistical hardship, I would do it. You don't want to be one of "those parents" that the coach sees as being "hard of hearing."

I would take it as a good thing that he is thinking about your kid. If he didn't see potential there, he wouldn't be bothering.

Re: 2017 Brick Training & Evaluation Camp

anon
Anon
Ya ok your not interested in playing in the brick! What kind of clown gets on a message board to ask about an evaluation camp and says I'm thinking about sending my kid but your not interested in playing in the tournament?! Were you hoping that people would say your tier 1 player now that he made an EHF elite team would be a shoe in for Edmonton?? Or where you hoping that someone would bad mouth the jr bruins organization or the kids that play for the team. Everything in hockey is a money grab . When are all you idiots gonna learn that you ultimately choose to do it or not. Skills instructors shooting coaches tournaments -they all cost money it's a business folks. And yes most of the best players around do play for that 08 team. Not to say that things can change in 11 months. I read this board for pure entertainment and I'm sick of idiots that post stuff hoping to draw out other idiots to make negative comments/opinions of kids parents and organizations. Grow up


Buddy, you're about two sentences away from a heart attack. Take it easy for @!#% sake.

For the OP...at the end of the day it's $400. It's a drop in the bucket for what you're going to "invest" in your kids hockey endeavor. My kid went several years back. Looking back, it was a decent experience. It's not an open camp, you need to get a coach recommendation and be playing for a qualifying team (in the jr b's eyes) so there's a little accomplishment in just being there. When we attended, there were no scrubs. Everyone could play pretty well.


No kiddin', chill the f**k out, haha. Keyboard tough guy calling me a clown and an idiot because I don't know what the Brick is. I was honestly asking because I'd never heard of it and was wondering if it would be beneficial to my son. Let me know if we need to discuss it any further in person, bud.