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Youth Hockey
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Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Good advice all around, thanks. I appreciate the perspectives and just wanted to help him get better. If he gets disinterested in hockey, that is fine by me. But, he seems to really like it and I know he is down about not playing with friends who are now delineated as better than him. Thanks again.

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Just be thankful he's an 09 instead of an 08. The 08s are stacked, and he'd never catch up!

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Anon
Good advice all around, thanks. I appreciate the perspectives and just wanted to help him get better. If he gets disinterested in hockey, that is fine by me. But, he seems to really like it and I know he is down about not playing with friends who are now delineated as better than him. Thanks again.
I was in your shoes a few years back. The two years he played at the less competitive level were the best years ever in terms of his confidence. We had him play town and club during that time and his skills grew tremendously. Yes, during that time his peers appeared to "move ahead" of him, but it put a chip on his shoulder and soon enough word spread about how he was dominating at his level. When Johnny A-Team would talk and brag "I've got 13 goals so far this year", he could reply back with "I've got 30 with six hat-tricks" and the other kids who'd seen him play would back up what he said, it was almost better for his rep than playing on the A team. Four years later, he is on higher level teams now than most of his peers and the gap is widening in terms of skill level. Some of those kids who weren't cut in the past can't even get on a club team now that the kids are older.

I know you were looking for advice on what to do, so here it is: just get your kid on the ice as much as possible (two teams if you can) and let him practice and play. The "system" he's in is far less important than the drive to be better and to prove everyone wrong that he's going to get from going through this experience.

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Anon
Anon
Good advice all around, thanks. I appreciate the perspectives and just wanted to help him get better. If he gets disinterested in hockey, that is fine by me. But, he seems to really like it and I know he is down about not playing with friends who are now delineated as better than him. Thanks again.
I was in your shoes a few years back. The two years he played at the less competitive level were the best years ever in terms of his confidence. We had him play town and club during that time and his skills grew tremendously. Yes, during that time his peers appeared to "move ahead" of him, but it put a chip on his shoulder and soon enough word spread about how he was dominating at his level. When Johnny A-Team would talk and brag "I've got 13 goals so far this year", he could reply back with "I've got 30 with six hat-tricks" and the other kids who'd seen him play would back up what he said, it was almost better for his rep than playing on the A team. Four years later, he is on higher level teams now than most of his peers and the gap is widening in terms of skill level. Some of those kids who weren't cut in the past can't even get on a club team now that the kids are older.

I know you were looking for advice on what to do, so here it is: just get your kid on the ice as much as possible (two teams if you can) and let him practice and play. The "system" he's in is far less important than the drive to be better and to prove everyone wrong that he's going to get from going through this experience.
Jesus. He's 8. You people are insane.

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Anon
Anon
Good advice all around, thanks. I appreciate the perspectives and just wanted to help him get better. If he gets disinterested in hockey, that is fine by me. But, he seems to really like it and I know he is down about not playing with friends who are now delineated as better than him. Thanks again.
I was in your shoes a few years back. The two years he played at the less competitive level were the best years ever in terms of his confidence. We had him play town and club during that time and his skills grew tremendously. Yes, during that time his peers appeared to "move ahead" of him, but it put a chip on his shoulder and soon enough word spread about how he was dominating at his level. When Johnny A-Team would talk and brag "I've got 13 goals so far this year", he could reply back with "I've got 30 with six hat-tricks" and the other kids who'd seen him play would back up what he said, it was almost better for his rep than playing on the A team. Four years later, he is on higher level teams now than most of his peers and the gap is widening in terms of skill level. Some of those kids who weren't cut in the past can't even get on a club team now that the kids are older.

I know you were looking for advice on what to do, so here it is: just get your kid on the ice as much as possible (two teams if you can) and let him practice and play. The "system" he's in is far less important than the drive to be better and to prove everyone wrong that he's going to get from going through this experience.
yeah i have a bridge i could sell you as well.....

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Anon
Anon
Good advice all around, thanks. I appreciate the perspectives and just wanted to help him get better. If he gets disinterested in hockey, that is fine by me. But, he seems to really like it and I know he is down about not playing with friends who are now delineated as better than him. Thanks again.
I was in your shoes a few years back. The two years he played at the less competitive level were the best years ever in terms of his confidence. We had him play town and club during that time and his skills grew tremendously. Yes, during that time his peers appeared to "move ahead" of him, but it put a chip on his shoulder and soon enough word spread about how he was dominating at his level. When Johnny A-Team would talk and brag "I've got 13 goals so far this year", he could reply back with "I've got 30 with six hat-tricks" and the other kids who'd seen him play would back up what he said, it was almost better for his rep than playing on the A team. Four years later, he is on higher level teams now than most of his peers and the gap is widening in terms of skill level. Some of those kids who weren't cut in the past can't even get on a club team now that the kids are older.

I know you were looking for advice on what to do, so here it is: just get your kid on the ice as much as possible (two teams if you can) and let him practice and play. The "system" he's in is far less important than the drive to be better and to prove everyone wrong that he's going to get from going through this experience.
I've never seen it where scoring more goals in a lower league buys you bragging rights over kids who play in higher leagues.

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Forget the stickwork. If you're paying for ice, I would suggest you have him working on skating. He can improve his stickwork for free in the driveway.

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Anon
Forget the stickwork. If you're paying for ice, I would suggest you have him working on skating. He can improve his stickwork for free in the driveway.
Yeah focus on skating so he can be another kid flying down the ice that can't score 🙄

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Anon
Anon
Forget the stickwork. If you\'re paying for ice, I would suggest you have him working on skating. He can improve his stickwork for free in the driveway.
Yeah focus on skating so he can be another kid flying down the ice that can't score 🙄
OK so I'll qualify my post by saying, "assuming you do not have unlimited resources and time". Which most of us don't.

Re: How to salvage a bad year ahead

Happened to my kid a few years back, turned it into a positive.

My son has always been a defenseman, he told coach he was a forward, played 2/3 of the year as a forward and learned the role.

Last 1/3 of the year he went back to defenseman and they finished up in a good way.

He was the go to guy for his coach and I believe it helped him alot.