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The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

So I've read about the new rules and seen some games with the no tag offsides, icing on PK, and increased scrutiny of checking/body contact. Went to the USA Hockey site to double check the coaching requirements. I've been Level 4 with all modules for a very long time now and had background registration and Safesport up to date. Just came across where Level 4 & Level 5 coaches now have to take CE classes. I've had enough. That was supposed be a LIFETIME certification. More fees, more money, that's all this is about.

Coaching a freaking hockey team should not require as many or more certifications, background checks, CE classes, and requirements than being a freaking lawyer or carrying some other professional degree. 99.9% of us are volunteers who don't make a dime off this. Oh, but I noticed CEP Instructors and NTDP coaches are exempt from paying registration fees. How nice for them.

I am so sick of USA Hockey at this point. Rule change after rule change for the sake of making rule changes. Milking us dry in registration and certification fees. When AAU or USPHL or some other entity takes over youth and junior hockey in this country I will not shed a tear for USA Hockey because they will have done this to themselves.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Absolutely agree with your comments. I've seen a very similar 'development' in another sport I was closely associated with and it never seems to end well. The bureaucracy and administrators move everything to be in their best interests and the sport and development suffers. They work so hard to assure their own income, limit their personal and the organization's liability, pass rules to justify their existence and to increase participation so the gravy train keeps coming their way. And as long as the top 100 players and support staff at the NTDP keep the face of the game in a good light, their funding will suck the money from every level to pay for it.

When they moved checking from Peewee to Bantam it was an absolute money grab. Participation numbers fall off dramatically when checking is introduced so what did USA Hockey do? They funded and supported 'studies' pointing to the health issues associated with checking for young people and came up with the crazy notion that checking is safer when the difference in player size is at it's absolute greatest. The moms bought it, players stay on as fee paying players for two more years and the cash register rings - and the skill and development of American players decreases.

Time for a high level independent league to take over and leave USA Hockey with managing the Town Hockey programs.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

$30 USA hockey registration
$19 safe sport modules
$50 Certification class

$99 right out of the gate + time spent taking these modules. Parents, do yourselves a favor and thank your coaches for what they do.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Anon
$30 USA hockey registration
$19 safe sport modules
$50 Certification class

$99 right out of the gate + time spent taking these modules. Parents, do yourselves a favor and thank your coaches for what they do.
Shouldn't the towns and clubs be paying for this on behalf of their coaches?

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

They used to, at least the good ones did. And they also included in players bill but not so much anymore.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Anon
$30 USA hockey registration
$19 safe sport modules
$50 Certification class

$99 right out of the gate + time spent taking these modules. Parents, do yourselves a favor and thank your coaches for what they do.
Don't forget taking a day off from work for the class.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

I never missed work for a class, they were always on a Saturday or Sunday. I have been told you don’t even do the on ice portions anymore, Which to me is incredulous.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Anon
I never missed work for a class, they were always on a Saturday or Sunday. I have been told you don’t even do the on ice portions anymore, Which to me is incredulous.
When I first started going they had you go on ice and they would run you through drills. Then it became you had to go and watch a practice. Then I think they just gave up. Not coaching anymore but did like the class portion. Was just a pain to go on a weekend.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Add in the 2 day level 4 clinic that seems to be at a location that lends to an overnight trip and we are in the realm of $1000 to get to level 4. The organizations don't reimburse any of it and we are mostly volunteers.

The new rules are ridiculous and even more so at the u14 and above level. It is time to seriously think about walking away from USA hockey as they no longer represent the members of the organization.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Really as a coach you are complaining about the $99 out of pocket right away. Most coaches get 1/2 price tuition for their bender, so they saved anywhere from $1,000 to $1,800 right out of the gate.

Let us not forget you choose to coach for a couple of reasons. None of which are to make it on an NHL or collegiate bench. More commonly it is to insure playing time for you bender, or just getting him on the team. The good ones do it because the love the game and having a positive impact on their group of skaters, and they're not complaining here!

Quit your whining. Safety first. Sportsmanship next. Hockey third. Take the education and hold on to the memories forever.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Nom Nom
Really as a coach you are complaining about the $99 out of pocket right away. Most coaches get 1/2 price tuition for their bender, so they saved anywhere from $1,000 to $1,800 right out of the gate.

Let us not forget you choose to coach for a couple of reasons. None of which are to make it on an NHL or collegiate bench. More commonly it is to insure playing time for you bender, or just getting him on the team. The good ones do it because the love the game and having a positive impact on their group of skaters, and they're not complaining here!

Quit your whining. Safety first. Sportsmanship next. Hockey third. Take the education and hold on to the memories forever.
Assistant coaches have to deal with the same bs and still pay full boat. Most of us got approached to help because of our hockey backgrounds and feel compelled to help out. I'd be happy to pass the torch, and sit back with the other parents yucking it up about how ****ty the coach is, and how we'd all do a way better job. As just a parent for one kid and a coach for another, the parents have it good.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Have to agree with earlier post. Last weekend sons 2 games (u-14) were un -bearable to watch . No tag ups , slows the game down waaaay to much . Forget about the hitting . Totally clean hits ( shoulder to shoulder, D - stepping up on a forward on a one on one .. getting called . 2 players ejected and missing the next game .. it’s ridiculous games going on and on with no tempo or pace ... .. the only contact allowed was along the boards .. going to be a long season !

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

The problem with these new rules are they never really filter down to the kids until they are enforced on the ice and the game turns into a disaster. They will learn the no tag rule in 1 shift, but the majority of them are never taught the new body checking mandate. I am a ref and nobody in the rink knows the rules except for most refs and some coaches. the players should be required to watch modules on the new checking rules. I see injuries every weekend and the vast majority occur when 1) a player does not have the puck and he's hit from behind 2) player is in a vulnerable position 3 feet off the boards w/o the puck and a kid "finishes" his check. 3) Big body vs. little body and something has to give. Majority of injuries occur when the player does not have the puck and most kids finishing checks are taking a run at a vulnerable player and also taking themselves out of the play - it's unnecessary. As a ref I am in favor of the new body contact rules - you can still play aggresive, angle and create contact while eliminating the hits causing most of the injuries. IF coaches, players, refs know the rules and are on same page it will be a much better game - I am not anti contact by any means, but I see far too many injuries from pointless hits.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Gone are the days of the hip check as the D angles the F to the boards. Based on the new rules this will now almost always be illegal. This is a great skill for D but I fear this will be lost for future US hockey players.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Anon
Gone are the days of the hip check as the D angles the F to the boards. Based on the new rules this will now almost always be illegal. This is a great skill for D but I fear this will be lost for future US hockey players.
You are 100% correct but I would counter, it was already a lost art, enough so that when you watched one delivered properly, you noticed it because it occurred so infrequently.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

We have been teaching the boys to engage players physically as they enter the zone to get them to surrender the puck. The puck is then collected by the supporting defensive player along the boards. This can now be construed as a penalty, by some officials, yet still meets the mandate of making a play on the puck. This is a 2 player system that has worked for decades without increasing the risk of injury.

The competitive contact rule isn't terrible in concept but the inconsistency throughout the rinks is a problem. I understand the kids will learn the game but for those that are U14 and above their time has passed for this. They should have been "grandfathered" through this new rule change including the automatic offside - which is the most ridiculous rule implemented to date.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Man up
We have been teaching the boys to engage players physically as they enter the zone to get them to surrender the puck. The puck is then collected by the supporting defensive player along the boards. This can now be construed as a penalty, by some officials, yet still meets the mandate of making a play on the puck. This is a 2 player system that has worked for decades without increasing the risk of injury.

The competitive contact rule isn't terrible in concept but the inconsistency throughout the rinks is a problem. I understand the kids will learn the game but for those that are U14 and above their time has passed for this. They should have been "grandfathered" through this new rule change including the automatic offside - which is the most ridiculous rule implemented to date.
If the player engaging the offensive player isn't attempting to play the puck first, it is a penalty and has technically been a penalty for the last four years. At least in the clinics I attended, "play on the puck" was interpreted as the engaging player is using his stick to play the puck first, so stick on puck before contact. Any contact that doesn't include an engaging player at least attempting to get the puck before contact should be deemed as a penalty. I know in speaking to others, depending on who was running their clinic, this message differed or as one partner told me "I've called checking the same way for over 10 years and I'm not changing now". I haven't attended a clinic in two years so it's quite possible they've rectified the messaging issue. If not, it certainly is one of the reasons you will see inconsistency, that and I'm guessing at least 50% of the officials haven't attended a seminar or watched the required modules yet for this season. It's still early so if you are coaching a FS team, hopefully you'll start to see consistency with calls in the coming month or so.

Both officials and coaches are in a tough position with the last two sets of rule changes with regarding contact. For most players, their next step in hockey should be high school teams. Nothing in these rules is preparing Bantams for high school or preparing Midgets trying to step up to varsity. In theory, finishing a check is now a illegal at all youth levels but required in varsity hockey. In the NHL you have roughly one second after a player moves the puck to finish, in high school MIAA officials use a sundial. What will get you five minutes and a game in a U-16 game will garner high fives and "nice job" from your varsity coach. So do you coach to prepare the kids for the next step or to altered rules? The same question can be asked of the officials.

As for no tag up, the most unnecessary rule change I've seen implemented in years. It's amazing how much this one rule change has really had a negative effect on pace of play.


Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

anon
Man up
We have been teaching the boys to engage players physically as they enter the zone to get them to surrender the puck. The puck is then collected by the supporting defensive player along the boards. This can now be construed as a penalty, by some officials, yet still meets the mandate of making a play on the puck. This is a 2 player system that has worked for decades without increasing the risk of injury.

The competitive contact rule isn\'t terrible in concept but the inconsistency throughout the rinks is a problem. I understand the kids will learn the game but for those that are U14 and above their time has passed for this. They should have been \"grandfathered\" through this new rule change including the automatic offside - which is the most ridiculous rule implemented to date.
If the player engaging the offensive player isn't attempting to play the puck first, it is a penalty and has technically been a penalty for the last four years. At least in the clinics I attended, "play on the puck" was interpreted as the engaging player is using his stick to play the puck first, so stick on puck before contact. Any contact that doesn't include an engaging player at least attempting to get the puck before contact should be deemed as a penalty. I know in speaking to others, depending on who was running their clinic, this message differed or as one partner told me "I've called checking the same way for over 10 years and I'm not changing now". I haven't attended a clinic in two years so it's quite possible they've rectified the messaging issue. If not, it certainly is one of the reasons you will see inconsistency, that and I'm guessing at least 50% of the officials haven't attended a seminar or watched the required modules yet for this season. It's still early so if you are coaching a FS team, hopefully you'll start to see consistency with calls in the coming month or so.

Both officials and coaches are in a tough position with the last two sets of rule changes with regarding contact. For most players, their next step in hockey should be high school teams. Nothing in these rules is preparing Bantams for high school or preparing Midgets trying to step up to varsity. In theory, finishing a check is now a illegal at all youth levels but required in varsity hockey. In the NHL you have roughly one second after a player moves the puck to finish, in high school MIAA officials use a sundial. What will get you five minutes and a game in a U-16 game will garner high fives and "nice job" from your varsity coach. So do you coach to prepare the kids for the next step or to altered rules? The same question can be asked of the officials.

As for no tag up, the most unnecessary rule change I've seen implemented in years. It's amazing how much this one rule change has really had a negative effect on pace of play.


^^^^^Excellent post. As a U14 coach I am going to continue to develop my players for high school. If they take penalties then so be it. We will work through it.

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey


😂

Re: The Heavy Hand of USA Hockey

Fed Up Coach
So I've read about the new rules and seen some games with the no tag offsides, icing on PK, and increased scrutiny of checking/body contact. Went to the USA Hockey site to double check the coaching requirements. I've been Level 4 with all modules for a very long time now and had background registration and Safesport up to date. Just came across where Level 4 & Level 5 coaches now have to take CE classes. I've had enough. That was supposed be a LIFETIME certification. More fees, more money, that's all this is about.

Coaching a freaking hockey team should not require as many or more certifications, background checks, CE classes, and requirements than being a freaking lawyer or carrying some other professional degree. 99.9% of us are volunteers who don't make a dime off this. Oh, but I noticed CEP Instructors and NTDP coaches are exempt from paying registration fees. How nice for them.

I am so sick of USA Hockey at this point. Rule change after rule change for the sake of making rule changes. Milking us dry in registration and certification fees. When AAU or USPHL or some other entity takes over youth and junior hockey in this country I will not shed a tear for USA Hockey because they will have done this to themselves.
"Coaching a freaking hockey team should not require as many or more certifications, background checks, CE classes, and requirements than being a freaking lawyer or carrying some other professional degree."

Really... Hyperbole much? :face_with_rolling_eyes: